background preloader

Redirecting

Redirecting

How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning Editor's Note:Posts about the flipped class on The Daily Riff beginning in January 2011 have generated over 240,000 views to-date - thanks contributors and readers . . . See our other links related to the flipped class below this guest post. Since this post was written, Bergmann and Sams have released their book, Flip your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. How the Flipped Classroom was Born by Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams In 2004, we both started teaching at Woodland Park High School in Woodland Park, Colorado. "And how the Flipped Classroom changes the way teachers talk with parents And then one day our world changed. Flipping Increases Student Interaction One of the greatest benefits of flipping is that overall interaction increases: Teacher to student and student to student. Since the role of the teacher has changed, to more of a tutor than a deliverer of content, we have the privilege of observing students interact with each other. Are you Ready to Flip?

Experimenting with the Mastery Flip.. In the fall of 2011, I piloted 1 class with the flip classroom. In January of 2012, I decided to roll it out with all four sections of 8th grade science and not only that (at this point, I must have lost my mind), I decided to try to the mastery flip technique. I am not going to lie, I spent most if not all of my Christmas break in 2011 assembling the pieces of trial run. Since my school district is not 1 to 1, I had to be creative and design a way that could work for my classroom. I was able to sign a laptop cart out for every Monday and Friday during the course of the unit. I would have loved to have allowed students to try self-pacing, however with the lack of computer access, I struggled with a way to accomplish this. On the Friday, students chose how they wanted to demonstrate what they understood from the week. I was amazed at how much stronger these students understood the concepts compared to past years. However, it wasn't all roses.

The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J. Westerberg The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not by Jon Bergmann, Jerry Overmyer and Brett Wilie There has been a lot of interest in the flipped classroom. The traditional definition of a flipped class is: The Flipped Classroom is NOT: A synonym for online videos. Originally published The Daily Riff July 2011 Jon Bergmann is one of the first teachers to flip his classroom and has recently co-authored a book on the the Flipped Class which is to be published by ISTE press. Video Montage from Conference Below

Before We Flip Classrooms, Let's Rethink What We're Flipping To Integrated into their regular math classes, Globaloria students access online video tutorials and receive expert advice on how to build original educational video games about math topics. Photo credit: World Wide Workshop We're hearing a lot of talk about education in these back-to-school days, but a few conversations rise above the din. One such is the chatter about "flipped classrooms,"1 in which students listen to lectures at home and do homework at school. We also hear names like TED, Codecademy, Khan Academy and Knowmia bandied about, not to mention the term "MOOC"2 and such brands as Udacity, Coursera, MITx, edX . . . No doubt about it, online learning at every level for every purpose is the flavor of the moment, and everyone is scrambling to offer a feast. Before we pick up too much speed to stop, we need to consider the educational future we are aiming for in higher education, technical education, and especially in the early years of K-12 education, when it really counts. Notes

Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped-classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It is a great first step in reframing the role of the teacher in the classroom. It fosters the "guide on the side" mentality and role, rather than that of the "sage of the stage." It also creates the opportunity for differentiated roles to meet the needs of students through a variety of instructional activities. 1) Need to Know How are you creating a need to know the content that is recorded? 2) Engaging Models One of the best way to create the "need to know" is to use a pedagogical model that demands this. 3) Technology What technology do you have to support the flipped classroom? 4) Reflection 5) Time and Place Do you have structures to support this? I know I may have "upset the apple cart" for those who love the flipped classroom.

Engage All Levels of Education You want to use digital learning in your classroom, but how do you start? Today's educational climate puts an increasing emphasis on incorporating technology into student learning, including everyday projects, lessons, skill sets, and online assessments. Watch the recorded presentations, below, from your favorite flipping pioneers at ISTE 2013. Get Education Pricing Try TechSmith tools free for 30-days and save big with education pricing! Learn More >> Learn More about Flipping Use technology to flip your classroom and create the engaging learning environment you've always wanted. Learn More >> Dr. Graham Johnson, Okanagan Mission Secondary Steve Kelly, St. Lori Hochstetler, Northridge Middle School Rob Zdrojewski, Amherst Central Schools Kristin Daniels, Stillwater Area Public Schools Brian Bennett, TechSmith

