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Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work?

Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work?
Getty Just a few years ago, the idea of using a mobile phone as a legitimate learning tool in school seemed far-fetched, if not downright blasphemous. Kids were either prohibited from bringing their phones to school, or at the very least told to shut it off during school hours. But these days, it’s not unusual to hear a teacher say, “Class, turn on your cell. Harvard professor Chris Dede has been working in the field of education technology for decades, and is astonished at how quickly mobile devices are penetrating in schools. That’s not necessarily surprising, given that a staggering 80 percent of teens have cell phones. “People are talking about this being an inflection point,” said Elliot Soloway. “I’m petrified that we’ll apply new technology to old pedagogy.” The most recent data available is from 2010, and indicates that 62 percent of schools allow cell phones to be used on school grounds, though not in classrooms. More than 1.5 million iPads have been deployed in schools. This Related:  Week 4: "Mobile Learning"iPad/Mobile DevicesMobile Tech in the Classroom

To Ban or Not to Ban: Schools Weigh Cell Phone Policies Flickr:From_Ko Last week, a study by the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that cellphones have become “near ubiquitous”: 83% of American adults own one. Over half of all adult mobile phone owners had used their phones at least once to get information they needed right away. And more than a quarter said that they had experienced a situation in the previous month in which they had trouble doing something because they did not have their phones at hand. The findings of this Pew research — the reliance of adults on their cellphones — stands in sharp contrast to the policies of many schools, where cellphones remained banned or restricted. Students are “asked to do research on a desktop computer that absolutely has less processing power than the computer in their pocket.” For many schools, these are formal rules, written in school policy or in student handbooks. High school teacher Jamie Williams describes his school’s policy regarding cell phones: Related

Tweet, Tweet, Go the Kindergartners – SchoolBook “Tweet, tweet, tweet!” chirped the kindergartners in Jennifer Aaron's class last week, as they settled onto the multicolored carpet and began to consider what they would like to send out into the Twitter universe that day. Three days a week, as the school day draws to a close, the children in Ms. Aaron's class sit down to compose a message about what they have been doing all day. They then send it out to their parents and relatives through Twitter, the stamping grounds of celebrities and politicians, where few kindergartners have been known to venture. Ms. First, Ms. "We had to add more stickers," began Lucy, who did not elaborate, so Ms. "We learned about time!" The memories of the preceding seven hours pile up. "There were no lame reflections," said another student, referring to the end-of-day pieces all the students write, which on this particular day were of exemplary quality. With a few edits to the message, cutting it down to size, Ms. Luke: "We added more days in school stickers.

Educational Leadership:Understanding the Law:The Right to Search Students December 2001/January 2002 | Volume 59 | Number 4 Understanding the Law Pages 31-35 Kate R. Ehlenberger Littleton, Jonesboro, Springfield, West Paducah, and Pearl. The school tragedies in these communities brought the threat to school safety into the public conscience and moved school safety onto the U.S. public agenda. Students in U.S. public schools have the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable searches. The courts have recently expanded the right of school officials to conduct student searches, resulting in part from recent acts of school violence and heightened public scrutiny. Reasonable Suspicion The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. The Court articulated a standard for student searches: reasonable suspicion. In New Jersey v. Four students huddled together, one with money in his hand and another with his hand in his pocket, does not provide reasonable suspicion (A.S. v. articulating precisely what reasonable suspicion means . . . is not possible. Todd v. Preventive Search

Is All This Student Data Changing the Way Teachers Teach? Christy Novack works with students in her Burlingame, Calif. classroom. Francesca Segre/MindShift With so much access to student data these days, teachers are experimenting with different tactics, and figuring out what’s working and what’s not. As with most scenarios using education technology, it’s a mixed bag. For example, for Amy Walker, who teaches Spanish in a small, rural, low-income school in Marionville, Missouri, says using data can be helpful, but she’s leery of relying too heavily on it. “There is a place for data, but it can be overrated,” she says. Likewise, another educator raises a similar concern. But educators who do embrace data-driven teaching report that using data adds one more tool to their existing teaching tool chest, allowing them to help students in more specific areas of need. Of the hundreds of educational apps and software programs on the market, most fall into three categories: analytical, motivational and instructional tools. Pinpointing Student Needs Related

Schools across the country bring iPads to the classroom ARLINGTON, Va. — On a warm spring morning, a pair of first-grade boys enter the computer lab at Jamestown Elementary, a traditional-looking red-brick neighborhood school that's educated generations of students. The first-graders take a black cart, big enough that they both could fit in it, and push it down the hall to their classroom. It contains an Apple iPad for every student in their class. This school is anything but old school. Jamestown, part of the 21,000-student Arlington Public Schools, is on the leading edge of what many educators describe as the classroom edition of the digital revolution. "Kids are not only able to access material but use a number of tools to construct learning in a completely different way from what they've seen before," said Camilla Gagliolo, the instructional technology coordinator for Arlington Public Schools. Teachers in digital classrooms have become learning coaches, moving around the room and giving students more one-on-one instruction.

Reflections on Bullying (Cyber or otherwise) | Alaska Ed Tech I read an article this morning about a student who posted a dramatic note on Reddit, threatening to kill herself if a school bully wasn’t addressed in some way. The student, who identified herself as “Sarah” says of this bully, “It is hard to use the word because almost everyone knows and loves him.” (Huff Post, 2012) Sarah had reported this bully to school administration and no action had been taken. When I read this article, I remembered an NPR interview by Neil Conan a few years ago. A point made (and well-illustrated) during this interview: The bully is often socially intelligent. Debra Johnson, mother of bullying victim Jeffrey Johnson, stated that being bullied is no more a part of childhood than domestic violence is a part of marriage. From HometownAnnapolis.com: The Department of Student Services, Cicero said, also has done outreach within the community to encourage parents to be more aware of what their children are posting online.

