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Teaching Literary Analysis

Teaching Literary Analysis
Literary analysis is a vital stage in the development of students' critical thinking skills. Bloom's Taxonomy illustrates that analysis should come at the fourth level, right after comprehension and application. What this means is that students must be able to understand and describe the text before they are able to analyze its elements. Teaching literary analysis is often a daunting and overwhelming task. After all, it is essentially guiding students slowly through the process of critical thinking and understanding literature. That’s not a simple undertaking. To guide students toward discovering literature all on their own, the steps of this process need to be introduced in a simplified form. 1. Some students need guidance when choosing a topic, but others have ideas that they would like to explore. Characters Themes Literary devices Setting Narrative. 2. The brainstorming process involves mapping out the different aspects of the chosen element. 3. 4. Introduce Evidence Analyze 5. Related:  Studying literature in the FL classroomUseful linksReading

Teaching materials: using literature in the EFL/ ESL classroom By Lindsay Clandfield An article discussing ways to use literature in the EFL/ESL classroom. Literature has been a subject of study in many countries at a secondary or tertiary level, but until recently has not been given much emphasis in the EFL/ESL classroom. What is literature? literature / noun 1. stories, poems, and plays, especially those that are considered to have value as art and not just entertainment (c) Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2003 Many authors, critics and linguists have puzzled over what literature is. Before doing any study of a literary text with your learners, one idea would be to ask them what they think literature is. Why use literature? There are many good reasons for using literature in the classroom. Literature is authentic material. Different models of teaching literature in class There have been different models suggested on the teaching of literature to ESL/EFL students (Carter & Long, Lazar). The cultural model views a literary text as a product. Using poems

21 Phrases You Use Without Realizing You’re Quoting Shakespeare William Shakespeare devised new words and countless plot tropes that still appear in everyday life. Famous quotes from his plays are easily recognizable; phrases like "To be or not to be," "wherefore art thou, Romeo," and "et tu, Brute?" instantly evoke images of wooden stages and Elizabethan costumes. iStock "Nay, if our wits run the wild-goose chase, I am done, for thou hast more of the wild-goose in one of thy wits than, I am sure, I have in my whole five. This term didn't originally refer to actual geese, but rather a type of horse race. "O, beware, my lord, of jealousy! Before Shakespeare, the color green was most commonly associated with illness. "Be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny. "Lawn as white as driven snow." — Autolycus Though Shakespeare never actually used the full phrase "pure as the driven snow," both parts of it appear in his work. "If? "Now tell me how long you would have her after you have possessed her." — Rosalind [Thersites exits]

A Hunger for Dystopia: Critical Thinking on the Journey to Self-Discovery I was in high school in the mid '90s when I first read George Orwell's dystopian novel 1984. It lifted the veil of my childhood innocence, opening my eyes to the injustices of the adult world. Once I finished the chilling, final sentence of the novel, there was no going back to my naive self. New dystopian books are dominating the bestseller list. 2013 was officially the year of Divergent. 1984 helped me uncover dark truths about the adult world. Today's stories resonate with teenagers in a similar way. Dystopian novels belong in our classrooms because they hold a mirror up to our fears and flaws. For those of you that read 1984, Fahrenheit 451, or Brave New World in high school, here are five updates to the dystopian genre that will captivate you and your students. The Handmaid's Tale Margret Atwood wrote this shortly after the conservative revival of the 1980s, just as Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher assumed power. The Giver Feed The Hunger Games Divergent . . .

L’EMILE/CLIL en Europe Comment est né le concept d'EMILE en Europe ? Comment nos voisins européens envisagent-ils cet enseignement spécifique et comment le mettent-ils en œuvre dans leurs systèmes éducatifs respectifs ? Cette page vous invite à un Tour de l'EMILE en Europe pour faire le point sur ces différentes questions. L'EMILE en Europe : mise en perspective historique Depuis deux décennies, l'Europe a fait preuve d'un volontarisme exceptionnel en faveur de l'éducation bi-/plurilingue et de l´Enseignement de Matières par l´Intégration d´une Langue Étrangère (désormais EMILE). Carte interactive de l'EMILE en Europe Une Visite d'étude consacrée à l'EMILE/CLIL a été organisée au Centre international d'études pédagogiques (CIEP) avec l'Agence 2E2F. Remarque : ce dossier, fruit d'un travail collaboratif, n'est pas exhaustif. Ressources complémentaires Autres systèmes éducatifs bilingues ou plurilingues L'enseignement des langues vivantes en Europe Trois documents à consulter :

