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How to Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools

How to Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools
Does your staff need Educational Technology training? The K-12 Teachers Alliance can help you plan your in-service professional development at no additional cost. Regardless of your school’s cell phone policy, the reality in most schools is that students have phones in their pockets, purses, or hoodies. Why not get these tools out in plain sight and use them for good and not evil? Here are some easy to use strategies to use cell phones in the classrooms. Today, we debunk five false assumptions about the teaching profession. Helpful read-aloud teaching strategies that you can use for children in and... We take a closer look at problem students, and how you can use classroom... The 2x10 classroom management method can help you alter the behavior of at-risk... These technology in the classroom websites can help teach financial literacy. Why Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools Some people may want to ban cell phones from classrooms, but I disagree. Cell Phone Learning Strategies Awesome Teacher Apps

http://www.teachhub.com/how-use-cell-phones-learning-tools

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Smart phones require smart communication strategies By Nora Carr, APR, Fellow PRSARead more by October 10th, 2012 When parents perceive a communication void, they will work to fill it, by creating their own mobile apps or alternative social media sites. With as many as 49 percent of all U.S. adults using smart phones, according to Nielsen reports, it’s time to get smart about school communications as well. Today’s on-the-go parents, teachers, and principals require fast, easy access to news and information. How to Make Homemade All-Purpose Cleaner and Spray Bottles That Won’t Leach Yesterday, My Son Ate Some Laundry Detergent Being the kind, thoughtful mother than I am, I handed him a glass of water to wash it down. That, folks, is the beauty of making your own non-toxic cleaning supplies. The best part? They WORK.

Is All This Student Data Changing the Way Teachers Teach? Christy Novack works with students in her Burlingame, Calif. classroom. Francesca Segre/MindShift With so much access to student data these days, teachers are experimenting with different tactics, and figuring out what’s working and what’s not. Mobile Learning Support for New Teachers The mobile learning revolution is alive and growing in popularity every day. When schools move toward mobile learning in the classroom, they can take advantage of electronic devices such as tablets and cell phones that offer portability and ease of use. Mobile learning technologies can offer teachers a flexible approach to learning with their students in a variety of locations, and encourage this learning to continue at home. As schools begin to consider the movement towards mobile learning, it's important to support teachers with strategies for success, particularly if they are new. As I began to research this topic I was disappointed to discover that resources for supporting new teacher use of mobile learning strategies weren't easily accessible. So I reached out to my friend Lisa Nielsen and her co-author Willyn Webb to share with us how a new teacher might begin to use mobile learning in the classroom.

Smartphones: From Toy to Tool In classrooms, smartphones are slowly shifting out of the toy-and-liability-to-attention category, and into the tool-and-engaging-students category. It's part of the movement to "meet students where they are" that's being embraced by teachers who believe in a non-standardized approach to education. Jeremy Mettler, social studies teacher at Batavia (New York) High School, puts it this way: "Students all have them and they love using them, but they don't realize they're walking around with a computer in their pocket." Yet computers, helpful as they are, can be a distraction. Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool? The final version of the National Education Technology Plan (NETP) was released last week, setting forth the Obama Administration's plan for improving access to and integration of technologies for teaching and learning. Among the recommendations the Department of Education makes in the NETP is a call for support for "efforts to ensure that all students and educators have 24/7 access to the Internet via devices, including mobile devices, and that states, districts, and schools adopt technologies and policies to enable leveraging the technology that students already have." The push for "24/7 access to the Internet" falls under another the auspices of yet another endeavor, the National Broadband Plan.

15 Surprising Uses For Eggshells A couple of weeks ago I bought a composter for my garden. It’s a pretty fancy contraption. It’s actually TWO composters in one. The idea being that you can have one batch “brewing” while another batch is being utilized. To Ban or Not to Ban: Schools Weigh Cell Phone Policies Flickr:From_Ko Last week, a study by the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that cellphones have become “near ubiquitous”: 83% of American adults own one. Over half of all adult mobile phone owners had used their phones at least once to get information they needed right away. Accessing Multimedia Using QR Codes Students of all ages are required to read text for a variety of purposes. With a large emphasis placed on teaching skills that help children tackle nonfiction, it's important to think about the different ways that students are gathering facts and details as they take in information. Teachers need to think beyond traditional text and make sure that their students have the necessary skills for processing, evaluating, and comprehending multimedia. Not a Trend, But a Tool

Should We Allow Cell Phones in School? Benefits of Smartphones Are cellphones in the classroom a good idea? Does this device serve as a valid learning tool or just as another distraction contributing to the social disengagement of children? Smartphone ownership Cellphones have come a long way since the two-pound, $3,995 Motorola DynaTAC 8000X was first introduced in 1984. The "BYOD" Debate - Educational Technology for School Leaders 1. Cost Effective way to increase technology in schools. (ALM)"It goes without saying the a BYOD policy allows a district to get closer to a 1 to 1 device ratio without incurring the costs of a 1 to 1 program." - Oak Hills Portfolio, Cincinnati. Oak Hills Portfolio When students are able to bring their own device to school, the school is saving money on the cost of purchasing device. Districts are facing more budget cuts and money restraints than ever before, so by allowing students to bring their own device, districts can save money.

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