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20 Awesome BYOD and Mobile Learning Apps

20 Awesome BYOD and Mobile Learning Apps
We have now been Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) for three years, and boy, do the students bring it. They bring it all! We have iPads, Surface, iPhones, Droids, Chromebooks, Macs, and PC laptops. Here's my current thinking. Please share yours in the comments section below. Note Taking If students can't find, review, and access their notes or pictures of the board, their mobile note-taking system is useless. Microsoft OneNote In my opinion, the most robust single note-taking app is Microsoft OneNote because it looks just like a traditional notebook. Evernote Evernote is a multiplatform app, but you cannot edit simultaneously. The premium version searches handwritten text so that photos of the board or your notes can actually be found later. eBooks With ebooks as the current battleground of education technology, students should know how to find and download ebooks and PDFs on Kindle, iBooks, and Kobo. Writing Traditional Essay Writing Collaborative Writing Moving Between Platforms Blogging Cloud Sync

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/20-awesome-byod-mobile-apps-vicki-davis

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Digital Storytelling June 24, 2014 Here is a great interactive Thinglink image on the process of digital storytelling I want to share with you today. This graphic is created by Tonia and features a wide variety of iPad apps that go with each of the stages of the digital storytelling process. Tonia used the concept of process writing (popularized by Donal Murray) to design this digital storytelling process visual. This process is made up of 7 stages namely :prewriting, drafting, editing, conferencing, revising, publishing, and sharing. If you hover your mouse over any of these stages you will be able to see a clickable button that you can use to access the list of iPad apps for that stage. I have spent sometime going through the different app suggestions included in this visual and I find them really interesting.

Accessing Multimedia Using QR Codes Students of all ages are required to read text for a variety of purposes. With a large emphasis placed on teaching skills that help children tackle nonfiction, it's important to think about the different ways that students are gathering facts and details as they take in information. Teachers need to think beyond traditional text and make sure that their students have the necessary skills for processing, evaluating, and comprehending multimedia. Not a Trend, But a Tool

Defining, Discussing and Evaluating Mobile Learning: The moving finger writes and having writ . . . . John Traxler University of Wolverhampton, UK Abstract Since the start of the current millennium, experience and expertise in the development and delivery of mobile learning have blossomed and a community of practice has evolved that is distinct from the established communities of 'tethered' e-Learning. This community is currently visible mainly through dedicated international conference series, of which MLEARN is the most prestigious, rather than through any dedicated journals.

Top 10 Ways iPads Are Key to Teaching Kids With Learning Disabilities By now, saying that “the iPad is a great tool for customizing the classroom” wouldn’t exactly be breaking news. But while this holds true for every student, each of whom learns in their own way, iPads are truly a lifeline for students with learning disabilities and the people who work hand-in-hand with them. For these students, iPads act as a translation, communication, and individualization tool with unrivaled effectiveness. In so doing, these devices reduce frustration, build confidence, and, well, just work in teaching students the skills they need to learn to thrive. Let’s take a look at a few more ways iPads are altering the classroom landscape for students with learning disabilities. fPhoto Credit: Brad Flickinger

Mobile Learning Support for New Teachers The mobile learning revolution is alive and growing in popularity every day. When schools move toward mobile learning in the classroom, they can take advantage of electronic devices such as tablets and cell phones that offer portability and ease of use. Mobile learning technologies can offer teachers a flexible approach to learning with their students in a variety of locations, and encourage this learning to continue at home. As schools begin to consider the movement towards mobile learning, it's important to support teachers with strategies for success, particularly if they are new. As I began to research this topic I was disappointed to discover that resources for supporting new teacher use of mobile learning strategies weren't easily accessible. So I reached out to my friend Lisa Nielsen and her co-author Willyn Webb to share with us how a new teacher might begin to use mobile learning in the classroom.

Search by Image – Inside Search – Google Drag and drop Drag and drop an image from the web or your computer into the search box on images.google.com. Upload an image On images.google.com, click the camera icon, then select “Upload an image.” Select the image you want to use to start your search. City & Guilds launches mobile apps City & Guilds has recently launched a series of mobile phone apps as part of its commitment to enhancing learners’ experiences. 05 October 2012 / City & Guilds has recently launched a series of mobile phone apps as part of its commitment to enhancing learners’ experiences both in the UK and abroad. It is hoped the apps will give learners the freedom to develop their skills whenever and wherever they like. In total, three different apps have been developed - SmartCards, A-Z, and QuizCity. SmartCards, which are currently available for Business Administration, Customer Service and Retail learners, provide testing opportunities on key learning points through easy to use flashcards.

