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Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work?

Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work?
Getty Just a few years ago, the idea of using a mobile phone as a legitimate learning tool in school seemed far-fetched, if not downright blasphemous. Kids were either prohibited from bringing their phones to school, or at the very least told to shut it off during school hours. But these days, it’s not unusual to hear a teacher say, “Class, turn on your cell. It’s time to work.” Harvard professor Chris Dede has been working in the field of education technology for decades, and is astonished at how quickly mobile devices are penetrating in schools. That’s not necessarily surprising, given that a staggering 80 percent of teens have cell phones. “People are talking about this being an inflection point,” said Elliot Soloway. “I’m petrified that we’ll apply new technology to old pedagogy.” The most recent data available is from 2010, and indicates that 62 percent of schools allow cell phones to be used on school grounds, though not in classrooms. This Actually some schools are seeing gains.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/03/amidst-a-mobile-revolution-in-schools-will-old-teaching-tactics-prevail/

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To Ban or Not to Ban: Schools Weigh Cell Phone Policies Flickr:From_Ko Last week, a study by the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that cellphones have become “near ubiquitous”: 83% of American adults own one. Over half of all adult mobile phone owners had used their phones at least once to get information they needed right away. And more than a quarter said that they had experienced a situation in the previous month in which they had trouble doing something because they did not have their phones at hand. Tweet, Tweet, Go the Kindergartners – SchoolBook “Tweet, tweet, tweet!” chirped the kindergartners in Jennifer Aaron's class last week, as they settled onto the multicolored carpet and began to consider what they would like to send out into the Twitter universe that day. Three days a week, as the school day draws to a close, the children in Ms. Aaron's class sit down to compose a message about what they have been doing all day. They then send it out to their parents and relatives through Twitter, the stamping grounds of celebrities and politicians, where few kindergartners have been known to venture. Ms.

Educational Leadership:Understanding the Law:The Right to Search Students December 2001/January 2002 | Volume 59 | Number 4 Understanding the Law Pages 31-35 Kate R. Ehlenberger Littleton, Jonesboro, Springfield, West Paducah, and Pearl. The school tragedies in these communities brought the threat to school safety into the public conscience and moved school safety onto the U.S. public agenda.

Is All This Student Data Changing the Way Teachers Teach? Christy Novack works with students in her Burlingame, Calif. classroom. Francesca Segre/MindShift With so much access to student data these days, teachers are experimenting with different tactics, and figuring out what’s working and what’s not. As with most scenarios using education technology, it’s a mixed bag. Schools across the country bring iPads to the classroom ARLINGTON, Va. — On a warm spring morning, a pair of first-grade boys enter the computer lab at Jamestown Elementary, a traditional-looking red-brick neighborhood school that's educated generations of students. The first-graders take a black cart, big enough that they both could fit in it, and push it down the hall to their classroom. It contains an Apple iPad for every student in their class. This school is anything but old school. Jamestown, part of the 21,000-student Arlington Public Schools, is on the leading edge of what many educators describe as the classroom edition of the digital revolution.

Reflections on Bullying (Cyber or otherwise) I read an article this morning about a student who posted a dramatic note on Reddit, threatening to kill herself if a school bully wasn’t addressed in some way. The student, who identified herself as “Sarah” says of this bully, “It is hard to use the word because almost everyone knows and loves him.” (Huff Post, 2012) Sarah had reported this bully to school administration and no action had been taken. When I read this article, I remembered an NPR interview by Neil Conan a few years ago. How to Use Cell Phones as Learning Tools Does your staff need Educational Technology training? The K-12 Teachers Alliance can help you plan your in-service professional development at no additional cost. Regardless of your school’s cell phone policy, the reality in most schools is that students have phones in their pockets, purses, or hoodies. Why not get these tools out in plain sight and use them for good and not evil? Here are some easy to use strategies to use cell phones in the classrooms. 7 things to know about the teaching profession before becoming an educator.

Want Increased Achievement Using iPads? Apple reports that 1.5 million iPads are used in K12. Given that there are approximately 55 million students in K12, the iPad has penetrated K12 faster than any other computing technology. And the tech tsunami doesn’t seem to be slowing down. Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work? Getty Just a few years ago, the idea of using a mobile phone as a legitimate learning tool in school seemed far-fetched, if not downright blasphemous. Kids were either prohibited from bringing their phones to school, or at the very least told to shut it off during school hours. But these days, it’s not unusual to hear a teacher say, “Class, turn on your cell. It’s time to work.” Harvard professor Chris Dede has been working in the field of education technology for decades, and is astonished at how quickly mobile devices are penetrating in schools.

Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool? The final version of the National Education Technology Plan (NETP) was released last week, setting forth the Obama Administration's plan for improving access to and integration of technologies for teaching and learning. Among the recommendations the Department of Education makes in the NETP is a call for support for "efforts to ensure that all students and educators have 24/7 access to the Internet via devices, including mobile devices, and that states, districts, and schools adopt technologies and policies to enable leveraging the technology that students already have." The push for "24/7 access to the Internet" falls under another the auspices of yet another endeavor, the National Broadband Plan. But the call for better access to Internet-ready devices, particularly utilizing tools the students already possess is an interesting one.

iPads in Education - Exploring the use of iPads and mobile devices in education. "It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education ... If we are to develop our students' sense of curiosity, we must be mindful to carve out time to allow our students to inquire and explore." -- Albert Einstein Mobile devices promise to dramatically impact education. This Ning network was created to explore ways iPads and other portable devices could be used to re-imagine the process of education and re-kindle students' innate desire to learn. Let's hear from you!

More School Districts Welcome Cell Phones in the Class Innovation in ISD No longer afraid of giving kids access to the Internet, a growing number of school districts are developing digital media policies that emphasize responsibility over fear. By Heather Chaplin A Principal's Perspective: Preparing to Distribute Student iPads? Yes, let's give students iPads so they can be smarter and learn better. It sounds so easy. The reality is that there are many unknowns, like how do you hand out 800 iPads and keep track of which student has which iPad, and how do you get 800 students to register with iTunes so they can use their iPads on the school system? (The school system: How do you provide enough bandwidth for 800 iPads? That's another challenge entirely!)

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