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Six Emotional Leadership Styles - Leadership Training From MindTools

Six Emotional Leadership Styles - Leadership Training From MindTools
Choosing the Right Style for the Situation Find out how emotional leadership styles can affect your team's happiness. © iStockphoto/Kuklev Imagine that you work with a positive, charismatic leader. She's excited about the future of the organization, and she shares this excitement with her team. She makes sure that people understand how their efforts contribute to this future, and this inclusion sparks loyalty and intense effort in the team. Generally, morale and job satisfaction are high, because team members feel that they're making a difference. However, some people in her team don't respond well to this style of leadership. She could be more effective by varying her approach to leadership, depending on the situation; and she could do this by using "six emotional leadership styles," each of which is useful in different circumstances. In this article, we'll look at these six emotional leadership styles. The Six Emotional Leadership Styles Note: We'll now examine each style in more detail. 1. 2.

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Related:  Leadership StylesSelf ActualisationHow to Be an Emotionally & Socially Intelligent Leaderles styles ou fomes de Leadership

Leadership Continuum What is the Leadership Continuum? Description According to the Leadership Continuum model of R. Tannenbaum and W.H. Schmidt (1973) an autocratic leader will likely make his own decisions. How To Motivate Yourself: 3 Steps Backed By Science You make goals… but then you procrastinate. You write a to-do list… but then you don’t follow through. And this happens again and again and again. Seriously, what’s the problem? The New Leadership is Horizontal, Not Vertical Several decades ago, when “leadership” became a Big Thing, it was heavily personality-based. It posited Leadership as something done by Leaders, who had learned the art of how to Lead. As a consultant friend of mine, Renee Wingo, put it, “It’s a subject whose proponents can’t figure out whether it’s a noun, a verb, or a gerund.” Leaders were thought of as those who were followed by others. This dichotomy fed the idea that there are two kinds of people in this world – those who lead, and those who follow. Besides reinforcing the personality-based view of leadership, it raises the classic make or buy question – are Leaders just born, or can their secrets be unlocked and learned by others?

6 Leadership Styles, And When You Should Use Them You don’t need an MP3 player, a turntable, or a CD player to listen to Tristan Perich’s new album, Noise Patterns. All you need is a pair of headphones—"not earbuds," says the composer—and a willingness to hear music in noise. The 34-year-old Perich’s compositions push the border between white noise and electronic music, frequently straddling the two as if the static on your old television started emitting a strangely beautiful pattern of sound. But Perich doesn’t just compose music: His music is the instrument itself. He composes sound in code, carefully stringing together each 1 and 0 to transform numbers into a symphony.

News - Is it good for people to fail occasionally? 2 March 2014Last updated at 19:47 ET By Lucy Wallis BBC News In our highly competitive world, we prize success and hate it when things go wrong, but is there actually a value in failing? When Irish author Flann O'Brien submitted the manuscript for his second book, The Third Policeman, to a London publisher in 1940 it was rejected. But rather than admit this lack of success to his friends, he pretended the manuscript had accidentally blown out of the boot of his car on a trip to Donegal and had been lost forever. "This was a ruinous thing to say because he couldn't then turn around and say, 'Oh I've found it again,' so the manuscript sat very openly on his sideboard until his death," says Booker Prize-winning author Anne Enright.

Leadership Styles - Leadership Skills From MindTools Choosing the Right Approach for the Situation Find out what makes a great leader, with James Manktelow & Amy Carlson. From Mahatma Gandhi and Winston Churchill, to Martin Luther King and Steve Jobs, there can be as many ways to lead people as there are leaders. Einstein's Puzzle # Copyright (C) 2004 Lauri Karttunen # # This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify # it under the terms of GNU General Public License as published by # the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or # (at your option) any later version. # This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, # but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of # MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the # GNU General Public License for more details. Einstein's Puzzle Variations of this riddle appear on the net from time to time. It is sometimes attributed to Albert Einstein and it is claimed that 98% of the people are incapable of solving it. Some commentators suggest that Einstein created such puzzles not to test out intelligence but to get rid of all the students who wanted him as an advisor.

Leadership and Management Styles “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” - Peter Ferdinand Drucker, Austrian-born American writer, management consultant and university professor (1909-2005) Abstract: Getting the right things done can obviously be achieved in various ways: a “command-and-control” directive approach based on the manager’s exclusive expertise, a participative team discussion leveraging on everyone’s knowledge and skills, a path shown in a convincing and energetic manner by a charismatic leader… While it is important to know the various management and leadership styles with their respective advantages and drawbacks, it is also crucial to recognize that the best leaders are often the ones who can navigate from one style to another, depending on the context. Download a one-page executive summary here (PDF format): Leadership and Management Styles Concept:

21 Rules That Men Have. Number 7 Is So True. 10) You can either ask us to do something or tell us how you want it done. Not both. If you already know best how to do it, just do it yourself. 11) Whenever possible, please say whatever you have to during commercials. 12) Christopher Columbus did not need directions and neither do we… Dreyfus model of skill acquisition In the fields of education and operations research, the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition is a model of how students acquire skills through formal instruction and practicing. Brothers Stuart and Hubert Dreyfus proposed the model in 1980 in an influential, 18-page report on their research at the University of California, Berkeley, Operations Research Center for the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.[1] The original model proposes that a student passes through five distinct stages: novice, competence, proficiency, expertise, and mastery. The original five-stage model[edit]

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