21 Good iPad Apps for Middle School Teachers to Try This Summer The summer is a great time to explore new-to-you iPad apps that you might want to add to the iPads that you have in your classroom. Each day this week I’m going to share a selection of apps appropriate for four ranges of pre-K-12 grades. On Monday I shared 21 apps for Pre-K through 2nd grade. Yesterday, I shared apps 3rd through 5th grade students. Today’s list features apps for grades six through eight. Apps for 9th through 12th grade will be shared tomorrow. Digital Library Trends for 2015 Libraries in all over the world are undergoing a digital renaissance as major publishers have firmly committed themselves to the concept of making e-Books available. Today, we look at some of the biggest trends facing libraries in Canada, US and United Kingdom. A recent report by the Library Journal has stated that 95% of all US libraries have an e-book collection. That’s up from 89% in both 2013 and 2012, when researchers thought that adoption had plateaued for good. The average number of e-books carried was 20,244 by each library, but that of course was skewed toward large libraries. Medium sized libraries statistically had around 10,434 titles.

5 App and Mobile Use Guides for Parents Today, kids of all ages are using mobile devices for learning, to communicate with friends, to surf the web, and to play. In fact, a 2013 Common Sense research study found that 75 percent of children 8 years old or younger had access to a "smart" mobile device at home. For teens, mobile use is near ubiquitous; almost 80 percent own a cell phone and three-quarters use mobile devices to access the internet, according to findings from a 2013 Pew Research survey. Apps and mobile devices can be great tools for helping families play, learn, and connect together; though, as a parent, it can be a challenge to know where to start. You likely have questions and concerns about how your children are using these devices.

The Ultimate Directory Of Free Image Sources So, you need an image for your blog? We’ve spent some time categorizing our favorite sources for free images and organizing them in such a way as to help you find what you’re looking for. Here are the criteria we’ve examined: Subjects: Does a site focus on specific genres of images, or is it a mass collection of various image types? High Resolution: Lots of great image resources emerged in the pre-Web 2.0 phase, but it wasn’t until bandwidth dramatically increased that allowed for the uploading of much higher resolution images suitable for editing and printing. License: The licenses vary extremely from source to source. How to use Near Field Communication to engage your foreign students Many of you have probably heard of QR codes and may not have the most positive opinion of them. QR codes are a type of two-dimensional barcode that can be read using smartphones that link directly to text, emails, websites or phone numbers. The downside is that you need to download special software before you can use them, fiddle around on your phone to get to the right app and the results are all too frequently underwhelming. QR codes may have their function, but the reality is that they’re often tricky and frustrating to use. So that’s where Near Field Communication (NFC) codes come in. NFC is a wireless technology which enables communication between devices, and allows a user to wave their smartphone or tablet over an NFC tag to collect information in a convenient way.

10 startups that are shaping the future of education Due to ongoing efforts to reform the learning experience, the education space is seen by the startup world as having a lot of untapped potential. Companies in the field offer everything from MOOCs and blended learning experiences to social networks for students seeking jobs and educators seeking feedback on their teaching. And with no shortage of companies looking to invest, the number of innovative startups popping up isn't likely to subside anytime soon. With massive disruption potentially imminent, here are 10 education startups to watch in this exciting time: The startup formerly known as Top Hat Monocle is already having an eventful 2013.

Meet the Tabletarians In March 2011, the Boise Public Library (BPL), ID, used $3,300 in Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant funding to purchase four iPad 2 tablets and all of the trimmings, such as wireless keyboard docks, barcode scanners, and cases with hand grips. According to “Roving Reference, iPad-Style,” published in the Idaho Librarian in November 2011, “the goal of the grant was to increase staff interaction with customers by giving librarians tools to move out from behind the desk.” As with BPL, many libraries had been looking for ways to showcase librarian and staff expertise and enhance customer service. Having staff stroll the stacks and proactively offer assistance is one way to ensure that even the most reference desk–averse patrons are finding what they need, and Apple’s new tablets—the original iPad had been introduced less than a year earlier—seemed like the perfect accessory for roving reference.

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