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Copyleft symbol Copyleft (a play on the word copyright) is the practice of using copyright law to offer the right to distribute copies and modified versions of a work and requiring that the same rights be preserved in modified versions of the work. In other words, copyleft is a general method for marking a creative work as freely available to be modified, and requiring all modified and extended versions of the creative work to be free as well.[1] Copyleft is a form of and can be used to maintain copyright conditions for works such as computer software, documents, and art. In general, copyright law is used by an author to prohibit recipients from reproducing, adapting, or distributing copies of the work. In contrast, under copyleft, an author may give every person who receives a copy of a work permission to reproduce, adapt or distribute it and require that any resulting copies or adaptations are also bound by the same licensing agreement. Reciprocity[edit] History[edit] Some[who?]

Related:  OPEN SOURCEEcole numérique hauss

Open Source Cinema Open Source Cinema was a collaborative website created to produce the documentary film RiP!: A Remix Manifesto, a co-production with Montreal's EyeSteelFilm and the National Film Board of Canada (NFB). It was launched in 2004 as a public beta, and in 2007 launched at the South By Southwest Interactive festival on the Drupal platform. eSafety Kit We believe that the best way to protect younger users is to educate and empower them by providing the tools they need to safeguard themselves, as part of our commitment to 'Promoting a Digital Society'. The safety of young people as they access the digital world is becoming an increasingly important issue, as internet and digital TV use continues to increase worldwide. Insafe and Liberty Global have developed a Family eSafety Kit for children aged 6–12 years, which explores online safety issues such as security, communication, cyberbullying and entertainment, while offering parents, teachers and young people advice on how to overcome these issues. The interactive family toolkit includes a comprehensive parents’ guide, an activity-based guidebook, situation cards, a family certificate and stickers.

Copyright "Copyrighting" and "Copyrights" redirect here. For the use of words to promote or advertise, see Copywriting. For the Wikipedia policy about copyright issues, see Wikipedia:Copyrights. Copyright is a legal right created by the law of a country that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights for its use and distribution. This is usually only for a limited time. The exclusive rights are not absolute but limited by limitations and exceptions to copyright law, including fair use. Food Trucks, Moving Companies Get in on Food Waste Reduction Whether its canned goods or pantry items, most people leave food behind when they move. As one whose family ran a moving company, Adam Lowry saw pounds of food go to waste. Until one day, he had an idea. “We figured we’d just ask people,” recalls the founder and executive director of Move for Hunger, a hunger relief organization that works with relocation. “In the first month we collected 300 pounds of food.” Today, Move for Hunger partners with 600 moving companies in 40 states.

Open content Open content or OpenContent is a neologism coined by David Wiley in 1998[1] which describes a creative work that others can copy or modify. The term evokes open source software, which is a related concept in software.[2] The logo on the screen in the subject's left hand is a Creative Commons license, while the paper in his right hand explains that the image is open content. When the term OpenContent was first used by Wiley, it described works licensed under the Open Content License (a non-free share-alike license, see 'Free content' below) and perhaps other works licensed under similar terms.[2] It has since come to describe a broader class of content without conventional copyright restrictions. Although open content has been described as a counterbalance to copyright,[4] open content licenses rely on a copyright holder's power to license their work.

All rights reversed The copyleft symbol. Unlike the copyright symbol, it has no legal meaning. In 1984/5 programmer Don Hopkins sent Richard Stallman a letter labeled "Copyleft—all rights reversed". Stallman chose the phrase to identify his free software method of distribution.[3] It is often accompanied by a reversed version of the copyright symbol (see illustration).[4] "All Rights Reversed", its homonym, "All Rites Reversed", and/or the "Copyleft" symbol, are occasionally used among those who publish or produce media (or any other material that might normally be copyrighted) as a clever means of saying "This is not copyrighted. Please, do with it what you will." and encouraging the duplication and use of the "copy-lefted" material thereof.

Patentleft Patentleft (also patent left, copyleft-style patent license) is the practice of licensing patents (especially biological patents) for royalty-free use, on the condition that adopters license related improvements they develop under the same terms. Copyleft-style licensors seek "continuous growth of a universally accessible technology commons" from which they, and others, will benefit.[1] Patentleft is analogous to copyleft, a license which allows distribution of a copyrighted work and derived works, but only under the same terms. Uses of patentleft[edit] The Biological Innovation for Open Society (BIOS) project implemented a patentleft system to encourage re-contribution and collaborative innovation of their technology. Example[edit]

Creative Commons Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share.[1] The organization has released several copyright-licenses known as Creative Commons licenses free of charge to the public. These licenses allow creators to communicate which rights they reserve, and which rights they waive for the benefit of recipients or other creators. An easy-to-understand one-page explanation of rights, with associated visual symbols, explains the specifics of each Creative Commons license. Creative Commons licenses do not replace copyright, but are based upon it. They replace individual negotiations for specific rights between copyright owner (licensor) and licensee, which are necessary under an "all rights reserved" copyright management, with a "some rights reserved" management employing standardized licenses for re-use cases where no commercial compensation is sought by the copyright owner.

Patent troll A patent troll, also called a patent assertion entity (PAE), is a person or company who enforces patent rights against accused infringers in an attempt to collect licensing fees, but does not manufacture products or supply services based upon the patents in question, thus engaging in economic rent-seeking. Related, less pejorative terms include patent holding company (PHC) and non-practicing entity (NPE). Generally not considered patent trolls are NPEs such as university research laboratories, development firms that offer their patented technologies to licensees in advance, and licensing agents that offer enforcement and negotiation services on behalf of patent owners.[1] 6 Open Educational Resources There's a subtle but steady shift happening in classrooms across the nation. More and more, schools are seeking efficient, cost-effective alternatives to using paper and supporting over-priced textbook companies. One way is by supporting technology in schools. Schools are seeking ways to upgrade and sustain wireless infrastructures and integrate mobile devices that broaden teaching and learning opportunities. Similarly, schools are decreasing their dependency on paper and incorporating digital workflows. Setting the Stage for Creative Exploration and Inquiry

Free Art License History[edit] The license was written in July 2000 with contributions from the mailing list <copyleft_attitude> and in particular with Mélanie Clément-Fontaine and David Geraud, lawyers, and Isabelle Vodjdani and Antoine Moreau, artists. It followed meetings held by Copyleft Attitude Antoine Moreau with the artists gathered around the magazine Allotopie: Francis Deck, Antonio Gallego, Roberto Martinez and Emma Gall. They took place at "Accès Local" in January 2000 and "Public" in March 2000, two places of contemporary art in Paris.[2] Patent privateer A patent privateer or intellectual property privateer is a party, typically a patent assertion entity, authorized by another party, often a technology corporation, to use intellectual property to attack other operating companies.[1] Privateering provides a way for companies to assert intellectual property against their competitors with a significantly reduced risk of retaliation and as a means for altering their competitive landscape. The strategy began with a handful of large operating companies.[2] In April 2013, a group of technology companies asked the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission to investigate the privateering strategy as an impediment to competition.[3] Intellectual property privateering has been formally defined as: Background[edit] Companies may purchase external, third-party IPRs to fulfill a variety of needs.

The 10 Most Popular Teacher Tools Being Used This Year This image shows absolutely no teacher tools. Aside from that pencil maybe. But seriously, that says a lot about how far we’ve come! GNU General Public License The GNU General Public License (GNU GPL or GPL) is the most widely used[5] free software license, which guarantees end users (individuals, organizations, companies) the freedoms to use, study, share (copy), and modify the software. Software that allows these rights is called free software and if the software is copyleft ensures those are retained. The GPL demands both.