background preloader

English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions

English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions
Use the navigation above to browse our A-Z of English idioms … If you have a question about idioms, ask us about it in our Idioms Discussion Forum. If you know of an idiom that you would like to be listed here, please use our online form to suggest an idiom. Below are listed the latest 30 entries that have been added to our database of English idioms & idiomatic expressions. Subscribe to our idioms feed to keep up-to-date: Members Get More - Sign up for free and gain access to many more English idioms and slang expressions.

http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/

Related:  Idioms, quotes, expressions/phrases & sayingsIdiomsraquelximenaIdioms-ExpressionsCommunication Theory

English Phrasal Verbs A reference of 3,429 current English Phrasal Verbs (also called multi-word verbs) with definitions and examples. If you have a question about phrasal verbs, ask us about it in our English Phrasal Verbs Forum. Subscribe The 50 most useful Idioms and their Meaning - A list on 1 page Commonly used Idioms Idiom: a manner of speaking that is natural to native speakers of a language Every language has its own collection of wise sayings. They offer advice about how to live and also transfer some underlying ideas, principles and values of a given culture / society. These sayings are called "idioms" - or proverbs if they are longer. These combinations of words have (rarely complete sentences) a "figurative meaning" meaning, they basically work with "pictures".

Idioms used by native speakers Those of us who grew up with English as our first language have been exposed to idioms and idiomatic expressions for most of our lives. They may have confused us a little when we were children, but explanation and constant exposure not only increased our understanding of them, but likely drew them into our own vernacular. If you’re in the process of learning the English language, you may come across some of these and not be entirely sure what they mean. Here’s a list of 20 that you’re likely to come across fairly often: 1. A Chip on Your Shoulder Bit By Bit, 'The Information' Reveals Everything The InformationBy James GleickHardcover, 544 pagesPantheonList Price: $29.95 We can see now that information is what our world runs on: the blood and the fuel, the vital principle. It pervades the sciences from top to bottom, transforming every branch of knowledge.

Idioms Idioms and idiomatic expressions in English An idiom is a group of words in current usage having a meaning that is not deducible from those of the individual words. For example, "to rain cats and dogs" - which means "to rain very heavily" - is an idiom; and "over the moon" - which means "extremely happy" - is another idiom. In both cases, you would have a hard time understanding the real meaning if you did not already know these idioms! Expressions & Sayings Index If you prefer to go directly to the meaning and origin of a specific expression, click on its relevant entry in the alphabetical list below. Use this alphabet to speed up your search: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

What do idioms look like? Ahead of his talk at IATEFL 2011 entitled ‘Don’t give up on idioms and phrasal verbs’, Stuart Redman, co-author of Oxford Word Skills, ‘gets to the bottom of‘ idioms in the English language. What’s the first thing that comes into your mind when you see these expressions? - kick the bucket – be barking up the wrong tree – a storm in a teacup

Transmission Model of Communication Introduction Here I will outline and critique a particular, very well-known model of communication developed by Shannon and Weaver (1949), as the prototypical example of a transmissive model of communication: a model which reduces communication to a process of 'transmitting information'. The underlying metaphor of communication as transmission underlies 'commonsense' everyday usage but is in many ways misleading and repays critical attention. Shannon and Weaver's model is one which is, in John Fiske's words, 'widely accepted as one of the main seeds out of which Communication Studies has grown' (Fiske 1982: 6). Claude Shannon and Warren Weaver were not social scientists but engineers working for Bell Telephone Labs in the United States.

Idioms - A Idiom Advice Using the idioms, give advice to these people: Tom: I really want to go see a movie tonight, but I'm trying to save my money to buy a new watch. Advice:_____________________________________________ Julie: I just saw my brother's girlfriend with another boy, but he's in a really bad mood because he got fired this morning. Do you think I should tell him?

Idioms with Numbers (Sian Baldwin a4esl.org Idioms with Numbers Click the answer button to see the correct answer. If you are dressed up to the ___ , you are wearing fancy clothes. If you are at ___ , you are confused and don't know what to do. A ___ letter word is one that is considered rude or vulgar. Richard Bach: One More Communication Theory Introduction As many have noted, human communication is an extremely complex field of study. Many have researched it, and these scholars have developed many definitions and theories surrounding the subject. In this same tradition, I too have the opportunity to contribute to this body of knowledge in a productive manner. Specifically, I have my own communication theory to share (or rather, an evolution of an earlier theory). Defining Communication

Idioms – as clear as mud? Miranda Steel is a freelance ELT lexicographer and editor. She has worked as a Senior Editor for dictionaries for learners at OUP and has also worked for COBUILD. In this post, she looks at some of the weird and wonderful idioms in the English language. Idioms and Expressions with Eggs and Bunnies (Donna Tatsuki a4esl.org Idioms and Expressions with Eggs and Bunnies Click the answer button to see the answer. To egg someone on means:a. The World is Your Oyster In my last blog post, I wrote about some of the vocabulary that we associate with the season of autumn. Words like apples, leaves, pumpkin, nuts, squirrels, trees, orange, red, soup, casserole, golden, chestnuts, mist and plenty more. In this post, I’d like to share with you 10 idioms that I’ve found related to some of the words above. So let’s start with the word ‘autumn’ itself. 1. Autumn years – it is often used to refer to the later years in someone’s life“In his autumn years, Peter was able to enjoy his garden a lot more”

"An idiom is a phrase where the words together have a meaning that is different from the dictionary definitions of the individual words, which can make idioms hard for ESL students and learners to understand. Here, we provide a dictionary of 3,735 English idiomatic expressions with definitions." by macopa May 14

Related:  Improve your general English languageAnglaisVocabulary/LexisProverbs and IdiomsEnglishIdiomsidioms