FlippedLearning - EduVision Cycles of Learning Flipped Classrooms — Tennessee Teaching and Learning Center by guest writer Karen Brinkley If asked to describe a traditional college classroom and style of pedagogy, most people would probably think of students who come to a classroom of chairs in rows to listen to a professor deliver a lecture, and who then did textbook readings and assignments at home. Yet those who have experienced a flipped classroom would describe something completely different. Flipping classrooms is a fairly recent and growing trend sweeping through classrooms across the country. Instead of students coming to class to hear a lecture and work on problems and papers individually at home, the lecture is instead put online for students to watch before class. Read Derek Bruff's blog on mobile classrooms with the instructor and peers through tools like discussion threads and social media. This new trend isn’t limited to high schools, either; in fact, more and more college classrooms are making the switch.

Flipped Classroom A New Learning Revolution There has been a growing buzz around a recently coined phrase " Flipped Classroom". This term starts to take root in education as more and more educators are discovering it. So what is this all about and what are its advantages in learning and teaching? ( Awesome Infographic included below ) Flipped Classroom is an inverted method of instruction where teaching and learning take place online outside of the class while homework is done in the classroom. Flipped Classroom shifts the learning responsibility and ownership from the teacher's hands into the students'. Flipped Classroom depends a lot on educational technology and web 2.0 tools such as podcasting and screencasting applications. "In most Flipped Classrooms, there is an active and intentional transfer of some of the information delivery to outside of the classroom with the goal of freeing up time to make better use of the face-to-face interaction in school. Read the following inforgraphic for more details

Are You Ready to Flip? " . . .not all material is suitable to be taught through a video lesson."Are You Ready to Flip?Part 2 of 3 of "The Flipped Class" by Dan Spencer, Deb Wolf and Aaron Sams Recently there has been increased interest in "best practices" of the flipped classroom in education. Begin with the end in mind. After determining what you want your students to master and how that should look, begin creating (or collecting) quality learning resources. In this process, consider the idea of student choice when creating and collecting these learning resources. If content is delivered outside of class time, it is up to the teacher to provide the students with opportunities in class to place the content they learned into context. student created contentindependent problem solvinginquiry-based activitiesProject Based LearningSome teachers have asked us why videos are necessary if they have engaging class work for their students through which students can learn.

50 Important Links for Common Core Educators Educators across the nation are working hard this summer to begin developing updated curricula that will fit into the new Common Core State Standards, which will be fully applied in 45 U.S. states (Texas, Alaska, Nebraska, Virginia, and Minnesota have opted out of statewide participation) by 2015. Yet despite the hubbub about the new standards, which were created as a means of better equipping students with the knowledge they need to be competitive in the modern world, many teachers still have a lot of unanswered questions about what Common Core will mean for them, their students, and their schools. Luckily, the Internet abounds with helpful resources that can explain the intricacies of Common Core, offer resources for curriculum development, and even let teachers keep up with the latest news on the subject. We’ve collected just a few of those great resources here, which are essential reads for any K-12 educator in a Common Core-adopting state. Groups and Organizations Useful Resources

8 Crucial Resources For Flipped Classrooms Have you “flipped” yet? My colleagues have this week; it’s PSSA week in Pennsylvania (PSSAs are standardized tests.). That’s not the flipped I meant, however. I meant, have you flipped your classroom yet? Well, if you have or are thinking about it, here are some tools you might want to consider using for those after-hours background knowledge sessions. YouTube This might be the most popular tool teachers have used for flipped instruction. You don’t have to establish a class list to allow for student discussion. Other services, such as those that approximate a LMS, require a lot of preparation before a teacher can use it. You can edit the video online (somewhat). Evernote Tutorial as a Cartoon Trim and stabilize Swap audio tracks Change the look of the video (for instance, make it look like a cartoon) Add annotations Add captions Download the new version of the video for offline use It’s easy to share with colleagues, friends, and professional development organizations. Edmodo Schoology

Related: