background preloader

Home : Oxford English Dictionary

Home : Oxford English Dictionary
OED Appeals Do you have an earlier record of a word which our editors are currently researching? Take a look at our recent appeals and submit your evidence. Learn more about the history of the OED Appeals in this article by Associate Editor Peter Gilliver. March 2014 update What's new: Learn more about the latest revisions and new words from Head of US Dictionaries, Katherine Martin, and and delve a little deeper into some of the entries that have been revised with the release notes by Deputy Chief Editors Philip Durkin and Edmund Weiner.

http://www.oed.com/

Related:  Dictionaries and Reference ToolsE-booksReferenceEnglish languagewords

Table of Contents abduction (Igor Douven) Abelard [Abailard], Peter (Peter King) Abhidharma (Noa Ronkin) abilities (John Maier) Abner of Burgos (Shalom Sadik) Abrabanel, Judah (Aaron Hughes) abstract objects (Gideon Rosen) accidental properties — see essential vs. accidental properties action (George Wilson and Samuel Shpall) action-based theories of perception (Robert Briscoe and Rick Grush) action at a distance — see quantum mechanics: action at a distance in actualism (Christopher Menzel) adaptationism (Steven Hecht Orzack and Patrick Forber) Addams, Jane (Maurice Hamington) Adorno, Theodor W. (Lambert Zuidervaart) advance directives (Agnieszka Jaworska) Aegidius Romanus — see Giles of Rome Aenesidemus — see skepticism: ancient aesthetic, concept of the (James Shelley) aesthetics aesthetics of the everyday (Yuriko Saito) affirmative action (Robert Fullinwider) Africana Philosophy (Lucius T. Outlaw Jr.)

AQA English Language A (exam board) At AS, this course focuses on personal and immediate language contexts. At A2, language is placed in its wider social, historical and global contexts and independent study is required. This four-unit specification introduces advanced language study. American Slang Dictionary A dictionary that explains commonly used American slang words can be a very useful resource for anyone interested in learning more about how language continues to evolve throughout the United States. YourDictionary includes definitions of the most common of these slang words and provides additional usage information in various slang articles. About Slang in Popular Culture

Names for the Wind Abroholos: a squall frequent from May through August between Cabo de Sao Tome and Cabo Frio on the coast of Brazil. Aejej in Morocco: a whirlwind in the desert. Aeolus: regent of the winds in Greek mythology. Air: Earth's atmosphere is a layer of gases surrounding the planet Earth and retained by the Earth's gravity. It contains roughly 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 0.97% argon, 0.04% carbon dioxide, and trace amounts of other gases, in addition to water vapor. This mixture of gases is commonly known as air.

The Best Free Dictionary and Thesaurus Programs and Websites Are you a writer? Or a word geek? If you write anything or play word games, dictionaries, thesauruses, and other reference tools can come in handy. We’ve found some useful offline and online tools for looking up words, finding synonym, or building words in Scrabble. Dictionary and thesaurus programs and websites allow us to go beyond the dated, printed dictionary. Pathfinders This guide is designed for anyone who is looking for the origin of words and/or phrases, also called etymology (these terms will be used interchangeably in this pathfinder). Both print-based and Web-based sources are included. Internet Sources | Searching for Etymology | Print Resources Internet Sources In general, web sites on word and phrase origins are good, but not comprehensive: most of them are question services of a sort, and the answers are posted on the site.

List of Interactive Quizzes The quizzes with a magenta marble are also listed within the section or digital handout to which they apply. The twenty-one quizzes with a green marble and designated "Practice" have been adapted from the instructor's manual and other ancillary materials accompanying Sentence Sense: A Writer's Guide. They are duplicated here with permission of the author, Evelyn Farbman, and the publisher, Houghton Mifflin Inc. 80 Million Tiny Images You have submitted 0 labels. Visual dictionary: Visualization of 53,464 english nouns arranged by meaning. Each tile shows the average color of the images that correspond to each term. Visual dictionary Click on top of the map to visualize the images in that region of the visual dictionary. We present a visualization of all the nouns in the English language arranged by semantic meaning.

Fossil word A fossil word is a word that is generally obsolete but remains in currency because it is contained within an idiom still in use.[1][2] Fossil status can also occur for word senses and for phrases. An example for a word sense is navy in merchant navy, which means 'commercial fleet' (although that sense of navy is obsolete elsewhere). An example for a phrase is in point ('relevant'), which is retained in the larger phrases case in point (also case on point in the legal context) and in point of fact but is not otherwise used outside of a legal context. English language examples[edit] Stanford Parser Stanford Parser Please enter a sentence to be parsed: My dog also likes eating sausage.

Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins "A treasure (from the Greek ‘thesauros’, treasure, store or storehouse) trove (past participle of an Anglo-Norman verb meaning ‘to find’) of verbal wonders" – William Hartston, Daily Express Combining both accessibility and authority, The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins describes the origins and development of over 3,000 words and phrases in the English language. The book draws on Oxford's unrivalled dictionary research programme and language monitoring, and relates the fascinating stories behind many of our most curious terms and expressions in order to offer the reader a much more explicit account than can be found in a general English dictionary. Organized A-Z, the entries include first known use along with examples that illustrate the many faces of the particular word or phrase, from ‘handsome’ to ‘bachelor’ and ‘cute’ to ‘baby’, from ‘pagan’ to ‘palaver’ and ‘toff’ to ‘torpedo’. Bibliographic Information

Grammar A-Z Some grammatical terms may be familiar to you, but others can be confusing or hard to remember. Clicking on any term below will give you a quick and clear definition. Below the categorized section you’ll find all the terms listed from A–Z, so you can browse that way if you prefer. English: what you need to know about the language english, english language, english lingusitics, english as a second language, english as a foreign language, english as the world What are the world's most widely spoken languages?In which countries is English the language spoken by the majority as a first language?In which countries is English an official language?How many people speak English as a second language?

Gen Y’s New Words for 2009 NEW SLANG From povo and myselfish to retox and kward, the terms to know for 2009 While we understand the fleeting nature of slang and promise we are not “trying to make ‘fetch’ happen,” each year ushers in a bevy of new words you might hear and may even want to use (though we urge you to do so sparingly). 2009 introduces us to a vocabulary inspired by pop culture and technology, and here are a few of the favorites heard from the streets, our bloggers, and Gen Ys who know… RECESSION-INSPIRED SLANG Povo (po-vo) “Caroline, I can’t go out to dinner tonight: My pay cut has left me totally povo.” Ex-hole n.

"The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is widely regarded as the accepted authority on the English language. It is an unsurpassed guide to the meaning, history, and pronunciation of 600,000 words— past and present—from across the English-speaking world." by macopa May 14

Related:  B2i - C2i2e AnglaisOxford University PressWORD!ReferenceDictionnaires & LexiquesWriting ResourcesAutodidacticsReferences/DictionariesEnglish MaterialsDiccionarios