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3 Strategies to Improve Student Writing Instantly

3 Strategies to Improve Student Writing Instantly
Editor's Note: A version of this post first appeared on Techie Teacher and Character Coach. "But Miss Parrish, I can't think of anything to write!" Haven't we all heard similar lines in our classrooms? We see hesitant writers sit with a pencil in their hands and a paper on their desks, almost as if they have been handicapped by the task we asked them to do. How is it that some students have so much to say when talking out loud, but when a pencil is put into their hand they suddenly hesitate, struggle and have nothing to say? How can you help those hesitant writers eliminate the "handicap" or barrier that suddenly appears when asked to write? The answer is to simply have them produce "writing" without technically "writing" at all. Strategies That Work 1. Have your student stand up while you sit in his or her seat. 2. Identify a way that your students can audio record themselves "speaking" their essay rather than "writing" it. 3. Communication Before Craft

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Six Amazing Websites that Make Your Writing Stronger Long writing activities are not very frequently done in class. I tend to think that my students are like me; I need the right kind of atmosphere. Writing requires time, silence and lots of inspiration. Ideally, at this time of the year, I would probably wish to be sitting next to a fireplace with the most perfect instagrammable snow falling outside my window while drinking a nice cup of coffee waiting for inspiration to strike. Unfortunately, there isn’t any snow where I live so I’ll have to make do with a bit of rain and some reddish trees. Note: you won’t find “instagrammable” in the dictionary

Making An Outline /** * Simple encryption to hide email addresses from crawlers in webpages. * This code is Free Software provided under an MIT License. * Written by Diego Doval: bnaeQ0bvPXOnZQYgaZqp1ZQO * */ CRLS Research Guide Making An Outline Tip Sheet 14 RESOURCES - Maths worksheets to engage learners following a sports-related vocation Skip to main content Maths worksheets to engage learners following a sports-related vocation - Central College Nottingham Summary This zip file contains sample maths worksheets devised by Central College Nottingham as part of their OTLA project. Topics covered are: fractions, decimals, Resource Type: How to - Teaching, learning and assessment, Learning material Audience: Practitioners, Learning support workers

Ten Tips for Fiction Writers - the important things every novelist should know about writing stories In no particular order: #1) Write what you know More of a mantra than a tip. You'll have heard it before - but it's not about the mantra, it's about the interpretation. Write what you know? That's great if you happen to be a vampire or a serial killer or an A list celebrity. Persuasion Map Helps Students Formulate Persuasive Essays Developing persuasive writing skills is a process that students start in elementary school and continue to develop through high school and beyond. Read Write Think offers a good interactive guide that can help students craft a good persuasive essay. The Persuasion Map asks students to start with a thesis statement before walking them through developing support for that thesis. Students can print their persuasion maps or email them to you. Applications for Education Using Read Write Think's Persuasion Map won't replace the need for your instruction, but it could be helpful to students who need a little assistance after your lesson.

READING - Embedding English: Using your glossary more effectively to develop vocabulary skills Many teachers I meet are using glossaries as a repository for key vocabulary on their courses. It can be helpful to make explicit links between the language in the glossary and your delivery during the course and here are some quick activities to do this: In class, focus on the most difficult words from the glossary – the ones that are jargon, culturally loaded or conceptually complex – and try to explain, exemplify and check them with your groupChoose 7/8 words from the relevant unit in the glossary and get students to test each other – one student explains the word and gives an example and the other checks in the glossary/dictionary. This works well as a revision exercise at the end of a unitMatch up exercises – students match the word to the definition on a card. Try to use the curriculum context in the definition.

Write About - Challenge: Write about peeling a potato for at least 3 paragraphs. I felt the potato in my hands. The skin was smooth, with little dimples where the eyes were. It was about the size of a large orange, with light brownish skin mostly covered by dirt and muck. It fit wonderfully in my hand. Writing the Essay Intro and Conclusion Your essay lacks only two paragraphs now: the introduction and the conclusion. These paragraphs will give the reader a point of entry to and a point of exit from your essay. Introduction The introduction should be designed to attract the reader's attention and give her an idea of the essay's focus. Begin with an attention grabber. The attention grabber you use is up to you, but here are some ideas:Startling information This information must be true and verifiable, and it doesn't need to be totally new to your readers.

READING - Active Listening Active listening is a skill that can be acquired and developed with practice. However, active listening can be difficult to master and will, therefore, take time and patience to develop. 'Active listening' means, as its name suggests, actively listening. That is fully concentrating on what is being said rather than just passively ‘hearing’ the message of the speaker. Active listening involves listening with all senses. Writing Topics Jump to navigation All online writing units are free ($0) during the pandemic. Thank you for teaching! How to Write an Essay This page continues from our page: Planning an Essay, the essential first step to successful essay writing. This page assumes that you have already planned your essay, you have taken time to understand the essay question, gathered information that you intend to use, and have produced a skeleton plan of you essay – taking into account your word limit. This page is concerned with the actual writing of your essay, it provides some guidelines for good practice and also some common mistakes you will want to avoid. Structuring Your Essay An essay should be written in a flowing manner with each sentence following on logically from the previous one and with appropriate signposts to guide the reader. An essay usually takes the following structured format:

20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching - 20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching by TeachThought Staff What makes an effective teacher? Or more specifically, what observable characteristics might you see and hear? The University of Minnesota offered some observable characteristics of effective teaching which, while focused on teacher actions rather than student learning, had some useful tips–not so much how to teach generally, but specific actions that you can use tomorrow. CPD - Learning Objectives A guide to making them effective What is the purpose of learning objectives? Learning objectives should describe what the student will be able to do once they have left your session. They may just be able to do it a little better, they may have begun to grow in confidence with it, or they may have fully mastered it. Learning objectives should not be used to describe activities during the class but the learning taking place; knowledge, skills and/or attributes students gain as a result of being in your lesson.

45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Writers Write is your one-stop resource for writers. Use these 45 ways to avoid using the word ‘very’ to improve your writing. Good writers avoid peppering their writing with qualifiers like ‘very’ and ‘really’. They are known as padding or filler words and generally add little to your writing. According to Collins Dictionary: ‘Padding is unnecessary words or information used to make a piece of writing or a speech longer. Synonyms include: waffle, hot air, verbiage, wordiness.’

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