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The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model

The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model
The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model by Terry Heick As a follow-up to our 9 Characteristics of 21st Century Learning we developed in 2009, we have developed an updated framework, The Inside-Out Learning Model. The goal of the model is simple enough–not pure academic proficiency, but instead authentic self-knowledge, diverse local and global interdependence, adaptive critical thinking, and adaptive media literacy. By design this model emphasizes the role of play, diverse digital and physical media, and a designed interdependence between communities and schools. The attempted personalization of learning occurs through new actuators and new notions of local and global citizenship. Here, families, business leaders, humanities-based organizations, neighbors, mentors, higher-education institutions, all converging to witness, revere, respond to, and support the learning of its own community members. The 9 Domains Of the Inside-Out Learning Model 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Information Fluency Information Fluency According to Danny Callison, information fluency is the ability to apply the skills associated with information literacy, computer literacy and critical thinking to address and solve information problems across disciplines, across academic levels, and across information format structures. According to The Associated Colleges of the South ( using critical thinking skills and appropriate technologies, information fluency integrates the abilities to: collect the information necessary to consider a problem or issue employ critical thinking skills in the evaluation and analysis of the information and its sources formulate logical conclusions and present those conclusions in an appropriate and effective way Read the article Key Word: Information Fluency (Word document) by Daniel Callison (SLMAM, in press, 2004). View Information Fluency (Real Media - 3:26). (Go to the Real website to download a free player. Understanding by Design

How Google Impacts The Way Students Think How Google Impacts The Way Students Think by Terry Heick It’s always revealing to watch learners research. Why do people migrate? Where does inspiration come from? How do different cultures view humanity differently? Literally Google it. And you see knowledge as searchable, even though that’s not how it works. 1. Google is powerful, the result of a complicated algorithm that attempts to index human thought that has been digitally manifest. The result? 2. When students are looking for an “answer,” good fortune sees them arrive at whatever they think they’re looking for, where they can (hopefully) evaluate the quality and relevance of the information, cite their source, and be on their merry way. But with the cold logistics of software, having come what they were looking for, learners are left with the back-button, a link on the page they’re on, or a fresh browser tab. Having found an “answer,” rabid-Googlers are ready to “finish” the assignment. 3. Especially those that seem conflicting.

Information Fluency | iTeachU Information Fluency is a three-part lens for assessing student understanding. The information fluency triad includes domain knowledge, critical thinking, and presentation and participation — three components of learning that work together to develop and confirm students’ understanding of the subject of your course. Domain knowledge is the specialized information about your field of expertise that you as a scholar have gathered over time through research, collaboration, and experience. Students who do not exhibit an ability to work the subject of your course into and between each of the three spheres of the information fluency triad may be portraying their incomplete understanding of your subject.

Digital Literacy vs. Digital Fluency Update 6/13/2012: We finally finished our book on this topic. It is available in print here, and in Kindle format here. You can also download a sample chapter here: here (601k PDF) Literacy and fluency* have to do with our ability to use a technology to achieve a desired outcome in a situation using the technologies that are available to us. ..and it applies to our ability to use digital technologies to have the intended positive effect on people and situations: Note that a literate person is perfectly capable of using the tools. *For the sake of simplicity, we have boiled all of this down to three levels of skill, and have given them what we think are easy-to-understand names. Related Posts:

Four stages of competence - Wikipedia In psychology, the four stages of competence, or the "conscious competence" learning model, relates to the psychological states involved in the process of progressing from incompetence to competence in a skill. History[edit] The Four Stages of Learning provides a model for learning. It suggests that individuals are initially unaware of how little they know, or unconscious of their incompetence. As they recognize their incompetence, they consciously acquire a skill, then consciously use it. Several elements, including helping someone 'know what they don't know' or recognize a blind spot, can be compared to some elements of a Johari window, although Johari deals with self-awareness, while the four stages of competence deals with learning stages. The four stages of competence[edit] Unconscious incompetenceThe individual does not understand or know how to do something and does not necessarily recognize the deficit. See also[edit] References[edit]

What Is Digital Literacy? Ava reads at Indian Run Elementary School in Dublin, Ohio. The school integrates iPads, laptops, and books into reading time. —Maddie McGarvey for Education Week Digital Literacy: An Evolving Definition While the word "literacy" alone generally refers to reading and writing skills, when you tack on the word "digital" before it, the term encompasses much, much more. Sure, reading and writing are still very much at the heart of digital literacy. The term is so broad that some experts even stay away from it, preferring to speak more specifically about particular skills at the intersection of technology and literacy. The American Library Association's digital-literacy task force offers this definition: "Digital literacy is the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, evaluate, create, and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills." Finding and Consuming In some formats, "consuming" digital content looks pretty much the same as reading print.

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