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Copyright Advisory Office

Copyright Advisory Office

http://copyright.columbia.edu/copyright/

Related:  Addy Baker's PLNethical use in the 21st centuryGuides et Resources UtilisateursTraining Materials

Position Statement on the Confidentiality of Library Records The members of the American Library Association,* recognizing the right to privacy of library users, believe that records held in libraries which connect specific individuals with specific resources, programs or services, are confidential and not to be used for purposes other than routine record keeping: i.e., to maintain access to resources, to assure that resources are available to users who need them, to arrange facilities, to provide resources for the comfort and safety of patrons, or to accomplish the purposes of the program or service. The library community recognizes that children and youth have the same rights to privacy as adults. Libraries whose record keeping systems reveal the names of users would be in violation of the confidentiality of library record laws adopted in many states.

Ethical Issues ALA's Position Statement on the Confidentiality of Library Records The ethical responsibilities of librarians, as well as statues in most states and the District of Columbia, protect the privacy of library users. This statement outlines the beliefs of the American Library Association on the issue of patron confidentiality. American Library Association Code of Ethics The ALA Code of Ethics are the principles that guide the work of librarians, other professionals providing information services, library trustees, and library support staffs. The principles are expressed in broad statements which provide a framework to guide ethical decision making. IFLA's World Code of Ethics by Country The International Federation of Library Association and Institutions monitors the state of intellectual freedom within the library community world-wide.

The Common Law and Civil Law Traditions Most nations today follow one of two major legal traditions: common law or civil law. The common law tradition emerged in England during the Middle Ages and was applied within British colonies across continents. The civil law tradition developed in continental Europe at the same time and was applied in the colonies of European imperial powers such as Spain and Portugal. Civil law was also adopted in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by countries formerly possessing distinctive legal traditions, such as Russia and Japan, that sought to reform their legal systems in order to gain economic and political power comparable to that of Western European nation-states. To an American familiar with the terminology and process of our legal system, which is based on English common law, civil law systems can be unfamiliar and confusing. Common law is generally uncodified.

Reference & User Services Association (RUSA) This brief guide is designed to help students and researchers find and evaluate primary sources available online. Keep in mind as you use this website, the Web is always changing and evolving. If you have questions, please consult your instructor or librarian. Primary sources are the evidence of history, original records or objects created by participants or observers at the time historical events occurred or even well after events, as in memoirs and oral histories.

When Futures Thinking Meets Design Thinking (this post was originally featured on core77) image by erica glasier The business world has been quick to try and implement design thinking in hopes of stimulating sweeping organizational change and innovation, only to abandon it and return to old practices when it doesn’t “work.” Is design thinking nothing more than a poorly defined gimmick, or are people just missing the big picture? Plagiarism Quiz 9-10: Master You're a plagiarism expert! Continue writing originally and bolstering ideas with properly cited sources. Tweet how awesome you are and share it with your classmates, friends, or instructors!

Punctuation, symbols & operators in search - Search Help You can use search operators and other punctuation to get more specific search results. Except for the examples below, Google Search usually ignores punctuation. Punctuation & symbols Even though you can use the punctuation marks below when you search, including them doesn’t always improve the results. If we don't think the punctuation will give you better results, you'll see suggested results for that search without punctuation. Search operators Joyce Valenza on Pinterest Log in Home Categories There’s more to see... Come take a look at what else is here! Joyce Valenza Plagiarism Tutorial: Test Your Knowledge Plagiarism is a serious academic offense! The University of Southern Mississippi's undergraduate and graduate bulletins both include statements about plagiarism: "When cheating is discovered, the faculty member may give the student an F on the work involved or in the course. If further disciplinary action is deemed appropriate, the undergraduate student should be reported to the Dean of Students. A graduate student should be reported to the Dean of the Graduate School." "In addition to being a violation of academic honesty, cheating violates the code of student conduct and may be grounds for probation, suspension, expulsion, or all three."

12 Ways to Be More Search Savvy Google has made it possible for us to have instant information gratification. Just start typing the first letters of your search word and the site intuits your question and offers you the smartest choice of answers. Seems simple enough. But as quick and facile as the process is, there are ways to be even more efficient, more search-savvy. What’s our future – school libraries and librarians It disturbs me that we are not seriously thinking about the future of school libraries. This statement will receive incensed objections; teacher librarians are, after all, talking about changes in what we do and how we do it at conferences and in their own libraries. We talk about some of these changes in my own school library – delivering ebooks, providing transferable skills such as critical literacies to our students, delivering online resources. Well shoot me down if I upset you but I still think we’re not getting it.

Topics of the Times Note: This lesson was originally published on an older version of The Learning Network; the link to the related Times article will take you to a page on the old site. Overview of Lesson Plan: In this lesson, students will compare and contrast Times Topics pages with Wikipedia as potential sources of information and use Times Topics pages to tackle classroom research questions. ( Click here for a companion lesson for Grades 3-5.) Authors: Top 50 School Library Blogs One look at the titles of blogs narrated by school librarians reveals the evolution of a profession within an institution that is at a pivotal point. Charged with the vital duty of promoting digital literacy, today’s librarians are daring, unquiet, sassy and definitely e-literate. This list features the top school library blogs ordered by website popularity metrics and social media engagement including the number of websites that link to a blog and number of followers on Twitter.

A Way With Words Note: This lesson was originally published on an older version of The Learning Network; the link to the related Times article will take you to a page on the old site. Overview of Lesson Plan: In this lesson, students will examine the case of a particular author accused of stealing another author’s work. They then create plagiarized pieces of work and reflect on the writing process. Author(s): Michelle Sale, The New York Times Learning Network Javaid Khan, The Bank Street College of Education in New York City Suggested Time Allowance: 1 hour Objectives:Students will: 1.

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