How to Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools Does your staff need Educational Technology training? The K-12 Teachers Alliance can help you plan your in-service professional development at no additional cost. Regardless of your school’s cell phone policy, the reality in most schools is that students have phones in their pockets, purses, or hoodies. Why not get these tools out in plain sight and use them for good and not evil? Here are some easy to use strategies to use cell phones in the classrooms. Proven teaching strategies to boost your students' happiness. A few suggestions.on classroom activities that involve performance for... We point out some knowledgeable educators who quickly can become your trusted... Here are a few suggestions on how to motivate students intrinsically. Reasons why a class may be less likely to pipe up and interact during a lesson... Why Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools Cell phones are different from a computer lab filled with computers or a cart of netbooks because the cell phone is personal technology.

Want Increased Achievement Using iPads? Apple reports that 1.5 million iPads are used in K12. Given that there are approximately 55 million students in K12, the iPad has penetrated K12 faster than any other computing technology. And the tech tsunami doesn’t seem to be slowing down. What Do iPads Have to Do With It? Why would K12 administrators and teachers expect iPads to do what neither desktops nor laptops could do? Before you say we are anti-iPad, substitute any other mobile device for iPad and the argument presented here holds true. In fact, Hu pointed out that the failure of laptops was due to (1) lack of educational software, (2) lack of curriculum that exploited the software, and (3) lack of professional development. Essential Learning Devices The bottom line is that after spending all that money and effort outfitting all the students in a class, educators should not settle for just using them as supplemental tools. Cathleen Norris is a Regents Professor at the University of North Texas and a past ISTE President.

Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work? Getty Just a few years ago, the idea of using a mobile phone as a legitimate learning tool in school seemed far-fetched, if not downright blasphemous. Kids were either prohibited from bringing their phones to school, or at the very least told to shut it off during school hours. But these days, it’s not unusual to hear a teacher say, “Class, turn on your cell. It’s time to work.” Harvard professor Chris Dede has been working in the field of education technology for decades, and is astonished at how quickly mobile devices are penetrating in schools. That’s not necessarily surprising, given that a staggering 80 percent of teens have cell phones. “People are talking about this being an inflection point,” said Elliot Soloway. “I’m petrified that we’ll apply new technology to old pedagogy.” The most recent data available is from 2010, and indicates that 62 percent of schools allow cell phones to be used on school grounds, though not in classrooms. This Actually some schools are seeing gains.

Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool? The final version of the National Education Technology Plan (NETP) was released last week, setting forth the Obama Administration's plan for improving access to and integration of technologies for teaching and learning. Among the recommendations the Department of Education makes in the NETP is a call for support for "efforts to ensure that all students and educators have 24/7 access to the Internet via devices, including mobile devices, and that states, districts, and schools adopt technologies and policies to enable leveraging the technology that students already have." The push for "24/7 access to the Internet" falls under another the auspices of yet another endeavor, the National Broadband Plan. But the call for better access to Internet-ready devices, particularly utilizing tools the students already possess is an interesting one. This series on Education Technology is underwritten by Dell. Cellphones: Teens' Primary Communication and Computing Device, Banned from Most Schools

iPads in Education - Exploring the use of iPads and mobile devices in education. "It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education ... If we are to develop our students' sense of curiosity, we must be mindful to carve out time to allow our students to inquire and explore." -- Albert Einstein Mobile devices promise to dramatically impact education. This Ning network was created to explore ways iPads and other portable devices could be used to re-imagine the process of education and re-kindle students' innate desire to learn. Let's hear from you!

More School Districts Welcome Cell Phones in the Class Innovation in ISD No longer afraid of giving kids access to the Internet, a growing number of school districts are developing digital media policies that emphasize responsibility over fear. By Heather Chaplin Since early 2001, every school accepting federal funding for discounted Internet access through the government’s E-rate program had to do two things – block “harmful” sites and create an Acceptable Use Policy. The mantra of schools back then was pretty simple: Keep it out. “It’s a historical hiccup in the history of learning,” said Rich Halverson, a learning scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the lead researcher on KidGrid, a mobile app that helps teachers study and analyze student data. Fear was definitely the word you heard when talking to school administrators – no doubt partly because in the age of the Internet, 2001 was a long time ago, and the Web was still unknown territory for plenty of people back then. “You can build as big a moat as you want,” he said.

A Principal's Perspective: Preparing to Distribute Student iPads? Yes, let's give students iPads so they can be smarter and learn better. It sounds so easy. The reality is that there are many unknowns, like how do you hand out 800 iPads and keep track of which student has which iPad, and how do you get 800 students to register with iTunes so they can use their iPads on the school system? (The school system: How do you provide enough bandwidth for 800 iPads? That's another challenge entirely!) As principal, here are questions myself and faculty have been faced with: What if I lose my iPad? These many questions and a hundred more from the students, teachers, and parents are being answered one by one in my iPad experience. The iPad Rationale Our school district has a high number of low-income families, and one of the reasons for lending each ninth and tenth grader an iPad for the school year is an effort to eliminate the well-known "digital divide." Tackling the Challenges Cost Insurance Ownership "So what happens at the end of the year?" What's Next?

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