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Mobile Learning Technologies for 21st Century Classrooms

Mobile Learning Technologies for 21st Century Classrooms
By Jonathan Wylie The mobile revolution is here. More and more schools are moving toward mobile learning in the classroom as a way to take advantage of a new wave of electronic devices that offer portability and ease of use on a budget. Mobile learning technologies offer teachers-and students-a more flexible approach to learning. In 2001, Marc Prensky warned us, "Our students have changed radically. The education system we work in is not always known for its speed at latching on to new ideas and methodologies, but with mobile learning it is catching up-quickly. The research that has been done on the use of mobile apps like these has been very promising. Studies like these help underline the academic potential that mobile learning devices can have to enrich the learning process for students. One example of mobile technology for children with special needs is Proloquo2go, an assistive technology app available on iTunes. So what about e-readers? Still not convinced? Related:  Mobile Learning

Do Mobile Devices in the Classroom Really Improve Learning Outcomes? Matthew Lynch, Virginia Union University Mobile devices as teaching tools are becoming a more and more common part of the American education experience in classrooms, from preschool through graduate school. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 58% of U.S. teachers own smartphones — 10 percentage points higher than the national average for adults. Those teachers are building that tech-savviness into their lesson plans, too, by embracing bring-your-own-device policies and leading the push for an iPad for every student. What do these mobile devices really add, though? Research finds benefits of mobile technology That same Pew Research Center survey asked a group of Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers about the educational impact of Internet technology in the classroom. As far back as 2010, reports were surfacing that mobile apps are not only engaging, but educational, for children as young as preschool. Mobile devices also bring challenges • E-readers.

Exploring Students' Mobile Learning Practices in Higher Education Key Takeaways A university-wide survey on students' mobile learning practices showed that ownership of mobile devices is high among students and that tablets are the most popular devices for academic purposes. The survey also found that mobile learning typically occurs outside the classroom, with only limited guidance from instructors. To improve mobile learning effectiveness, students and instructors need help adopting more effective learning and teaching practices across content areas. Baiyun Chen and Aimee deNoyelles are instructional designers at the University of Central Florida. Mobile technologies are playing an increasingly important role in college students' academic lives. The popularity of mobile technologies among college students is increasing dramatically. To successfully adopt mobile technologies across the university, however, we need more information about the student population's mobile access and use. Key Issues Methods We collected data (N = 1,082) in summer 2012. Notes

12 Principles Of Mobile Learning 12 Principles Of Mobile Learning by Terry Heick Ed note: This post has been updated and republished from a previous Mobile Learning is about self-actuated personalization. As learning practices and technology tools change, mobile learning itself will continue to evolve. It is only within these communities that the native context of each learner can be fully understood. 1. A mobile learning environment is about access to content, peers, experts, portfolio artifacts, credible sources, and previous thinking on relevant topics. 2. As mobile learning is a blend of the digital and physical, diverse metrics (i.e., measures) of understanding and “performance of knowledge” will be available. 3. The cloud is the enabler of “smart” mobility. 4. Transparency is the natural byproduct of connectivity, mobility, and collaboration. 5. Play is one of the primary characteristics of authentic, progressive learning, both a cause and effect of an engaged mind. 6. 7. 8. With mobility comes diversity. 9. 10. 11.

Do mobile devices in the classroom really improve learning outcomes? Mobile devices as teaching tools are becoming a more and more common part of the American education experience in classrooms, from preschool through graduate school. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 58% of U.S. teachers own smartphones — 10 percentage points higher than the national average for adults. Those teachers are building that tech-savviness into their lesson plans, too, by embracing bring-your-own-device policies and leading the push for an iPad for every student. In 2013, an estimated 25% of U.S. schools had BYOD policies in place and it’s reasonable to assume those numbers have risen in the past two years. What do these mobile devices really add, though? Is there more to this tech trend than just grabbing the attention of students? Research finds benefits of mobile technology That same Pew Research Center survey asked a group of Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers about the educational impact of Internet technology in the classroom.

The 7 Awesome Benefits of Mobile Learning for Learners Mobile learning is rapidly becoming the norm of eLearning! mLearning has invaded the eLearning scene, regardless of the age of the learner. A successful eLearning project caters to mLearning by default. In this article, we discover the top 7 advantages of mobile learning and why mLearning is the preferred method of learning. Performance support or collaborative eLearning environment, mLearning has all the cards. What’s with the enormous success of mobile learning anyway? Here are a few takes on that question: 1. In a given organization, there are traditional learners, baby-boomers, Gen X and Gen Y. 2. More and more learners now prefer multimedia to stay engaged in a learning environment, for example videos, podcasts, audio as well as access to bite-sized learning, or microlearning on the go. 3. Initiatives like BYOD (bring your own device) have created a mobile device-based learning environment. 4. Older courses can be migrated easily to the mlearning platform with minimal effort. 1. 2.

