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Finding your voice - making your writing sound like YOU

Finding your voice - making your writing sound like YOU
Finding your voice by Christopher Meeks Developing a voice in your writing is a notion that passes over me every now and then like the "thung" sound of an error message on my computer. "I should develop a voice," I think. "My voice is off today," I think. "Maybe I should work on that voice thing," I think. To some people, the image of "voice" may be akin to a rotund person belting something out in Italian in front of a lot of penguin-suited people paying big bucks waiting for the crystal to shatter. Or, if that metaphor's a bit too extreme, think of "voice" as simply like your own voice. Since most of the information on the Web is text, you want your text to have a real voice, like your own. I can recognize voice in other people's work. One of the great voices of the century is Ernest Hemingway. Is there a way to work on "voice"? OK, we aren't Hemingway... We all want to change the way the next few generations speak, write, and think. How do we do that? Most days I don't worry about voice.

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Character Trait Chart Character Trait Chart and Personality Components It can sometimes be helpful to make a Trait Chart for each character. This is especially helpful during the early stages of character development, before the character becomes as real to you as your mother. Online - Fifty Writing Tools: What's in Store For the last two years, these 50 essays describing writing strategies have lived on the Poynter Web site, helping journalists improve their craft. Your support for these writing tools has led to two exciting developments. The publisher Little, Brown plans a Sept. 1, 2006 launch for the book version: Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer. (If you pre-order the book from Amazon here, Poynter will get a small cut as an Amazon affiliate.)

The 14 best blogging and publishing platforms on the Internet today. Which one is for you? Want the latest recommendations? Read our 2015 guide to The 18 best blogging and publishing platforms on the internet today. Updated June 2014 Creat a Character Exercises Getting to Know your Characters Create a character or get to know him better with these creative writing exercises. Well written characters engage the reader and make him feel as though he has made a new friend. 1. Read! Novel Writing Help The chances are that you already have a talent for prose. Writing a novel probably wouldn't have occurred to you in the first place if you didn't have a way with words and were incapable of writing prose with style. I'm not talking about the ability to produce poetic language here, or the kind of writing you have to read again and again to marvel at its beauty.

25 Things You Should Know About Word Choice 1. A Series Of Word Choices Here’s why this matters: because both writing and storytelling comprise, at the most basic level, a series of word choices. Words are the building blocks of what we do. Creating an Original Character By Maisha Foster-O'Neal You've heard the old maxim before... 'a character can make or break your story.' Okay, okay, so you want to write an interesting character. You've got some plot ideas, you know a little bit about your world, but now you need your characters. And not just any old characters - no, these have got to be the most original, most interesting characters your reader will ever come across. The Art of Descriptive Writing Why is descriptive writing so important in a novel? Because unlike movies, novels are not visual. When you watch a film, all of the "description" is done for you by a camera and a microphone. All writers have are words. So you need to use those words to help the reader see and hear (and smell, taste and touch, too).

5 Ways to Get Rid of Your Damn Empty Modifiers I discussed the need to get rid of empty emphatics when I gave you 8 words to seek and destroy in your writing, but just saying that you should get rid of a thing doesn't say much about the right way to do so. Today I'm going to show you a few of my favorite ways to get rid of your empty modifiers. What exactly is an empty modifier? It's any word whose only role is to intensify the word it's modifying. Character Chart for Fiction Writers - If you're a fiction writer -- whether you're working on a novel, short story, screenplay, television series, play, web series, webserial, or blog-based fiction -- your characters should come alive for your reader or audience. The highly detailed chart below will help writers develop fictional characters who are believable, captivating, and unique. Print this page to complete the form for each main character you create. IMPORTANT: Note that all fields are optional and should be used simply as a guide; character charts should inspire you to think about your character in new ways, rather than constrain your writing.

9 Rules For Writing Dialogue Want to know the most important thing about writing dialogue in fiction? If it sounds like a conversation you'd hear in the real world, you've gone horribly wrong somewhere. Seriously. Character Profile Templates Enter your e-mail to get the e-book for FREE. We'll also keep you informed about interesting website news. "I have searched the web and used different worksheets, but none have come close to your worksheets and descriptions of (what to do and what not to do). Both courses I have taken have with Creative Writing Now have been amazing. Overcome Writer's Block, Suggestions To Get You Writing Again. ^ Back to top We use cookies, just to track visits to our website, we store no personal details. ACCEPT COOKIES What are cookies? Login Overcoming Writer’s Block Writer’s Block can stop your creative efforts in their tracks and overcoming writer’s block is a tough task.

The Complete Guide to Interior Monologue Interior monologue is the fancy literary term for a character's thoughts in a novel. In real life, the stream of thoughts we all have running through our heads at any given moment is more often referred to as internal monologue, though the two terms mean precisely the same thing. While we are dealing with definitions, a couple of closely-related literary terms are... Stream of Consciousness. This is where an entire novel, or at least large chunks of a novel, takes the form of the central character's thoughts. Such novels tend to be light on plot, so I wouldn't recommend this device.