background preloader

The Teacher's Guide To Digital Citizenship

How you act online is important. Not just because everything is stored, backed up, and freely available to anyone with a keyboard. But because your online reputation is actually just your reputation. There’s really no difference between online and offline anymore. In an effort to keep everyone behaving, Microsoft has just unveiled a new (free) curriculum that’s all about digital citizenship , intellectual property rights , and creative content . It offers cross-curricular classroom activities that align with the AASL and ISTE national academic standards. How It Works Four units comprise the curriculum resources. Each unit has 4-6 of these project-oriented activities, one of which serves as the culminating lesson for the unit. The following is simply a description of each unit followed by the learning objectives for that particular unit. Unit One: Creative What? This unit explores the general topics of intellectual property, creative content , and creative rights. Unit Two: By Rule Of Law

http://edudemic.com/2012/10/teachers-guide-digital-citizenship/

Related:  MethodsEdTechdigital citizenshp

Should We Connect School Life to Real Life? Culture Teaching Strategies Excerpted from Will Richardson’s new TED Book Why School: How Education Must Change When Learning and Information Are Everywhere. Richardson offers provocative alternatives to the existing education system, questioning everything from standardized assessments to the role of the teacher. What Adobe’s Move to the Creative Cloud Means for Schools Software maker Adobe surprised the tech world last week when it announced that it would stop selling box sets of its popular Creative Suite design software , including Acrobat and Photoshop, in favor of a subscription-based service available through its Creative Cloud . The announcement was big news for magazine publishers and graphic artist types. But it also stands to have significant implications for K–12 schools. Thousands of K–12 teachers and students use Adobe’s Creative Suite products — the vast majority of whom own licenses for traditional off-the-shelf software boxes.

A Letter To Parents Of Digital Age Children A Letter To Parents Of Digital Age Children by Susan Lucille Davis first appeared on gettingsmart.com First, let me thank you for entrusting me with teaching your children, honoring the amazing individuals they are, and helping them discover the confident and empowered young people they can be. Providing a rich and engaging environment for your children to learn in is my utmost concern, but Iately I have had to acknowledge that the young people I see every day do much of the learning that is important to them when they leave the parking lot and head home from school.

The 6 Hottest Teaching Trends (And How Teachers Are Adopting Them) The Current State Of Technology In K-12 6.95K Views 0 Likes What is the next device most students will soon purchase? How many schools have a digital strategy? Find out in the current state of technology in K-12. The Persistent Appeal of Technology in Learning Image credit: iStockphoto Dr. Victor Frankenstein loved technology, and Mary Shelley's work of fiction was at once a cautionary and promotional tale of technology's incredible potential. In the iconic story, he took the pieces of a human being and stitched them together to create something monstrous -- but in many ways more human than the model he was hoping to produce.

The 5 Things All Digital Citizens Should Do Being a digital citizen is a fact of life these days. Everyone must be a well-behaved digital citizen looking to help others. Think of it like the Girl / Boy Scouts but online. That’s basically what this visual from Common Sense Media did when they detailed the five things all digital citizens should do.

The 21st Century Learning and Teaching Skills You should not Miss Digital media and internet are transforming the way our kids socialize and play; they are even changing the way they learn and participate civically. Many believe that this shift could possibly transform teaching and learning broadening, thus, the focus of literacy to include the digital element. Technology is not only revolutionizing education but it is also reconceptualizing the way this education is delivered. Here is how this reconceptualization process is taking place : Learning environments in the 20th century : Learning in the 20th century was basically taking place in a poor environment whose major players were : school, teachers, and parents. Cyber Safety : InformED Its always good to be cautious while on the internet. There are people in the cyber world who want to do harm to you or your computer. These are some good tips to keep in mind while you are surfing:

The Beginner's Guide To Creating Digital Portfolios The Connected Student Series: Last week on the Connected Student Series, I discussed the ‘why’ of digital portfolios. It is imperative that in 2014, students be able to curate, archive and expand on the work they are producing in class. As an added bonus, student digital portfolios help students authentically learn important digital citizenship lessons. Portfolios also allow students to internalize vital digital literacy skills such as creating their own digital web presence and learning to effectively and purposefully share their learning with the world. This week, I will highlight how you can make this process happen and showcase the tools you might want to consider using.

Why Teachers Are (And Aren’t) Using Educational Video Games The Current State Of Technology In K-12 7.15K Views 0 Likes What is the next device most students will soon purchase? How many schools have a digital strategy? Find out in the current state of technology in K-12. For Windows 8.1, a half-step toward a Start button It's not quite the Start button, but Microsoft is adding a "Start tip," a Windows logo that pops up when users hover their cursor in the lower left corner of Windows 8.1. When users click on it, they jump to a customized Start screen. (Credit: Microsoft) When Microsoft rolls out Windows 8.1, the update to its struggling, 7-month-old operating system franchise, the company will not be bringing back the Start button as many users have been requesting. But the company has acquiesced some.

Related: