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Diana Laufenberg: How to learn? From mistakes

Diana Laufenberg: How to learn? From mistakes

https://www.ted.com/talks/diana_laufenberg_3_ways_to_teach

Related:  Information Fluency & InquiryEducación siglo XXIFlipped Classroom

10 TED Talks Every Art Teacher Should Watch Hopefully, when I tell you I have been watching Ted Talks non-stop for a month, you know I am talking about the short, inspiring videos and not the rude, crude talking bear. TED Talks started back in 1984 when a conference was held for Technology, Entertainment, and Design. Speakers were challenged to present powerful speeches in under 18 minutes. Since then, it has grown into a national movement with one mission– to spread ideas. My first TED talk happened to be by Matt Cutts with his challenge to do something new for 30 days.

Flip This Library: School Libraries Need a Revolution School libraries need a revolution, not evolution One of the biggest business battles of our time is between Microsoft and Google. The two have very different business models. Microsoft believes that if they build it, we will come—and buy their product. Google’s approach is different: if they build it, we will integrate it into our lives.

Five psychological findings every history teacher should know This text is somewhere between what I planned to say and what I did say during my session at the Historical Association’s annual conference in Bristol yesterday, with a few reflections in italics. I’m going to start with a couple of stories from the pillar of the local free press: Hackney Today. As one of only a handful of local authorities still publishing a paper fortnightly, and having recently been instructed to cease doing so by central government, this is not an opportunity to be missed.

The Flipped Learning Process Visually Explained April 2, 2015 After yesterday’s post on “Flipped Learning Resources” one of our readers emailed us this beautiful visual outlining the six main steps involved in the creation of a flipped classroom. These steps include: planning, recording, sharing, changing, grouping, and regrouping. Read the graphic for more details on each of these steps. As a refresher for those who are not yet familiar with the concept of a flipped classroom. Flipped learning or Flipped classroom or is a methodology, an approach to learning in which technology is employed to reverse the traditional role of classroom time.

Can reading make you smarter? When I was eight years old, I still couldn't read. I remember my teacher Mrs Browning walking over to my desk and asking me to read a few sentences from a Dick and Jane book. She pointed to a word. Flipping the Library: Tips from Three Pros Through the use of innovative technologies and online resources, school libraries can now be available to students wherever—and whenever—they need them. “Flipped” or blended learning offers students the power of personalized instruction, through a mix of virtual and face-to-face interactions, at a student’s own pace. Embracing this concept is a must for student engagement and the future of the profession, say school librarians Joyce Valenza, Brenda Boyer, and Michelle Luhtala. The powerhouse trio of experts shared their thoughts on the concept during “Flipped School Libraries,” a rapid-fire, dynamic session during The Digital Shift: Reinventing Libraries (#TDS13) webcast on October 16, in which they exchanged tips, inspiration, motivation, and their favorite tech tools. “The library has to be flipped. In the classroom, Valenza notes, the flipped model frees up time to be used interactively on problem-based learning, and turns the 100-plus-year-old instruction model on its head.

Train Your Brain To Let Go Of Habits – 10 Methods For Creating New Neural Pathways When you understand how neural pathways are created in the brain, you get a front row seat for truly comprehending how to let go of habits. Neural pathways are like superhighways of nerve cells that transmit messages. You travel over the superhighway many times, and the pathway becomes more and more solid. You may go to a specific food or cigarettes for comfort over and over, and that forms a brain pathway. The hopeful fact, however, is that the brain is always changing and you can forge new pathways and create new habits. It's Never Too Late to Flip! As the upper school librarian at the Bullis School in Potomac, Md., a northwest suburb of Washington, D.C., I’m viewed as a valued resource by teachers who are preparing to embark on research projects with their students. Unfortunately, I don’t have the luxury of spending more than a single class period with students, so it is important that I use the time well. Toward that end, I have developed a set of tools that allows me to optimize my time with them by “flipping” what are traditionally viewed as classroom tasks (lectures) with what are traditionally viewed as homework tasks (researching and writing).

How To Trick Your Brain To Hold On To Positive Habit Changes We truly are creatures of habit. Nearly half of our everyday behaviors tend to be repeated in the same location almost every day, according to research out of Duke University. That means most of the time we are running on autopilot. This is a good thing. "Without habits, people would be doomed to plan, consciously guide, and monitor every action, from making that first cup of coffee in the morning to sequencing the finger movements in a Chopin piano concerto," the researchers David Neal, Wendy Wood, and Jeffrey Quinn write. So what of the new habits we're working hard to form--the ones that seem to suddenly veer off course?

Retrieval Practice: A Powerful Strategy to Improve Learning — Summary of Recommendations Use retrieval practice as a learning strategy, not as an assessment tool.Use retrieval practice frequently, as often as possible. Practice makes perfect!Use retrieval practice a few days or weeks after a lesson or study session. Space it out.Use a variety of strategies to implement frequent retrieval practice: clickers, flash cards, online quizzes, quick writing prompts, etc.Use a variety of question types: fact-based, conceptual, and higher order/transfer.Encourage metacognition by including feedback (right/wrong feedback, explanation feedback, etc.).Remain confident that challenging learning (via retrieval practice) is a good thing!Examine your teaching and studying strategies: Do they focus on getting information “in” or “out?"

How to Turn on the Part of Your Brain That Controls Motivation We know we should put the cigarettes away or make use of that gym membership, but in the moment, we just don’t do it. There is a cluster of neurons in our brain critical for motivation, though. What if you could hack them to motivate yourself? The researchers stuck 73 people into an fMRI, a scanner that can detect what part of the brain is most active, and focused on that area associated with motivation. Character Resources - Let It Ripple When we starting making our first film on character two years ago, called The Science of Character, we talked to countless researchers and educators, and searched across the web and found all sorts of wonderful resources, but we couldn't find one place that aggregated all the ideas around character from different perspectives. So, we decided to start to build one. This catalogue of over 1,600 articles, lessons plans, tools, research, books, films, apps, websites, and games to dive deeper into all the different character strengths and approaches to character development is just the beginning of this journey. We hope you will send ideas to us for each section so that we can grow this together. We are also seeking partners and funds to make this Character Resource Hub as current and beautiful as it can be.

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