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The truth about flipped learning

The truth about flipped learning
By Aaron Sams and Brian Bennett Read more by Contributor May 31st, 2012 Ultimately, flipped learning is not about flipping the “when and where” instruction is delivered; it’s about flipping the attention away from the teacher and toward the learner. A flipped classroom is all about watching videos at home and then doing worksheets in class, right? Wrong! Consider carefully the assumptions and sources behind this oversimplified description. Is this the definition promoted by practitioners of flipped classrooms, or sound bites gleaned from short news articles? Many assumptions and misconceptions around the flipped class concept are circulating in educational and popular media. Assumption: Videos have to be assigned as homework. Although video is often used by teachers who flip their class, it is not a prerequisite, and by no means must a video be assigned as homework each night. Resulting misconception: Videos are just recorded lectures.

Flipped Classroom Higher Education "Connected Learning" Connected Learning: Designed to ‘mine the new social, digital domain’ SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- Citing an ever-widening gap between in-school and out-of-school learning experiences, a team of researchers today introduced a model of learning -- ‘connected learning’ -- that taps into the rich new world of information, knowledge, and online collaboration available to youth and learners. The connected learning model, which is anchored in a large body of research on how youth are using social media, the internet and digital media to learn and develop expertise, also seeks to respond to deepening fears of a class-based “equity” gap in education that, without intervention, is likely to be accelerated by disproportionate access to technology and new forms of knowledge sharing. Interest-powered...Research has repeatedly shown that when a subject is personally interesting and relevant, learners achieve much higher-order learning outcomes. ...and the embrace of three key design principles: S.

Structuring materials for online learning: A conceptual model Last September ScHARR (School of Health and Related Research) here at the university offered a brand new programme for distance learning, online postgraduate study: the MSc in International Health Technology Assessment, Pricing and Reimbursement. Catchy title! The course can be taken as a full MSc, Diploma, Certificate or even single module options. It is delivered entirely online as a part-time course for working students. The pedagogical model was derived from the author’s own work for the UK Higher Education Academy (HEA) evaluating student experience within this population (Carroll 2011, 2009). One of the findings of this work was that working students, under pressure from work and domestic responsibilities, responded better, i.e. felt greater control of their learning, when the time available for completing exercises and interacting was not always restricted to a single week. Weeks 1-2 might consist of: Weeks 3-4 might then consist of : Chris Carroll and Luke Miller

eSchool News » Flipped learning: A response to five common criticisms » Print One of the reasons this debate exists is because there is no true definition of what “flipped learning” is. Over the past few years, the Flipped Learning method has created quite a stir. Some argue that this teaching method will completely transform education, while others say it is simply an opportunity for boring lectures to be viewed in new locations. While the debate goes on, the concept of Flipped Learning is not entirely new. Dr. It’s our opinion that one of the reasons this debate exists is because there is no true definition of what Flipped Learning is. Dr.

The Evolution of Classroom Technology Classrooms have come a long way. There’s been an exponential growth in educational technology advancement over the past few years. From overhead projectors to iPads, it’s important to understand not only what’s coming next but also where it all started. We’ve certainly come a long way but some things seem hauntingly similar to many years ago. For example, Thomas Edison said in 1925 that “books will soon be obsolete in schools. Scholars will soon be instructed through the eye.” Also in 1925, there were “schools of the air” that delivered lessons to millions of students simultaneously. Here’s a brief look at the evolution of classroom technology. c. 1650 – The Horn-Book Wooden paddles with printed lessons were popular in the colonial era. c. 1850 – 1870 – Ferule This is a pointer and also a corporal punishment device. 1870 – Magic Lantern The precursor to a slide projector, the ‘magic lantern’ projected images printed on glass plates and showed them in darkened rooms to students. B.

Khan Academy: Learning Habits vs. Content Delivery in STEM Education Email Share March 20, 2012 - by Guest Author 0 Email Share Co-written by David Castillo and Peter McIntosh Most math education analyses in urban high school classrooms focus on delivery of content: What content to deliver, when to deliver it, how to explain it, what textbooks to use, how much home work to assign, and more. Improving content delivery helped, but not enough Oakland Unity High School is a four-year (grades 9-12) public charter high school located in the tough urban neighborhood of East Oakland. In the summer of 2010, we conducted a diagnostic test with all incoming freshman to evaluate basic algebra and arithmetic skills. The number of students scoring below basic (approximately score of 40 percent) decreased from 77 percent to 28 percent. By any reasonable criteria none of the answers to the old questions worked. Poor learning habits revealed the core problem We concluded that the real problem was making those poor habits an excuse for the wrong initiatives.

Flipped Classroom: Beyond the Videos Last week, I read an interesting blog post by Shelley Blake-Plock titled “The Problem with TED ed.” It got me thinking about the flipped classroom model and how it is being defined. As a blended learning enthusiast, I have played with the flipped classroom model, seen presentations by inspiring educators who flip their classrooms, and even have a chapter dedicated to this topic in my book. There are many teachers who do not want to record videos either because they don’t have the necessary skills or equipment, their classes don’t include a lot of lecture that can be captured in recordings, or they are camera shy. Too often the conversation surrounding the flipped classroom focuses on the videos- creating them, hosting them, and assessing student understanding of the content via simple questions or summary assignments. I wish the conversation focused more on what actually happens in a flipped classroom. Blake-Plock makes a strong point when he says we learn by “doing.” 1. 2. 3.

The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J. Westerberg The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not by Jon Bergmann, Jerry Overmyer and Brett Wilie There has been a lot of interest in the flipped classroom. The traditional definition of a flipped class is: The Flipped Classroom is NOT: A synonym for online videos. Originally published The Daily Riff July 2011 Jon Bergmann is one of the first teachers to flip his classroom and has recently co-authored a book on the the Flipped Class which is to be published by ISTE press. Video Montage from Conference Below

Étudiants plagiaires : l'Université vous donne carte blanche Le maître de conférences à l'Université Paris 8 Jean-Noël Darde a publié sur son site Archéologie du copier-coller un article, éminemment dérangeant, qui révèle que plusieurs thèses mises en ligne sur le site de l'Atelier national de Reproduction des Thèses (ANRT) sont... des plagiats avérés. Le plus inquiétant ne réside pas là : tout le contenu pris en charge par l'ANRT est auparavant validé par les jurys et autres commissions universitaires, qui semblent finalement peu regardants sur la légitimité des travaux qui leur sont proposés. Après une lecture attentive et pointilleuse de trois thèses incriminées, l'Archéologie du copier-coller est en mesure de présenter une liste exhaustive des « sources » joyeusement pillées par les auteurs plagiaires (l'une des thèses, avec passages surlignés, est disponible ici) : quand les passages ne sont pas recopiés mot pour mot, la construction est si alambiquée qu'elle ne laisse planer aucun doute sur l'artisanat du patchwork qui la sous-tend.

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