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Vangelis

Vangelis
Having had a career in music spanning over 50 years and having composed and performed more than 52 albums, Vangelis is one of the most important exponents of electronic music.[3][4][5] Biography[edit] Formative years[edit] When the teachers asked me to play something, I would pretend that I was reading it and play from memory. I didn't fool them, but I didn't care.[6] Work in bands[edit] Early solo works[edit] Solo career[edit] Notable film work[edit] Chariots of Fire[edit] In 1981, Vangelis wrote the score for the film Chariots of Fire, set at the 1924 Summer Olympics. Blade Runner[edit] In 1982, Vangelis collaborated with director Ridley Scott, to write the score for the science fiction film Blade Runner.[23] Capturing the isolation and melancholy of Harrison Ford's character, Rick Deckard, the Vangelis score is as much a part of the dystopian environment as the decaying buildings and ever-present rain.[24] 1492: Conquest of Paradise[edit] Other works[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vangelis

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