Education Update:Make Parents Your Partners:Can Mobile Devices Transform Education? The popularity of smartphones, including Droids, iPhones, and BlackBerries, that now have GPS, texting, voice, and multimedia capabilities has prompted industry and education reformers to shine the light on these mobile devices as vehicles suitable for transforming K–12 learning for the 21st century. Although they present challenges as well as potential benefits, education experts reason that these powerful small computers motivate students; provide constant access to the wealth of knowledge, tools, and experts on the web; and are cheaper and more plentiful than laptops or desktop workstations. "A big choice for us is: we have this very flexible tool, much more like a Swiss army knife than a hammer. What do we want to use it for?" says Christopher Dede, Timothy E. Compared to laptops and computer workstations, mobile devices are cheaper, more portable, and physically less obtrusive, especially during collaborative work. The Innovators Augmenting Reality

Catering to Today’s Learners with Mobile Apps for K-12 K-12 education today needs to cater to the learning style of Gen Z, the generation of “digital natives.” In fact, research shows that 51% of high school students bring a smartphone to school every day. A great way to reach today’s students is through the channels that they prefer using, such as mobile apps. Mobile learning has the potential to ease access to educational resources, and make them accessible anywhere and at any time. Many students today are intrinsically motivated, have a sense of accountability and will seek such resources to make the most of what they have access to learn from. Also, students, today are mindful of the fact that digital learning and eBooks are much more eco-friendly. The Case for Mobile Apps in K-12 Education The future of e-learning is undeniably correlated with mobile learning. These stats are only the tip of the iceberg. All this only goes to show that the use of mobile apps can help K-12 education. The Future of K-12 Learning 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Designing for sustainable mobile learning – re-evaluating the concepts “formal” and “informal”: Interactive Learning Environments: Vol 0, No 0 Introduction Mobile learning (mLearning), which became a recognised term in 2005 (Crompton, 2013Crompton, H. (2013). A historical overview of m-learning: Toward learner-centred education. In Z. In terms of learning design, the integration of personal mobile devices into education that is introduced by mLearning is a challenging task. The mLearning research field has not yet presented results to support the integration of mobile devices in education in the long term. This study aims to address challenges for mLearning design given the representations of formal and informal learning concepts in mLearning research. The distinction between formal and informal learning is at the very core of mLearning, where the possibilities to access non-educational, usually referred to as informal and/or non-formal, contexts through the use of mobile devices are often highlighted by researchers (see e.g. Even though some researchers (e.g. Discussion and conclusion

A critical review of mobile learning integration in formal educational contexts Digital devices as a distraction in the classroom Shirky (2014), in a lengthy essay on Medium, argued that, although he is an advocate of the use of technology in the classroom, he asked his students to put their laptops, tablets and phones away in classes. The author claims that this decision was made considering that the levels of distraction is his classes were growing despite the existence of two constants: the teacher and the students, which were selected using approximately the same criteria each year. However, this line of thought is not new. One of those effects is reported by Shirky (2014) and by Sana, Weston, and Cepeda (2013) and it is related with the potential harmful effects on learning resulting from using mobile devices for nearby peers. According to these authors this effect is particularly serious and Shirky argues that “[t]here is no laissez-faire attitude to take when the degradation of focus is social.” Multitasking and its negative effects on learning

SAGE Journals: Your gateway to world-class journal research Mobile devices are ubiquitous technologies. In fact, more than 6 billion people worldwide have access to a mobile device (Westlund, 2013). For some, the use of such devices is embedded in a broader digital inclusion agenda to enable all citizens to fully participate in their communities, benefit from online services, and make learning opportunities and workforce preparation more accessible globally (Cavanaugh, Maor, & McCarthy, 2014). In a study, Lenhart (2015) found that more than 75% of American adolescents (middle school and higher) have access to a smartphone. Sharples, Taylor, and Vavoula (2005) describe technology as any tool that serves the purpose of inquiry and enables individuals to address problems in context and to clarify and make meanings of them. Alongside the growth of mobile technologies, educators must consider federal laws and policies for special populations. Research on M-Learning Methods Search Procedure Inclusion Criteria Exclusion Criteria Article Selection Coding

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