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Virtual learning environment

Virtual learning environment
A virtual learning environment (VLE), or learning platform, is an e-learning education system based on the web that models conventional in-person education by providing equivalent virtual access to classes, class content, tests, homework, grades, assessments, and other external resources such as academic or museum website links. It is also a social space where students and teacher can interact through threaded discussions or chat. It typically uses Web 2.0 tools for 2-way interaction, and includes a content management system. Virtual learning environments are the basic components of contemporary distance learning, but can also be integrated with a physical learning environment[1] which may be referred to as blended learning. Virtual learning can take place synchronously or asynchronously. In synchronous systems, participants meet in “real time”, and teachers conduct live classes in virtual classrooms. Major Components Of Virtual Learning Environment[edit] Similar terms[edit] Purpose[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_learning_environment

Related:  PLE

Personal learning environment Personal Learning Environments (PLE) are systems that help learners take control of and manage their own learning.[1] This includes providing support for learners to: Set their own learning goals.Manage their learning, both content and process.Communicate with others in the process of learning. A PLE represents the integration of a number of "Web 2.0" technologies like blogs, Wikis, RSS feeds, Twitter, Facebook, etc. around the independent learner. Using the term "e-learning 2.0", Stephen Downes describes the PLE as: "... one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications—an environment rather than a system".[2]

What is virtual learning environment (VLE) or managed learning environment (MLE A virtual learning environment (VLE) is a set of teaching and learning tools designed to enhance a student's learning experience by including computers and the Internet in the learning process. The principal components of a VLE package include curriculum mapping (breaking curriculum into sections that can be assigned and assessed), student tracking, online support for both teacher and student, electronic communication (e-mail, threaded discussions, chat, Web publishing), and Internet links to outside curriculum resources. In general, VLE users are assigned either a teacher ID or a student ID. The teacher sees what a students sees, but the teacher has additional user rights to create or modify curriculum content and track student performance. There are a number of commercial VLE software packages available, including Blackboard, WebCT, Lotus LearningSpace, and COSE.

Effective Learning and the Virtual Learning Environment Effective Learning and the Virtual Learning Environment M J Stiles The Learning Development Centre, Staffordshire University, UK Abstract Using Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) poses important educational issues for Universities. Without addressing the issues of effective learning, their use can compound the mistakes of the past and leave the learner with a passive, unengaging experience leading to surface learning.

Situated learning Situated learning was first proposed by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger as a model of learning in a community of practice. At its simplest, situated learning is learning that takes place in the same context in which it is applied. Lave and Wenger (1991)[1] argue that learning should not be viewed as simply the transmission of abstract and decontextualised knowledge from one individual to another, but a social process whereby knowledge is co-constructed; they suggest that such learning is situated in a specific context and embedded within a particular social and physical environment. Lave and Wenger[edit] Lave and Wenger assert that situated learning "is not an educational form, much less a pedagogical strategy".[2] However, since their writing, others have advocated different pedagogies that include situated activity:

Online Learning: The Pros And Cons Of K-12 Computer Courses Online learning is one of the fastest growing trends in educational uses of technology, according to a 2010 report by the U.S. Department of Education. But the rapid growth raises the question do students get as much out of online learning as they do from face-to-face lessons with a teacher? More than one million K-12 students took online courses during the 2007-08 school year. And with cuts to education spending escalating in recent years, online instruction is one option getting increasing attention as school districts look for ways to cut costs. Social learning theory is a perspective that states that people learn within a social context. It is facilitated through concepts such as modeling and observational learning. [ 1 ] [ edit ] Theory According to Social Learning theory, models are an important source for learning new behaviors and for achieving behavioral change in institutionalized settings. [ 2 ] Social learning theory is derived from the work of Albert Bandura which proposed that observational learning can occur in relation to three models: [ 3 ]

eLearning & Deliberative Moments: The present and future of Personal Learning Environments (PLE) This post is recast from an assignment I completed about four months ago in a Masters Degree course entitled Innovative Practice and Emerging ICT, in which I investigated what PLEs are meant to be and where they might be going. It was originally part of a class wiki. Contents Introduction A definition for the term Personal Learning Environment (PLE), remains elusive. Conception about what should constitute a PLE depends on the perspective of the commentator. Personal learning environment This article or chapter is incomplete and its contents need further attention. Some information may be missing or may be wrong, spelling and grammar may have to be improved, use your judgment! Page created by Daniel K. Schneider, 25 April 2007Contributors: Grob x1, Kalli x9Last modified by Daniel K.

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