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Lexical FreeNet

Lexical FreeNet

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Table of Contents abduction (Igor Douven) Abelard [Abailard], Peter (Peter King) Abhidharma (Noa Ronkin) abilities (John Maier) Abner of Burgos (Shalom Sadik) Abrabanel, Judah (Aaron Hughes) abstract objects (Gideon Rosen) accidental properties — see essential vs. accidental properties action (George Wilson and Samuel Shpall) action-based theories of perception (Robert Briscoe and Rick Grush) action at a distance — see quantum mechanics: action at a distance in actualism (Christopher Menzel) adaptationism (Steven Hecht Orzack and Patrick Forber) Addams, Jane (Maurice Hamington) Adorno, Theodor W. (Lambert Zuidervaart) advance directives (Agnieszka Jaworska) Aegidius Romanus — see Giles of Rome Aenesidemus — see skepticism: ancient aesthetic, concept of the (James Shelley) aesthetics aesthetics of the everyday (Yuriko Saito) affirmative action (Robert Fullinwider) Africana Philosophy (Lucius T. Outlaw Jr.) B [jump to top] C [jump to top]

Phrasal Verbs con frases explicativas y traducción. Vocabulario inglés. Aprende idiomas gratis 1. Break down When a machine or a vehicle breaks down, it stops working. 2. Break up/off If you break up/off a relationship or agreement, you end it. 3. Main Page The Internet Ancient History Sourcebook has expanded greatly since its creation, and now contains hundred of local files as well as links to source texts throughout the net. See Introduction for an explanation of the Sourcebook's goals. See the Help! page for all the help on research I can offer. Although I am more than happy to receive notes if you have comments on this web site, I cannot answer specific research enquiries [and - for students - I cannot, or rather will not, do your homework.]

The Best Free Dictionary and Thesaurus Programs and Websites Are you a writer? Or a word geek? If you write anything or play word games, dictionaries, thesauruses, and other reference tools can come in handy. Pathfinders This guide is designed for anyone who is looking for the origin of words and/or phrases, also called etymology (these terms will be used interchangeably in this pathfinder). Both print-based and Web-based sources are included. Internet Sources | Searching for Etymology | Print Resources Phrasal verbs Phrasal verbs (to) eat away: roer, carcomer, corroer, desgastar. (to) eat into: corroer, comerse. (to) eat out: comer fuera, cenar fuera. (to) eat up: comerse, consumir, tragar, devorar.

Mesopotamia Halsall Home | Medieval Sourcebook | Modern History Sourcebook Other History Sourcebooks: African | East Asian | Indian | Islamic | Jewish | LGBT | Women's | Global | Science See Main Page for a guide to all contents of all sections. Common Issues: Mesopotamian/Egyptian/Hebrew/Greek History MEGA Abzu: Guide to Resources for the Study of the Ancient Near East Available on the Internet [At Chicago] 2ND Emergence of Civilization in Ancient Near East [At Internet Archive, from UNT][Modern Account] 2ND The Near East 3000-1200 BCE [At Internet Archive, from UNT][Modern Account]

Stanford Parser Stanford Parser Please enter a sentence to be parsed: My dog also likes eating sausage. Language: Sample Sentence Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins "A treasure (from the Greek ‘thesauros’, treasure, store or storehouse) trove (past participle of an Anglo-Norman verb meaning ‘to find’) of verbal wonders" – William Hartston, Daily Express Combining both accessibility and authority, The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins describes the origins and development of over 3,000 words and phrases in the English language. The book draws on Oxford's unrivalled dictionary research programme and language monitoring, and relates the fascinating stories behind many of our most curious terms and expressions in order to offer the reader a much more explicit account than can be found in a general English dictionary. Organized A-Z, the entries include first known use along with examples that illustrate the many faces of the particular word or phrase, from ‘handsome’ to ‘bachelor’ and ‘cute’ to ‘baby’, from ‘pagan’ to ‘palaver’ and ‘toff’ to ‘torpedo’.

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