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Why Are Millions Of Fish Suddenly Dying In Mass Death Events All Over The Planet?

Why Are Millions Of Fish Suddenly Dying In Mass Death Events All Over The Planet?
Michael SnyderActivist Post Millions upon millions of fish are suddenly dying in mass death events all over the world, and nobody seems to know why it is happening. In many of the news reports that are linked to below, locals are quoted as saying that they have never seen anything like this before. So is there a connection between all of the fish deaths that are now occurring all over the planet? If there is a connection, is there anything that we can do to stop the fish die-off? Please share the list posted below with as many people as you can. -July 18, 2013: 20 acres of fish ponds full of dead fish in Shandong, China -July 18, 2013: Hundreds of dead Stingrays wash ashore in Veracruz, Mexico -July 18, 2013: 10,000 lbs of dead fish found in a lake in Nanjing, China -July 18, 2013: Thousands of fish dead from “lack of rain” in Sugar Lake, Missouri -July 18, 2013: Large numbers of fish washing up on the shores of Lake Michigan -July 22, 2013: Large fish kill at Grand Lake in St. Related:  Ocean ProtectionEnvironmentEnvironment and Climate Change

EU beefs up electronic waste recycling | Environment The European Parliament has been criticised for waving through revised rules on the disposal of electronic equipment without including any provision to promote the reuse of old equipment. As a result of last week's vote, member states will have to increase their collection of e-waste beyond the current flat-rate target of 4kg per person per year, so that by 2016 they will instead have to collect 45 tonnes for every 100 tonnes of electronic goods put on sale three years previously. By 2019, this target will rise to a collection rate of 65 per cent of sales from three years previous, although countries have the alternative of collecting a comparable figure of 85 per cent of all e-waste generated. In a statement, the parliament said better processing of e-waste would not only reduce the amount of potentially toxic waste sent to landfill or illegally exported overseas, but lead to greater recovery of valuable raw materials.

off topic Insight: As Congress looks away, U.S. tiptoes toward exporting a gas bounty A Republican Case for Climate Action There is no longer any credible scientific debate about the basic facts: our world continues to warm, with the last decade the hottest in modern records, and the deep ocean warming faster than the earth’s atmosphere. Sea level is rising. Arctic Sea ice is melting years faster than projected. The costs of inaction are undeniable. The lines of scientific evidence grow only stronger and more numerous. A market-based approach, like a carbon tax, would be the best path to reducing greenhouse-gas emissions, but that is unachievable in the current political gridlock in Washington. The president also plans to use his regulatory power to limit the powerful warming chemicals known as hydrofluorocarbons and encourage the United States to join with other nations to amend the Montreal Protocol to phase out these chemicals. As administrators of the E.P.A under Presidents Richard M. The solutions we supported worked, although more must be done. We can have both a strong economy and a livable climate.

'They're killing us': world's most endangered tribe cries for help | World news | The Observer Loggers strip trees from Amazonian tribe's territory Link to video: Loggers strip trees from Amazonian tribe's territory Trundling along the dirt roads of the Amazon, the giant logging lorry dwarfed the vehicle of the investigators following it. The trunks of nine huge trees were piled high on the back – incontrovertible proof of the continuing destruction of the world's greatest rainforest and its most endangered tribe, the Awá. Yet as they travelled through the jungle early this year, the small team from Funai – Brazil's National Indian Foundation – did not dare try to stop the loggers; the vehicle was too large and the loggers were almost certainly armed. All they could do was video the lorry and add the film to the growing mountain of evidence showing how the Awá – with only 355 surviving members, more than 100 of whom have had no contact with the outside world – are teetering on the edge of extinction. The Awá are one of only two nomadic hunter-gathering tribes left in the Amazon.

Climate Change, Deforestation, Biomes and Ocean Currents, Plankton, Endangered Species - Earth Web Site Click for more detail Thermohaline Change Evidence is growing that the thermohaline current may be slowed or stopped by cold fresh water inputs to the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. This could occur if global warming is sufficient to cause large scale melting of arctic sea ice and the Greenland ice sheet. Such a change in the current may be gradual (over centuries) or very rapid (over a few years). "Diatoms (a kind of phytoplankton) are estimated to "scrub" roughly as much CO2 from the atmosphere each year as all the world's rainforests. "Net primary productivity is the mass of plant material produced each year on land and in the oceans by photosynthesis using energy from sunlight. Biodiversity is the variety of life found at all levels of biological organization, ranging from individuals and populations to species, communities and ecosystems. Click for more detail Some of the sun's energy is being blocked from reaching the earth by air pollution. What are they?

Coral reefs heading for fishing and climate crisis 23 February 2011Last updated at 14:37 By Richard Black Environment correspondent, BBC News Healthy coral reefs provide a living for about 275 million people, with many more dependent on them Three-quarters of the world's coral reefs are at risk due to overfishing, pollution, climate change and other factors, says a major new assessment. Reefs at Risk Revisited collates the work of hundreds of scientists and took three years to compile. The biggest threat is exploitative fishing, the researchers say, though most reefs will be feeling the impact of climate change within 20 years. But, they say, there are measures that can be taken to protect at least some. Continue reading the main story “Start Quote If we don't learn from these successes then I think that in 50 years' time, most reefs will be gone” End QuoteDr Mark SpaldingThe Nature Conservancy The report is compiled by a group of more than 20 research and conservation organisations, led by the World Resources Institute (WRI) in Washington DC.

China admits to existence of 'cancer villages' sprouting up due to extreme pollution, chemical exposure (NaturalNews) On the heels of my own publication of articles questioning the integrity of "certified organic" when it comes to foods and superfoods produced in mainland China, a blockbuster report from China's own environmental ministry slams another exclamation mark on the severity of the problem. For the first time in history, the Chinese government is now openly admitting that severe exposure to chemicals via water pollution, air pollution and environmental pollution is causing the rise of "cancer villages" across China. Their report states: Poisonous and harmful chemical materials have brought about many water and atmosphere emergencies... certain places are even seeing 'cancer villages'... It goes on to admit: [China allows the use of] poisonous and harmful chemical products that are banned in developed countries and pose long-term or potential harm to human health and the ecology. Pollution? In reality, China has the worst pollution problems of any modern nation on our planet.

Conservation in Madagascar Madagascar has suffered environmental degradation over a significant part of its land mass. Forests that once blanketed the eastern third of the island have now been degraded, fragmented, and converted to scrub land. Spiny forests in the south are rapidly giving way to "cactus scrub" as indigenous vegetation is cut and burned for subsistence charcoal production. Viewed from above, Madagascar's rivers look as if they are bleeding the country to death as soil is eroded away from the central highlands. This ecological decline has not been ignored. At present, more dollars are pouring into conservation efforts in Madagascar than any other part of Africa. Next >> Conservation index Parks in Madagascar | Madagascar's Parks Service Threats to Madagascar's environment | Saving Madagascar's environment | Rehabilitating ecosystems in Madagascar | What happened to Madagascar's megafauna | Conservation plan for Madagascar | Funding conservation initiatives in Madagascar Find a mistake?

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