background preloader

Kusudama Tutorial part 2

Kusudama Tutorial part 2
Today I am showing you part 2 of how to make a kusudama ball. You can find the first part here. In part 1, I showed you have to make the individual flowers; you should now have 12 flowers made from 60 individual petals. For part 2 you will need: 12 flowers (made from 60 petals)GlueString or a ribbonBead(s) As you might be able to see from the finished kusudama at the top of the page, I made 6 flowers from blue paper and 6 flowers from a recycled map. Start to glue the flowers together one petal at the time – this will give the nicest result. When you add the 3rd flower, there are 3 petals to connect. After you have attached all 6 flowers you end up with 2 sets of half a kusudama. I used 3 beads on the bottom. Now take one of your 1/2 kusudamas and put some glue on the top. Glue your string down, making sure it is nice and straight. That’s it! In the last photo you can see another kusudama I finished earlier. If you are having a go with this 2 part tutorial we would love to see your work!

http://foldingtrees.com/2008/11/kusudama-tutorial-part-2/

Related:  OrigamiOrigami

Balloon lights tutorial Here in New Zealand we are now in the middle of winter, and when playing around with some LED fairy lights I thought I would combine my love for origami and bringing some winter sparkle to our house. And so the balloon lights were born!! Ok let’s get started with the tutorial! This is what you need for this project: Carambola Flowers by Carmen Sprung If you’ve been following me on Flickr for a while, you’ve probably seen this picture of Carambola Flowers before – I folded them ages ago! But since my Pro account is going to expire in a few days time (and I don’t feel like upgrading it again), a lot of my old photos won’t be displayed anymore. So I decided it would be a good idea to share the very best of them on my blog!

Lucky Wishing Stars Tutorial You’ve probably seen these little puffy origami stars before. They are really quick to make, and you don’t need any special materials to make them. You can buy lucky star pre-cut strips from origami stores, but you can just as easily make your own from medium weight coloured paper, e.g. scrapbooking paper, or even strips cut from magazine pages – as the strips are so narrow, the original text or image won’t be obvious in the finished star. Anti-clockwise from top left: pre-cut strips, paper cutter, scrapbook paper, magazine page. Now on to the tutorial!

DIY Design Community « Keywords: DIY, pendant, lighting, paper Remember those folded up fortune-tellers from your elementary school days? Some kids called them cootie-catchers, but I never really understood the method behind the madness with that one. But I digress, because paper folding prowess was not in vain.

Vintage Paper Placemats {Printable It seems Pretty Blog readers just can’t get enough of their high teas these days! In honour of this truly wonderful tradition making a comeback into weddings and everyday life I’ve created a set of 3 vintage-inspired placemats – each a sweet and simple backdrop for your finest cake plates and tea sets. While I’ve used crisp white paper for my placemats these vintage illustrations will also look great on other soft hues like pale blue, blush and ivory. And if you’re feeling really crafty why not print these in reverse onto transfer paper and iron them onto plain cloth placemats! Happy Crafting! Bianca, Lucky No. 9

Joseph Wu Origami home > diagrams > download For the PDF files, you will need Adobe's Acrobat Reader. These diagrams are sorted by the designer of the model. In the description is also a ranking of the model's difficulty. Creative Kismet » Blog Archive » little guiding stars Since the new year has started I’ve been trying to think of ways to be more kind to my self. Especially when that nasty gremlins try to creep in and stump me. I remembered this origami star video on You Tube and had to get them involved in my plan. I thought it would be fun to make a whole bunch with kind words and “you are….” phrases inside.

Galaxy de l'origami étoiles When my 5 yo goddaughter and I meet up, we love to hand each other our little handmade somethings. She would shower me with sweet girly drawings, scribblings, love notes, masks or a surprise “masterpiece”. Godma would usually make origami iconic symbols. Not long ago I made her a galaxy of stars, one of her favourite shapes. I have complied a list of what I had made to share with you the wonders of star origami. The names of the first 4 stars are given by me as they don’t seem to have formal titles, so I took the liberty to describe them according to what they represent to me, hence they are by no means official.

Tunnel Vision I know you are invited to at least one wedding this summer. Bring your camera. This is a neat way to present a special wedding picture. It's an old paper trick call a tunnel card. I like to frame it in a shadow box and give it to the married couple. Origami Diagrams Folding Help: How to Divide a square or rectangle into 3rds, 5ths or 7ths is here. How to cut a Pentagon from a square is here. How to fold a Stretched Bird Base is here. Paper Money - download a 4x10 inch oversized bill (front and back) for demonstrating money folding to a group. Print it out on light green paper for added realism. Paper Flowers – Anyone Can Do That Japanese Kusudama, this tutorial is featured on Craftuts Anyone can do that, I assure you. The proof: I can, just take a quick look at my result below. And, believe me, I am neither meticulous nor particularly patient. You could even say I’m the opposite. Below you can see my very first attempt to create paper flowers.

Video on How to Make a Kusudama With the Carambola Flower by Carmen Sprung This Kusudama can be considered modular origami, and it is based on a beautiful flower model, folded from a pentagon and originally created by Carmen Sprung (Germany). She calls it “carambola” perhaps because of its resemblance to a cross section of a carambola –also known as star fruit. On her website, Happy Folding, Sara Adams (Germany) presents a video showing how to make a pentagon and how to fold the origami carambola. The folding process, as Sara demonstrates, is both easy and pleasing. The Kusudama structure is that of a dodecahedron and made with twelve pentagonal flowers. It can be used as a holiday decoration or given as given as a handmade Christmas gift.

Related:  Rien que pour les enfantsOrigamiFlowersrobinshri9