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Top 50 Dystopian Movies of All Time

Top 50 Dystopian Movies of All Time
Massive dehumanization, totalitarian government, rampant disease, post-apocalyptic terrains, cyber-genetic technologies, societal chaos and widespread urban violence are some of the common themes in dystopian films which bravely examine the ominous shadow cast by future. A dystopia is a fictional society that is the antithesis or complete opposite of a utopia, an ideal world with a perfect social, political and technological infrastructure. A world without chaos, strife or hunger. A world where the individual potential and freedom is celebrated and brought to the forefront. In contrast, the dystopian world is undesirable with poverty and unequal domination by specific individuals over others. Dystopian films often construct a fictional universe and set it in a background which features scenarios such as dehumanizing technological advancements, man-made disasters or class-based revolutions. Ranking the List 50. In the nation of Libria, there is always peace among men. 49. 48. 47. 46. 45.

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Babylon A.D. Babylon A.D. is a 2008 French American science fiction action film based on the novel Babylon Babies by Maurice Georges Dantec. The film was directed by Mathieu Kassovitz and stars Vin Diesel. It was released on 29 August 2008 in the United States. Plot[edit] In 2058, a mercenary named Toorop (Vin Diesel) accepts a contract from a Russian mobster, Gorsky (Gérard Depardieu), who instructs him to bring a young woman known only as Aurora (Mélanie Thierry) to New York City.

Empire's 500 Greatest Movies Of All Time 10,000 Empire readers, 150 of Hollywood's finest and 50 key film critics voted in the most ambitious movie poll evert attempted. 500. Ocean's Eleven (2001) Director: Steven Soderbergh Slick, suave and cooler than a penguin's knackers, Soderbergh's starry update of the Rat Pack crime caper not only outshines its predecessor, but all the lights of The Strip combined.Read our Ocean's Eleven review 499. Saw (2004) The 50 Greatest Cult Movies of All Time It’s midnight somewhere. “Cult movie” is a hard thing to pin down. For the purposes of this list — celebrating the tenth anniversary of Donnie Darko — we’ve put a premium on the intensity and selectiveness of a movie’s appeal. We’ve also limited each director to one film.

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - The Atlantic (July/August 2008) Illustration by Guy Billout "Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave?” So the supercomputer HAL pleads with the implacable astronaut Dave Bowman in a famous and weirdly poignant scene toward the end of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. Gandhi (film) Gandhi is a 1982 epic biographical film which dramatises the life of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the leader of India's non-violent, non-cooperative independence movement against the United Kingdom's rule of the country during the 20th century. Gandhi was a collaboration of British and Indian production companies[3] and was written by John Briley and produced and directed by Richard Attenborough. It stars Ben Kingsley in the titular role. The film covers Gandhi's life from a defining moment in 1893, as he is thrown off a South African train for being in a whites-only compartment, and concludes with his assassination and funeral in 1948. Although a practising Hindu, Gandhi's embracing of other faiths, particularly Christianity and Islam, is also depicted.

The best films of the '00s The scene was not unlike 12 Angry Men (or, in this case, 3 Shlubby Men, 1 Exasperated Woman, And A Dude On Speaker Phone From Arkansas): Armed with lists of their favorite movies of the decade, the five core A.V. Club film writers spent days sequestered in a stuffy, un-air-conditioned room—okay, it was actually just a few hours, and we were comfortable—in an effort to forge consensus on the Top 50 films of the ’00s. The result: A ranked list that is in no way arbitrary and will serve as the canonical standard for decades to come. You’re welcome. 50. m. Wall Street 2 trailer When people think of movies that sum up a decade - or not just that: an attitude and a fixed point in time where capitalism was not only aspirational but hotter than a pair of polyester pants with in-built hot water bottle patches - they turn to Wall Street. It is absolutely of its age. Which was 1987. But now we have Wall Street 2. A film, it seems, also of that age. But set now.

Blade Runner Blade Runner is a 1982 American neo-noir dystopian science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, and Edward James Olmos. The screenplay, written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, is a modified film adaptation of the 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Martin Scorsese's Film School: The 85 Films You Need To See To Know Anything About Film Interviewing Martin Scorsese is like taking a master class in film. Fast Company’s four-hour interview with the director for the December-January cover story was ostensibly about his career, and how he had been able to stay so creative through years of battling studios. But the Hugo director punctuated everything he said with references to movies: 85 of them, in fact, all listed below. Some of the movies he discussed (note: the descriptions for these are below in quotes, denoting his own words). Others he just mentioned (noted below with short plot descriptions and no quotes). But the cumulative total reflects a life lived entirely within the confines of movie making, from his days as a young asthmatic child watching a tiny screen in Queens, New York to today, when Scorsese is as productive as he’s ever been in his career–and more revered than ever by the industry that once regarded him as a troublesome outsider.

The 10 Best Musician Biopics As much as we love music, it always makes the songs a little more interesting to know about the lives that inspired them. When musicians are the subject of a biopic, as they often are, two of our favorite art forms come together: music and dramatic film. Biopics often require some of the most demanding performances from their actors due to the notoriety of their subjects. For a biopic to be successful, it must overcome the difficult challenge of marrying the life of a real person with the structure of a captivating narrative. These 10 films accomplish this feat with some of our favorite musicians as their subjects.

ALL-TIME 100 Movies - TIME You like us, you really like us. You also hate us. Anyway, you click on us, which is the surest way a website has of measuring interest in its content. The All-TIME 100 Movies feature—compiled by Richard Schickel and me, and handsomely packaged by Josh Macht, Mark Coatney and all the smart folks at TIME.com—attracted a record-busting 7.8 million page views in its first week, including 3.5 million on May 23rd, its opening daym, in time for Father’s Day.

The Top 50 Greatest Films of All Time from our September 2012 issue Introduction Ian Christie rings in the changes in our biggest-ever poll. And the loser is – Citizen Kane. After 50 years at the top of the Sight & Sound poll, Orson Welles’s debut film has been convincingly ousted by Alfred Hitchcock’s 45th feature Vertigo – and by a whopping 34 votes, compared with the mere five that separated them a decade ago. So what does it mean? Limits to Growth was right. New research shows we're nearing collapse The 1972 book Limits to Growth, which predicted our civilisation would probably collapse some time this century, has been criticised as doomsday fantasy since it was published. Back in 2002, self-styled environmental expert Bjorn Lomborg consigned it to the “dustbin of history”. It doesn’t belong there.

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