A Good Visual On Bloom's Taxonomy Vs Depth of Knowledge December 5, 2014 Bloom's taxonomy and Depth of Knowledge are two popular conceptual learning frameworks. They both approach the learning process from relatively different stands:Bloom's taxonomy seem to emphasize the categorization of tasks in a way that corresponds with students thinking levels ( e,g knowing, understanding, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating). Depth of Knowledge (DOK), on the hand, shifts the focus from the product or end result to focusing on the cognitive and thinking process. It extends beyond the what and digs deeper into the how. Here is a beautiful visual I came across today on this Pinterest board and which illustrates the difference between Blooms' taxonomy and Depth of Knowledge. Mentoring Minds provides a free downloadable version of this graphic from this page.

Understand what you read Assessment in the multi-level classroom It can be tricky to test classes of students who come from very different learning backgrounds. Stacey Hughes, teacher trainer in the Professional Development team at Oxford University Press, offers some advice. Testing and assessment are important in any classroom. In addition to the obvious goal of finding out if students have learned what is required for the end of term or year, assessment also gives teachers information about what students might need more work on. It can also motivate students to study, giving them a sense of achievement as they learn (Ur:1996). A multilevel class poses additional challenges to the teacher. 1. You could consider setting individualised targets (or get your students to set their own). a) Choose the 5 key words you think are absolutely necessary for all students to learn, several more that would be good for them to learn and a final few that would be great if they could learn. 2. Your master list should be comprehensive and cover all language areas. a.

Home - World Stories EdTech Implementation Guide - Part 1: Creating a Tech Integration Vision About ETR Community EdTechReview (ETR) is a community of and for everyone involved in education technology to connect and collaborate both online and offline to discover, learn, utilize and share about the best ways technology can improve learning, teaching, and leading in the 21st century. EdTechReview spreads awareness on education technology and its role in 21st century education through best research and practices of using technology in education, and by facilitating events, training, professional development, and consultation in its adoption and implementation.

ESL English Listening & Adult Literacy - News - Audiobooks - Songs - Radio Dramas 1) Without Your Memories, Are You Really Still You? (Listening time = 28 - 25 minutes - depending on chosen listening speed) 2) Bring Back the Woolly Mammoth! (Listening time = 10 - 13 minutes - depending on chosen listening speed) 3) DNA Tests, the Golden State Killer and Your Privacy (Listening time = 11 - 14 minutes - depending on chosen listening speed) 4) To Keep Women From Dying In Childbirth, Look To California (Listening time = 14 - 18 minutes - depending on chosen listening speed) 5) 70 Years Of Life In Mosul (Listening time = 8 - 10 minutes - depending on chosen listening speed) 6) The Man Putin Wants To Interrogate (Listening time = 5 - 7 minutes - depending on chosen listening speed) 7) The Career Advice You Probably Didn't Get (especially women) (Listening time = 14 - 18 minutes - depending on chosen listening speed) 8) Frankenstein - It’s alive!!!

How to Promote Creativity in your Classroom? About ETR Community EdTechReview (ETR) is a community of and for everyone involved in education technology to connect and collaborate both online and offline to discover, learn, utilize and share about the best ways technology can improve learning, teaching, and leading in the 21st century. EdTechReview spreads awareness on education technology and its role in 21st century education through best research and practices of using technology in education, and by facilitating events, training, professional development, and consultation in its adoption and implementation.

Featured Lessons Jump to a Section Close Reading Model Lessons Sign up to receive updates from us. Featured Lessons Download All Date Added: 09/16/13 Save to FavoritesRemove from Favorites Share Send us your feedback These sets of 2-6 lessons include: Complex TextsText-dependent QuestionsVocabularyWriting AssignmentsAssessment Questions* *Not all lesson sets include assessment questions Close Reading Model Lessons "The Wind" by James Reeves Grades K-2 fiction lesson (relevant for Grades K-2); written by classroom teacher Diana Leddy. View Details "The Moon": Research Project Grade K-2 fiction and nonfiction (relevant for Grades K-2); written by classroom teachers Pat Fitzsimmons, Diana Leddy, Lindy Johnson, Sue Biggam, and Suzan Locke. View Details "Because of Winn-Dixie" by Kate DiCamillo (with mini-assessment) Grade 3 fiction lesson. View Details "The Fisherman and His Wife" by Lucy Crane Grade 3 fiction (relevant for Grades 2-4); written by classroom teacher Diana Leddy. View Details View Details Grade 6 nonfiction lesson.

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