background preloader

Meme

Meme
A meme (/ˈmiːm/ meem)[1] is "an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture."[2] A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices that can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena with a mimicked theme. Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures.[3] The word meme is a shortening (modeled on gene) of mimeme (from Ancient Greek μίμημα Greek pronunciation: [míːmɛːma] mīmēma, "imitated thing", from μιμεῖσθαι mimeisthai, "to imitate", from μῖμος mimos "mime")[4] and it was coined by the British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976)[1][5] as a concept for discussion of evolutionary principles in explaining the spread of ideas and cultural phenomena. Dawkins' own position is somewhat ambiguous: he obviously welcomed N. History[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meme

Related:  13/2/7 - 00quotes, sayings, words & phrasesWORTH READING

Police in North Carolina Patrol in a Corvette The nonpolice version of the Corvette Z06. Speeders in Wake County, N.C., will have to go pretty fast if they want to outrun the police department’s latest interceptor — a Chevrolet Corvette Z06. The Wake County police recently seized the Corvette from a drug dealer, said David Cooke, the county manager, according to the News & Observer. The car is being used to patrol Interstate 40. The county sheriff, Donnie Harrison, however, was apparently less forthcoming with the local paper.

Semantic satiation History and research[edit] Leon Jakobovits James coined the phrase "semantic satiation" in his 1962 doctoral dissertation at McGill University, Montreal, Canada.[1] Prior to that, the expression "verbal satiation" had been used along with terms that express the idea of mental fatigue. The dissertation listed many of the names others had used for the phenomenon: Many other names have been used for what appears to be essentially the same process: inhibition (Herbert, 1824, in Boring, 1950), refractory phase and mental fatigue (Dodge, 1917; 1926a), lapse of meaning (Bassett and Warne, 1919), work decrement (Robinson and Bills, 1926), cortical inhibition (Pavlov, 192?) The explanation for the phenomenon is that, in the cortex, verbal repetition repeatedly arouses a specific neural pattern that corresponds to the meaning of the word. Rapid repetition makes both the peripheral sensorimotor activity and central neural activation fire repeatedly.

I do not fear death - Memoirs Roger Ebert was always a great friend of Salon's. We're deeply saddened by reports of his death, and are re-printing this essay, from his book "Life Itself: A Memoir," which we think fans will take particular comfort in reading now. I know it is coming, and I do not fear it, because I believe there is nothing on the other side of death to fear. I hope to be spared as much pain as possible on the approach path. I was perfectly content before I was born, and I think of death as the same state.

Memetic engineering Memetic engineering is a term developed and coined by Leveious Rolando, John Sokol, and Gibran Burchett while they researched and observed the behavior of people after being purposely exposed (knowingly and unknowingly) to certain memetic themes. The term is based on Richard Dawkins' theory of memes. The process of developing memes, through meme-splicing and memetic synthesis, with the intent of altering the behavior of others in society or humanity.The process of creating and developing theories or ideologies based on an analytical study of societies, cultures, their ways of thinking and the evolution of their minds.The process of modifying human beliefs, thought patterns, etc.

Egocide and suicide | The Psychology of Me Lately, I’ve been thinking about egocide. (Why does my autocorrect want to change that to “geocode”??) I’m at the end of my rope and climbing back up is not an option. oscar mike The letters o (oscar) and m (mike) of the military phonetic alphabet which when used together indicates that a unit is "On the Move" or sometimes, "On Mission." Headquarters ordered us to relocate our fighting positions AGAIN today, so we are fucking Oscar Mike. Goddamnit. Infinity Ward's new favorite fetish word. Implemented in everyday or formal use, in any circumstance, at any time, wherever IW thinks it sounds awesome and also rad.

Why libertarianism fails in health care During Monday’s debate, CNN’s Wolf Blitzer asked whether an uninsured 30-year-old who had chosen to go without insurance should be left to die if he falls unexpectedly ill. Ron Paul dodged the question. “What he should do is whatever he wants to do and take responsibility for himself,” Paul said. “That’s what freedom is about.” Blitzer pressed the issue. “But, Congressman, are you saying the society should just let him die?” Wired 2.10: Meme, Counter-meme Meme, Counter-meme By Mike Godwin It was back in 1990 that I set out on a project in memetic engineering. The Nazi-comparison meme, I'd decided, had gotten out of hand - in countless Usenet newsgroups, in many conferences on the Well, and on every BBS that I frequented, the labeling of posters or their ideas as "similar to the Nazis" or "Hitler-like" was a recurrent and often predictable event. It was the kind of thing that made you wonder how debates had ever occurred without having that handy rhetorical hammer.

This is Why I'll Never be an Adult I have repeatedly discovered that it is important for me not to surpass my capacity for responsibility. Over the years, this capacity has grown, but the results of exceeding it have not changed. Normally, my capacity is exceeded gradually, through the accumulation of simple, daily tasks.

Shenanigans Deception or tomfoolery on the part of carnival stand operators. "Officer Barbrady, I call shenanigans!" An official declaration made by patrons of an establishment who feel they have been cheated. Once a charge of shenanigans has been accepted by an authority figure, said patrons are free to assault the owners of said establishment with brooms.

Goodreads Tap into the world's largest social network for readers with the Goodreads Android app! Read thousands of book reviews by your friends and other Goodreads members, keep a virtual bookshelf of what you've read, and build your to-read list as you discover great books on the app. Goodreads is a free service for everyone who reads. We have more than 8,500,000 members who have added more than 300,000,000 books.

Related:  e-learningthe memetic approachandruasduartemakerwriting