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How Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce became a hero of civil rights advocates. Edward S.

How Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce became a hero of civil rights advocates.

Curtis/Library of Congress On July 4, 1872, settlers of the Grande Ronde Valley in northeastern Oregon paraded through the streets of their tiny county seat, La Grande, before sitting down for a feast and public recitation of the Declaration of Independence. Afterward, two guests stayed behind—large men about 30 years old, their long braids banded and feathered, wearing bright blankets, clusters of necklaces, and intricately beaded shirts and leggings.

In the 10 years of La Grande’s existence, local Indian chiefs had regularly attended Fourth of July celebrations, affirming peace and friendship with the United States. A settler introduced the guests as Joseph and his younger brother Ollokot, leaders of a nearby Nez Perce band. Joseph and his brother had come to La Grande to speak with the area’s congressman, who was home for recess, and a local man who had just finished serving as the federal superintendent for Indian affairs for Oregon. They hate the US government, and they're multiplying: the terrifying rise of 'sovereign citizens' A Timeline – Russia and President Trump. A 'Forgotten History' Of How The U.S. Government Segregated America.

Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out of the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit's Brewster-Douglass towers.

A 'Forgotten History' Of How The U.S. Government Segregated America

Paul Sancya/AP hide caption toggle caption Paul Sancya/AP. Walking In Their Footsteps At A Former Japanese Internment Camp : Code Switch. The Manzanar cemetery includes a white obelisk monument in the midst of a wide clearing, making it feel lonely.

Walking In Their Footsteps At A Former Japanese Internment Camp : Code Switch

Melissa Hung for NPR hide caption toggle caption Melissa Hung for NPR From the car seat, the toddler, almost three years old, asked his parents what we were doing. "We're here to learn our history, your family's history," his father said from the driver's seat. At A Hefty Cost, World War I Made The U.S. A Major Military Power : Parallels. Gen.

At A Hefty Cost, World War I Made The U.S. A Major Military Power : Parallels

John "Black Jack" Pershing visits Arlington National Cemetery in 1925. Pershing led the U.S. forces in World War I, the moment when the American military first displayed its might in a major foreign war. The U.S. military suffered heavy losses, but it also expanded dramatically, modernized and became more professional under Pershing's command. Library of Congress hide caption toggle caption. The Confederate Cause in the Words of Its Leaders. How much did the Louisiana Purchase actually cost? Wikimedia Commons/White House Historical Association It’s a familiar chapter in our history, part of the triumphant narrative of westward expansion: In 1803, the United States bought a massive chunk of North America, and we got it for a song.

How much did the Louisiana Purchase actually cost?

Spain had ceded the Louisiana Territory to France, and Napoleon, in turn, offloaded it to American diplomats in Paris after the Haitian Revolution ruined his plans for the New World. The JFK assassination (The actual footage) Rare / Vintage. ‘Slam-dunk’ find puts hunter-gatherers in Florida 14,500 years ago. Big game hunters of the Clovis culture may have just gotten the final blow to their reputation as North America’s earliest settlers.

‘Slam-dunk’ find puts hunter-gatherers in Florida 14,500 years ago

At least 1,000 years before Clovis people roamed the Great Plains, a group of hunter-gatherers either butchered a mastodon or scavenged its carcass on Florida’s Gulf Coast. Stone tools discovered in an underwater sinkhole in the Aucilla River show that people were present at the once-dry Page-Ladson site about 14,550 years ago, reports a team led by geoarchaeologists Jessi Halligan of Florida State University in Tallahassee and Michael Waters of Texas A&M University in College Station. The Clovis people appeared in North America around 13,000 years ago.

Radiocarbon dating of twigs, seeds and plant fragments from submerged sediment layers provides a solid age estimate for six stone artifacts excavated by scuba divers, the team reports May 13 in Science Advances. When is Thanksgiving? Colonizing America: Crash Course US History #2. First woman candidate for President.

Early America & United States Constitution. I never thought I would see this on TV. - Patricio Dominguez. The Appalachians: The Scotch-Irish. The True Story of Hidden Figures. Meet Jane, the 14-year-old eaten when the first British settlers in America turned to cannibalism: The macabre secrets of starving pioneers besieged by Red Indians. Skull of a 14-year-old girl, named 'Jane of Jamestown', shows scratch marks Anthropologists from the Smith-sonian National Museum of Natural History analysed her skull and severed leg bones Dr Douglas Owsley said bones evidence of 'survival cannibalism' Human remains date back to the deadly winter of 1609-1610, known as the 'starving time' in Jamestown, when hundreds of colonists died By Annabel Venning for MailOnline Published: 22:35 GMT, 15 May 2013 | Updated: 22:35 GMT, 15 May 2013 She had arrived in America only a few months earlier.

Meet Jane, the 14-year-old eaten when the first British settlers in America turned to cannibalism: The macabre secrets of starving pioneers besieged by Red Indians

After a stormy 16-week voyage across the Atlantic, Jane, a 14-year-old girl from southern England, would have been relieved to reach land when she scrambled ashore at Jamestown, the first permanent English colony in America, in August 1609. But any sense of salvation was to be short-lived. Discovering American Women's History Online. 500 Nations - The story of native Americans - part I.

