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Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events

Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events

https://newsela.com/articles/?language=en

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The surprising things Seattle teachers won for students by striking Striking Seattle School District teachers and other educators walk a picket line Sept. 10 near Franklin High School in Seattle. (Ted S. Warren/AP) Seattle teachers went on strike for a week this month with a list of goals for a new contract. By the time the strike officially ended this week, teachers had won some of the usual stuff of contract negotiations — for example, the first cost-of-living raises in six years — but also less standard objectives. For one thing, teachers demanded, and won, guaranteed daily recess for all elementary school students — 30 minutes each day.

The Child Labor Education Project Today, approximately 215 million children, many as young as five, are involved in child labor around the globe. Child labor is work that harms children or keeps them from attending school. It involves work by children under conditions that are hazardous, illegal, or exploitive. The Child Labor Public Education Project of the University of Iowa Labor Center and Center for Human Rights provides educational workshops and materials on a range of issues regarding child labor in the U.S. and other countries: Classroom Resources TeachersFirst’s Classroom Resources area includes anything you would use with students in the classroom. You can find over 16,000 educator-reviewed web resources, searchable by subject/grade or keyword. You can also find lesson plans/units, ready-to-go content you can share on student computers, a projector, or interactive whiteboard, and special topic collections of web resources. Everything we offer will show up via keyword searches, or you can simply browse. We even offer just-in-time collections organized into a classroom planning calendar.

5 Important Things I've Learned About Classroom Blogging 1. Just ship it. Don’t spend too much time worrying about how the blog looks from a design standpoint because you can always tweak it later. When you’re getting started, any of the standard templates from Blogger, WordPress.com, KidBlog, Edublogs, or Weebly will do. The important thing is to get the blog started. As one of my bosses at FedEx used to say, “don’t let perfect be the enemy of good.” Has Your Child Had an AT Evaluation? For students with learning disabilities, technology is an important tool in leveling the playing field, providing struggling students with the ability to access educational material that may otherwise prove challenging to understand. As Assistive Technology (AT) continues to evolve, the task of understanding what makes sense for your child becomes more complex. Thankfully there are professionals that can help. It all begins with an AT evaluation, which should be conducted by a professional or team of professionals, often including an independent evaluator, who are knowledgeable about the specific needs of your child. The evaluator should have experience and training in AT devices, services, and implementation, and be able to integrate the technologies into the curriculum through the IEP or 504 plan. A thorough evaluation may include the following components:

Farm Worker Issues : National Farm Worker Ministry Agricultural work is hard work. In order to feed the country, an estimated 2-3 million farm workers labor in the fields across the United States, including handpicking the vast majority of fruit and vegetable crops produced here. In many cases these workers are young adults or even children; in all cases, farm workers are excluded from important national labor protections that other workers possess. New Jersey Department of Education Governor Chris Christie • Lt. Governor Kim GuadagnoNJ Home | Services A to Z | Departments/Agencies | FAQs DOE A to Z: A B CD E FG H IJ K LM N OP Q RS T UV W XY Z #

“What’s ‘Colorism’?” Illustration by Alex Eben Meyer When I began teaching in Boston, I was struck by how often students of color referred to each other as “light-skinned” or “dark-skinned.” Almost daily, I witnessed high school students identify, categorize and stereotype their peers based on skin tone. Having grown up African American in Louisiana, I was used to white people’s ideas of white superiority and even those “colorstruck” black people who preferred lighter skin. But I did not expect that so many young people of diverse ethnicities—including Dominicans, Puerto Ricans and Cape Verdeans—would actively engage in everyday forms of skin-color bias.

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