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Get the Word of the Day - protean

Get the Word of the Day - protean
Argonaut comes from the Greek term Argonaútēs meaning "crewman of the ship Argo." In Greek legend, the argonauts board the Argo, named after its builder, Argus, in pursuit of the Golden Fleece, which is guarded by a dragon that never sleeps. Naûs is the Greek term for "ship."

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Australian English Australian English (AusE, AuE, AusEng, AustralE, en-AU[1]) is a major variety of the English language, used throughout Australia. Although English has no official status in the Constitution, Australian English is the country's de facto official language and is the first language of the majority of the population. Australian English began to diverge from British English after the founding of the Colony of New South Wales in 1788 and was recognised as being different from British English by 1820. It arose from the intermingling of early settlers from a great variety of mutually intelligible dialectal regions of the British Isles and quickly developed into a distinct variety of English.[2] History[edit]

Merriam Webster "… so we repaired to a publick-house, took a friendly glass, and thus parted." — Peter Drake, Amiable Renegade: The Memoirs of Captain Peter Drake, 1671–1753, 1960 "… Warren repaired to the dining alcove off the kitchen … and ate dinner with Nina and the children, discussing their schoolwork and events of the day." — Kevin Starr, Embattled Dreams, 2002 We are all familiar with the verb repair used as a synonym of fix. But today's word, while it is a homograph and a homophone of the more familiar repair, is a slightly older and unrelated verb. Repair, the synonym of fix, comes via Anglo-French from the Latin reparare, a combination of the re- prefix and parare ("prepare"). Repair, the synonym of go (which in English also once meant "to return"), has Anglo-French and Latin roots too, but makes its way back to the Late Latin repatriare (which means "to go home again" and is a source of the English repatriate).

The Power of Curiosity Todd Kashdan · Discover how cultivating an inquiring mind can help you lead a happier, healthier life. What do you want most in life? For the vast majority of us, the answer is “to be happy.” In a 2007 survey of more than 10,000 people from 48 countries published in Perspectives on Psychological Sciences, happiness was viewed as more important than success, intelligence, knowledge, maturity, wisdom, relationships, wealth and meaning in life. Happiness is a good thing. Character meme fun! This is how I was procrastinating during the exam period. "Post-processual theory? ...After I've cleared out my hard drive, I think... ... ooh! What's this? A daft questionnaire I saved from somewhere on the Internet? I must fill it in."

Fortune Cookies Stories For you hardy souls who have time to spare, here's a recipe for making the cookies, so you can put your own messages in them. Prepare fortunes by writing messages on about 20 strips of paper. TIPS: -- These cookies cool very quickly and get stiffer as they cool, so only bake two or three at a time, since you want to bend them into shape around the message while they're still warm. List of English words of Yiddish origin This is a list of words that have entered the English language from the Yiddish language, many of them by way of American English. There are differing approaches to the romanisation of Yiddish orthography (which uses the Hebrew alphabet) and the spelling of some of these words may therefore be variable (for example, schlep is also seen as shlep, schnoz as shnozz). Many of these words are more common in the US entertainment industry, via vaudeville, the Catskills/Borscht Belt, and Hollywood. Others are more regionally oriented, e.g., in the New York City metropolitan area. A number of Yiddish words also entered English via large Jewish communities in Britain, particularly London, where Yiddish has influenced the Cockney dialect. A number of Yiddish words are related to Hebrew, Germanic or Slavic forms, and some words of those origins have entered English via Yiddish.

English Slang Dictionary - L - Audio Download Podcast: Play in new window | Download | Embed (Right click on the “Download” link above and click “Save As” to download.) In Episode 17, I discuss the two main methods of language learning, the Wright Brothers’ “Glider Method” and the typical, ineffective “Engine Method.” Fast English fluency requires students to study the right learning material the right way in the right order. Listen to discover why how you learn English is more important than what English you learn if you want to become a confident, fluent English speaker quickly. Enjoy episode 17 and let us know what you think in the comments below.

Discover Amazing New Websites & Services - Wibki: Unlock the Web! Discover Amazing New Websites & Services – Wibki: Unlock the Web! I love discovering new websites. We are fortunate to live in a revolutionary era; an era that allows us access to infinite knowledge and offers services that were denied from us only a few years back… The Internet provides us with endless possibilities, no matter what our interests, craves or needs are. The problem is that 90% of it consists of cute cats, porn, ‘how to get rich’ frauds, and other stumble baits… I love the instance acknowledgment when I encounter a landing page that is worthy of my time. When I finally manage to discover a site that really blows my mind or a service that I can actually see myself use, it feels extremely rewarding. Lucky for me, this is my day job.

The 100 Most Important Things To Know About Your Character (revised) Quote from original Author(Beth):This list came about when, one day while struggling to develop a character for an upcoming Hunter game, my lovely roommate Nikki looked at me and said something like, "Wouldn't it be cool to have a list of questions you could go through and answer while you were making characters, so you'd make sure to consider all sorts of different elements in their personality?" I agreed, and that very evening we sat down over hot chocolate and ramen noodles to whip up a list of 100 appearance-, history-, and personality-related questions (which seemed like a nice even number) to answer as a relatively easy yet still in-depth character building exercise. Later on, we went through the list again, took out the questions that sucked (because there were a lot of them) and replaced them with better ones. What you see before you is the result of that second revision.

Magnanimous adjective generous in forgiving an insult or injury; free from petty resentfulness or vindictiveness: to be magnanimous toward one's enemies. high-minded; noble: a just and magnanimous ruler. proceeding from or revealing generosity or nobility of mind, character, etc.: a magnanimous gesture of forgiveness. Origin: 1575–85; < Latin magnanimus great-souled, equivalent to magn ( us ) magn- + anim ( us ) spirit, soul, mind + -us -ous

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