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Personal learning environment

Personal learning environment
Personal Learning Environments (PLE) are systems that help learners take control of and manage their own learning.[1] This includes providing support for learners to: Set their own learning goals.Manage their learning, both content and process.Communicate with others in the process of learning. A PLE represents the integration of a number of "Web 2.0" technologies like blogs, Wikis, RSS feeds, Twitter, Facebook, etc. around the independent learner. Using the term "e-learning 2.0", Stephen Downes describes the PLE as: "... one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications—an environment rather than a system".[2] See More[edit] External links[edit] References[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_learning_environment

Related:  PLE Personalized Learning EnvironmentPLEPersonal Learning Environment & PL NetworkPLELearning Environments

Community of practice A community of practice (CoP) is a group of people who share a craft and/or a profession. The concept was first proposed by cognitive anthropologist Jean Lave and educational theorist Etienne Wenger in their 1991 book Situated Learning (Lave & Wenger 1991). Wenger then significantly expanded on the concept in his 1998 book Communities of Practice (Wenger 1998). A CoP can evolve naturally because of the members' common interest in a particular domain or area, or it can be created deliberately with the goal of gaining knowledge related to a specific field. It is through the process of sharing information and experiences with the group that members learn from each other, and have an opportunity to develop personally and professionally (Lave & Wenger 1991).

Virtual learning environment A virtual learning environment (VLE), or learning platform, is an e-learning education system based on the web that models conventional in-person education by providing equivalent virtual access to classes, class content, tests, homework, grades, assessments, and other external resources such as academic or museum website links. It is also a social space where students and teacher can interact through threaded discussions or chat. It typically uses Web 2.0 tools for 2-way interaction, and includes a content management system. Virtual learning environments are the basic components of contemporary distance learning, but can also be integrated with a physical learning environment[1] which may be referred to as blended learning. Virtual learning can take place synchronously or asynchronously. In synchronous systems, participants meet in “real time”, and teachers conduct live classes in virtual classrooms.

Personal Learning Networks (PLN) = An Attitude of Gratitude Anyone who believes they got where they are by her- or himself is pretty much lying. We all have someone who helped us get here. In my case, I have a whole host of “someones”. And I would be remiss if I didn’t say so. I hope you know who you are, as they are too numerous to mention here. PLE : iTeachU Information Fluency provides a model for educational activities; the Personal Learning Environment (PLE) is the place where those activities happen. Just as learning activities and their products map to the three areas that comprise Information Fluency, those activities and their products can be mapped to different tools and resources. About the “PLE” Personal The PLE is personal because the people, applications, tools, resources, and services are chosen to match our individual, idiosyncratic needs. Each is adopted and discarded according to our needs and whims.

Teach Abroad: Teach English Abroad with Footprints Recruiting I think that we can all relate to sitting in a class trying not to nod off or listening to an instructor who is brilliant in a particular field but who has no ability to engage students. As adult learners this is often something that we can overcome through self-motivation. We can be motivated by genuine interest in the subject or by the urge to get enough credits to graduate – either way works. Younger students, however, often do not have a high degree of self-motivation – they are in your class, most likely, because their parents enrolled them. In these types of cases it is up to you, the teacher, to create a positive classroom environment that is going to engage and motivate your students externally. Teaching Jobs in Dubai

35 Ways To Build Your Personal Learning Network Online Personal learning networks are a great way for educators to get connected with learning opportunities, access professional development resources, and to build camaraderie with other education professionals. Although PLNs have been around for years, in recent years social media has made it possible for these networks to grow exponentially. Now, it’s possible to expand and connect your network around the world anytime, anywhere. But how exactly do you go about doing that? Check out our guide to growing your personal learning network with social media, full of more than 30 different tips, ideas, useful resources, and social media tools that can make it all possible.

Situated learning Situated learning was first proposed by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger as a model of learning in a community of practice. At its simplest, situated learning is learning that takes place in the same context in which it is applied. Lave and Wenger (1991)[1] argue that learning should not be viewed as simply the transmission of abstract and decontextualised knowledge from one individual to another, but a social process whereby knowledge is co-constructed; they suggest that such learning is situated in a specific context and embedded within a particular social and physical environment. Lave and Wenger[edit] Lave and Wenger assert that situated learning "is not an educational form, much less a pedagogical strategy".[2] However, since their writing, others have advocated different pedagogies that include situated activity: Many of the original examples from Lave and Wenger[1] concerned adult learners, and situated learning still has a particular resonance for adult education.

Your Most Powerful Search Engine is Your Personal Learning Network (PLN) The use of search engines like Google, Yahoo, or Bing for research is commonplace in today’s online world. In fact, many of us go to these sites instantly when the need to find something first arises, be it something as trivial as finding out when a movie is playing, or as part of a multi-million dollar workplace project. These search engines have redefined how we find information, and quickly become the primary way in which many people perform research. But not for me. I still use these search engines for low-impact searches. However, when there is more consequence to my research, I am increasingly calling upon a different type of search engine for my research: my Personal Learning Network, or PLN.

How To Create a PLE to Stay Relevant in 2013 “Our understanding of learning has expanded at a rate that has far outpaced our conceptions of teaching. A growing appreciation for the porous boundaries between the classroom and life experience…has created not only promising changes but also disruptive moments in teaching.” EDUCAUSE Review, 2012 This quote from Disrupting Ourselves: The Problem of Learning in Higher Education (Bass, 2012), gives a good a reason as any for educators to develop a Personal learning Environment [PLE]; a space where we can keep up with the experimental modes of learning, instruction, changing pedagogy and instructional methods that surfaced in 2012. In a previous post I introduced the concept of PLEs and touched on why educators may want to consider developing a PLE for 2013. In this post I’ll outline how educators can develop their own PLE, where to start, and I’ll provide specific action steps, and what tools to use.

Educational Leadership:The Positive Classroom:Seven Strategies for Building Positive Classrooms The Positive Action program shows that we can promote academic achievement and build students' character. Every day as millions of students go to school, their parents and caretakers hope these young people will be treated with care, valued, inspired, and educated. Students hope they will get along with their peers and teachers, have their work measure up, and enjoy the process of learning. These hopes define positive classrooms for parents and students.

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