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Five-Minute Film Festival: Mobile Learning

Five-Minute Film Festival: Mobile Learning
As technology evolves, it's important to make time for fresh beginnings and innovative ideas. For some, this could include a new perspective on the devices that are becoming so ubiquitous in our lives -- mobile gadgets like smartphones, tablets, mp3 players, and eReaders. Schools around the country are struggling with how to deal with these gadgets: is it better to embrace them and incorporate them into the learning process? Ban them and try to keep them out of schools? Or something in between? In the playlist below, I've gathered some videos about educators and schools who are welcoming the sea change that is mobile learning. Video Playlist: Mobile Devices in the Classroom Keep watching the player below to see the rest of the playlist, or view it on YouTube. More Resources for Mobile Learning

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/film-festival-mobile-learning

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Mobile Learning: Resource Roundup Facebook Edutopia on Facebook Twitter Edutopia on Twitter Google+ Pinterest Edutopia on Pinterest Accessing Multimedia Using QR Codes Students of all ages are required to read text for a variety of purposes. With a large emphasis placed on teaching skills that help children tackle nonfiction, it's important to think about the different ways that students are gathering facts and details as they take in information. Teachers need to think beyond traditional text and make sure that their students have the necessary skills for processing, evaluating, and comprehending multimedia. Not a Trend, But a Tool

The First 5s with iPads Author's Note: This post expands on ideas that I originally shared last year on Edutopia. With the start of school approaching and the looming expectation of incorporating iPads into the curriculum becoming a reality, the big question many educators are asking is: "Where should I begin?" Last year, I wrote about 5 Steps for the First 5 Days. However, what about the five days after that? It can seem daunting to envision a year's worth of activities with iPads, but when taken in small chunks, it doesn't need to be intimidating. The Future of Learning Remember the Jetsons? That iconic family of the future depicted in the 1960s cartoon? They lived in a futuristic society marked by flying cars and advanced technology -- and yet, they learned in a lecture-based system with the teacher (albeit a robot one) directing the process from the front of the room. We have always struggled to envision the future, often superimposing new technology over our current views. Though the creators of the Jetsons did not have the constraints of standardized tests, limited budgets, or even gravity, their schools closely resembled those of the 1960s -- which, in many ways, still look like those of today. The challenge of imagining the future of learning can seem daunting.

A Mobile Dilemma About three years ago, while I was teaching education at a local college, I was attempting to do an observation of one of my students at her student teaching assignment. It was my first time visiting that high school, so I found myself running late in traffic. I attempted to call my student on her cellphone to let her know that I might be a little late, but she never answered. I texted her, but she never responded.

Can We Use Personal Learning Networks to Create Real Reform? (#edchat summary) As is often the case with any large group online, #edchats can be impossibly frustrating for anyone who isn't ADD. With tweets flying everywhere and asynchronous discussions peppered with @,#, and !, it looks more like a cartoon expletive than any sort of useful dialog. It is to help translate all of this that we've been offering these short summary blogs. But, as I found out this week when our guest bloggers fell through, it becomes a bit like the blind men and the elephant. The summary below is what I got out of it. Mobile Learning Support for New Teachers The mobile learning revolution is alive and growing in popularity every day. When schools move toward mobile learning in the classroom, they can take advantage of electronic devices such as tablets and cell phones that offer portability and ease of use. Mobile learning technologies can offer teachers a flexible approach to learning with their students in a variety of locations, and encourage this learning to continue at home. As schools begin to consider the movement towards mobile learning, it's important to support teachers with strategies for success, particularly if they are new. As I began to research this topic I was disappointed to discover that resources for supporting new teacher use of mobile learning strategies weren't easily accessible. So I reached out to my friend Lisa Nielsen and her co-author Willyn Webb to share with us how a new teacher might begin to use mobile learning in the classroom.

Using QR Codes in the Classroom Whoever said that iPads or tablets would be the game-changers this school year obviously overlooked a trend that has been crossing my social media streams, art museum exhibits, food and products. It seems that no matter where I look I see QR codes being used. I even bought a banana a few weeks ago that had a QR code on the sticker that pointed to the farm where it was grown! Smartphones: From Toy to Tool In classrooms, smartphones are slowly shifting out of the toy-and-liability-to-attention category, and into the tool-and-engaging-students category. It's part of the movement to "meet students where they are" that's being embraced by teachers who believe in a non-standardized approach to education. Jeremy Mettler, social studies teacher at Batavia (New York) High School, puts it this way: "Students all have them and they love using them, but they don't realize they're walking around with a computer in their pocket." Yet computers, helpful as they are, can be a distraction.

Leading and Learning for a Successful Digital Transformation Education, like so many other aspects of our society, has been undergoing a digital transformation. Accepting this reality is inevitable. Embracing it would be wise. But my district has chosen to go a step beyond that as we strive to lead the transformation. Digital transformation in Vancouver Public Schools (VPS) began with our second-generation strategic planning process, which we call Design II.

Additional resource links for mobile learning. by dkherning Feb 3

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