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Personal learning environment

Personal learning environment
Personal Learning Environments (PLE) are systems that help learners take control of and manage their own learning.[1] This includes providing support for learners to: Set their own learning goals.Manage their learning, both content and process.Communicate with others in the process of learning. A PLE represents the integration of a number of "Web 2.0" technologies like blogs, Wikis, RSS feeds, Twitter, Facebook, etc. around the independent learner. Using the term "e-learning 2.0", Stephen Downes describes the PLE as: "... one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications—an environment rather than a system".[2] See More[edit] External links[edit] References[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_learning_environment

Virtual learning environment A virtual learning environment (VLE), or learning platform, is an e-learning education system based on the web that models conventional in-person education by providing equivalent virtual access to classes, class content, tests, homework, grades, assessments, and other external resources such as academic or museum website links. It is also a social space where students and teacher can interact through threaded discussions or chat. It typically uses Web 2.0 tools for 2-way interaction, and includes a content management system. Virtual learning environments are the basic components of contemporary distance learning, but can also be integrated with a physical learning environment[1] which may be referred to as blended learning. Virtual learning can take place synchronously or asynchronously. In synchronous systems, participants meet in “real time”, and teachers conduct live classes in virtual classrooms.

Personal Learning Networks (PLN) = An Attitude of Gratitude Anyone who believes they got where they are by her- or himself is pretty much lying. We all have someone who helped us get here. In my case, I have a whole host of “someones”. And I would be remiss if I didn’t say so. I hope you know who you are, as they are too numerous to mention here. Why Academics Should Blog: A College of One’s Own Every now and then I make the mistake of confessing to a colleague that I blog. They usually greet this confession with an uneasy smile and follow it with a look that says: “do you really have time for that?” I understand what they really mean: a serious tenure track assistant professor does not have time for blogging. With respect to my colleagues, they’re wrong: graduate students, post-docs, young faculty, and senior faculty too, should do more blogging not less.

Situated learning Situated learning was first proposed by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger as a model of learning in a community of practice. At its simplest, situated learning is learning that takes place in the same context in which it is applied. Lave and Wenger (1991)[1] argue that learning should not be viewed as simply the transmission of abstract and decontextualised knowledge from one individual to another, but a social process whereby knowledge is co-constructed; they suggest that such learning is situated in a specific context and embedded within a particular social and physical environment. Lave and Wenger[edit] Lave and Wenger assert that situated learning "is not an educational form, much less a pedagogical strategy".[2] However, since their writing, others have advocated different pedagogies that include situated activity: Many of the original examples from Lave and Wenger[1] concerned adult learners, and situated learning still has a particular resonance for adult education.

Your Most Powerful Search Engine is Your Personal Learning Network (PLN) The use of search engines like Google, Yahoo, or Bing for research is commonplace in today’s online world. In fact, many of us go to these sites instantly when the need to find something first arises, be it something as trivial as finding out when a movie is playing, or as part of a multi-million dollar workplace project. These search engines have redefined how we find information, and quickly become the primary way in which many people perform research. But not for me. I still use these search engines for low-impact searches. However, when there is more consequence to my research, I am increasingly calling upon a different type of search engine for my research: my Personal Learning Network, or PLN.

Social learning theory is a perspective that states that people learn within a social context. It is facilitated through concepts such as modeling and observational learning. [ 1 ] [ edit ] Theory According to Social Learning theory, models are an important source for learning new behaviors and for achieving behavioral change in institutionalized settings. [ 2 ] Social learning theory is derived from the work of Albert Bandura which proposed that observational learning can occur in relation to three models: [ 3 ] • Live model – in which an actual person is demonstrating the desired behaviour

Building a Personal Learning Network (PLN) by Jane Bozarth “Simply showing up is not enough. As with most things in life, you get back what you put in. If you want to build a Personal Learning Network, then you must be an active part of that network; it’s not a spectator sport.” Since Social Media for Trainers was published I’ve fielded lots of questions about incorporating social media tools into workplace learning endeavors. Another question that comes up relates to the developmental needs of trainers and instructional designers: What are some strategies for building or extending your own Personal Learning Network (PLN) via social media tools? Here are a few ideas. Technology I Use Everyday as an Educator Recently, a colleague asked me what technology I use each day and how does it help me or my students. So, here is my answer: (all of them are free) 1. Email - I use email for communication. All of my students have my school email address, and I give it out to parents also.

How to Create a Robust and Meaningful Personal Learning Network [PLN] This post describes how educators can develop a personal learning network that supports meaningful and relevant learning. The MOOC, Education Technology & Media, etmooc, is used here as a working example of how to develop a PLN. “My Personal Learning Network is the key to keeping me up-to-date with all the changes that are happening in education and how technology can best support and engage today’s students.” Brian Metcalfe: teacher, blogger at lifelonglearners.com A visual image of participants in an open, online course- etmooc, which shows the potential to find and create personal connections as part of one’s PLN. (image credit: Alec Couros)

Using Twitter as a Professional Development Tool Last week during a discussion about design, Jeanette Campos asked me a fairly is simple question: What are the three artifacts that have shaped you most as a designer of creative learning solutions to complex problems? Immediately one word came to mind: Twitter. It isn't the tool itself that has been so impact full for me; it's the world to which Twitter opened up to me. I started my career as a learning and performance professional much the same way many in our field do: without any training or education on what it means to work in this field.

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