500 Nations - The story of native Americans - part II. 500 nations (part 3 of 4) 500 Nations Part 4. 'Politics Ain’t the Same' — How the 19th Amendment Changed American Elections - BillMoyers.com. A line of suffragists march with banners that read "Come to the White House Sunday at 3," in Washington DC in 1915.

'Politics Ain’t the Same' — How the 19th Amendment Changed American Elections - BillMoyers.com

(Photo by Harris & Ewing/Buyenlarge/Getty Images) My mother was born in the United States of America without the right to vote. I just stopped to re-read that sentence because it seems so, you know, quaint. Okay, preposterous. First Humans Entered the Americas Along the Coast, Not Through the Ice. Many Black Cowboys Developed Their Skills in Africa, not America: Little Known Facts About Black Cowboys. The cowboy remains one of the most popular figures in American culture.

Many Black Cowboys Developed Their Skills in Africa, not America: Little Known Facts About Black Cowboys

Whether chasing bad guys or herding cattle or sitting around the campfire, the cowboy has been immortalized in countless movies, books and television shows. However, he is seldom seen as African American. Despite the lack of Black images, men of color did in fact handle cattle, tame horses, work ranches, encounter outlaws and star in rodeos. The Rise and Not-Quite-Fall of Religion in American Politics. By Derek Beres Religion and politics are old bedfellows generally—for millennia the two were indistinguishable.

The Rise and Not-Quite-Fall of Religion in American Politics

But to understand how we've arrived at where we are today, we need only travel back to the last great economic crash: the Great Depression. As Americans were trying to piece together any semblance of identity, and as Roosevelt initiated the sweeping reforms of the New Deal, a grumbling was heard emanating from conservative America. Voices of History - Old Time Radio Shows - OTR. The American Presidency Project.

Immigration Through Ellis Island - Award Winning Documentary Video Film. The true story behind “The Revenant” is even crazier than the movie. By now, many of us have at least seen the trailer for The Revenant, with Leonardo DiCaprio cast as Hugh Glass, a fur trapper and hunter who embarks on a mission for vengeance after being left for dead by his cohorts in the wake of a bear attack. As it turns out, Hugh Glass was a real guy who had a pivotal role in the westward expansion of the fur trade, and by extension, America. The Real Reason America Used Nuclear Weapons Against Japan. It Was Not To End the War Or Save Lives.

Like all Americans, I was taught that the U.S. dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in order to end WWII and save both American and Japanese lives. But most of the top American military officials at the time said otherwise. The U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey group, assigned by President Truman to study the air attacks on Japan, produced a report in July of 1946 that concluded (52-56): Remembering Injustice to Japanese Americans. On this day in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which gave the U.S. military the authority to incarcerate more than 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. February 19 is observed today as the Day of Remembrance. In communities across the country, the Day of Remembrance is commemorated with events to promote education and understanding about this dark chapter in American history. America’s Hidden History: The Eugenics Movement. By Teryn Bouche and Laura Rivard The United States has an imperfect history.

Some of our darker chapters include slavery, the decimation of Native American populations, and atrocities committed during our various wars. A quick survey will reveal that most Americans have learned about or at least heard of these events. However, ask the average person about the “ eugenics movement” and you are likely to get blank stares. We at Genetics Generation believe it is time to raise awareness of this tragic time in our country’s history. Library of Congress Home. 3 maps that explain America. The United States of America is a young country, but it's also big and complicated and fascinating. It can be tough to distill all that down to a few maps, but here are three that capture the story of America about as well as anything. If you enjoyed this, please read our much more comprehensive 70 Maps that Explain America, which goes through everything from early colonization to slavery and its legacies to the history of American global power.

US History Overview 1: Jamestown to the Civil War. "Appalachian Journey", Alan Lomax (1991) Watch how immigration in America has changed since 1820. By Alvin Chang on April 26, 2016. President Obama ‘One of the Most Successful Presidents in American History’ On Immigration, Law Is on Obama’s Side. THE legal controversy surrounding the Obama administration’s immigration enforcement policies will soon come to a head when the Supreme Court justices hear the case United States v.

Texas on Monday. Texas claims that the president’s executive decisions lack legal sanction by Congress and have injured the state. But whether or not you like President Obama’s actions, he has operated under longstanding provisions of law that give the executive branch discretion in enforcement. This presidential prerogative has been recognized explicitly by the Supreme Court. Great Moments From Roberts Court Dissents. The Cold War’s Over—So Why Is the US Military Still Built to Fight It?

This article originally appeared at TomDispatch.com. To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up to receive the latest updates from TomDispatch.com. It’s 1990. The Truth About Columbus Day: Why Are We Celebrating? USA history. Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin’s Snuff Box to 'Citizens United' The following excerpt is the introduction to Zephyr Teachout’s new book, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United.

The Citizens United decision was not merely bad law; it was bad for politics, and displayed an even worse understanding of history. Americans from James Madison onward have argued that it is possible for politicians and citizens alike to try to achieve a kind of public good in the public sphere. The traditional view is not naive — it does not assume that people are generally public regarding.

It assumes that the job of government is to create structures to curb temptations that lead to exaggerated self-interest.