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Primer (film)

Primer (film)
Primer is a 2004 American science fiction drama film about the accidental discovery of a means of time travel. The film was written, directed, and produced by Shane Carruth. Primer is of note for its extremely low budget (completed for $7,000), experimental plot structure, philosophical implications, and complex technical dialogue, which Carruth, a college graduate with a degree in mathematics and a former engineer, chose not to simplify for the sake of the audience.[2] The film collected the Grand Jury Prize at the 2004 Sundance Film Festival, before securing a limited release in the United States, and has since gained a cult following.[3] The operation of time travel in Primer. After arguing over the project that the group should tackle next, Aaron and Abe independently pursue work on technology intended to reduce the weight of an object. Having traveled back four days in time using this failsafe point, Abe goes to meet Aaron and collapses. List of films featuring time loops Related:  13/2/7 - 00A Sense of Time

Swingers (1996 film) Mike Peters (Jon Favreau) is a struggling actor who left New York, and a girlfriend behind, to find success in L.A. The move caused his girlfriend of six years to split up with him six months earlier and left him feeling alone and heartbroken. In the opening scenes of the film, Mike talks about his situation with his friend Rob (Ron Livingston), another thespian from back east. On the ride home, Trent gets Mike to feel better about himself and to look at the positive side of things. Now back in L.A., Mike and Rob get together for some golf and to talk shop. The guys agree to head to their favorite after hours spot and after watching Trent and Sue effortlessly meet some girls, Mike is clearly shown feeling lower than ever but not yet defeated. The swingers leave the lounge and narrowly miss getting into a brawl in the parking lot caused by Sue's temper yet averted by Sue pulling a gun which no one else was aware was even a part of his attire. A still from Swingers Filming locations

'Time Crystals' Could Upend Physicists' Theory of Time | Wired Science Physicists plan to create a “time crystal” — a theoretical object that moves in a repeating pattern without using energy — inside a device called an ion trap. Image: Hartmut Häffner In February 2012, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Frank Wilczek decided to go public with a strange and, he worried, somewhat embarrassing idea. “Most research in physics is continuations of things that have gone before,” said Wilczek, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Wilczek’s idea met with a muted response from physicists. Now, a technological advance has made it possible for physicists to test the idea. A Crazy Concept The idea came to Wilczek while he was preparing a class lecture in 2010. When matter crystallizes, its atoms spontaneously organize themselves into the rows, columns and stacks of a three-dimensional lattice. The Nobel Prize-winning physicist Frank Wilczek often develops outlandish theories that eventually enter the mainstream. The Big Test

Pearls Before Breakfast - washingtonpost.com HE EMERGED FROM THE METRO AT THE L'ENFANT PLAZA STATION AND POSITIONED HIMSELF AGAINST A WALL BESIDE A TRASH BASKET. By most measures, he was nondescript: a youngish white man in jeans, a long-sleeved T-shirt and a Washington Nationals baseball cap. From a small case, he removed a violin. Placing the open case at his feet, he shrewdly threw in a few dollars and pocket change as seed money, swiveled it to face pedestrian traffic, and began to play. It was 7:51 a.m. on Friday, January 12, the middle of the morning rush hour. Each passerby had a quick choice to make, one familiar to commuters in any urban area where the occasional street performer is part of the cityscape: Do you stop and listen? On that Friday in January, those private questions would be answered in an unusually public way. The musician did not play popular tunes whose familiarity alone might have drawn interest. The acoustics proved surprisingly kind. So, what do you think happened? So, a crowd would gather? "Oh, yes."

chickenknuckles comments on How do you respond to clients that do not want to pay you the rate you have established for yourself? The Little Metronome That Wouldn't : Krulwich Wonders... If this wasn't a science page, if this happened 3,000 years ago in, say, a Middle Eastern desert, I would call it a Miracle. But it's not. It's just a plain, ordinary moment of "wow!" First, the beginner's version. But why? Even more simply stated: As the metronomes tick back and forth, they affect the table, and because the table is designed to absorb the motion of the metronomes, the table itself starts to move. That's what you saw in our small, chamber music version. This time, we'll have a much bigger table with 32 brightly colored metronomes — a Mormon Tabernacle Choir of metronomes — all misaligned. They once made a movie about that stubborn metronome.

reftut <div class="noscript"><p><strong>Please note: Many features of this site require JavaScript. You appear to have JavaScript disabled, or are running a non-JavaScript capable web browser.</strong></p><p> To get the best experience, please enable JavaScript or download a modern web browser such as <a href=" Explorer 8</a>, <a href=" <a href=" or <a href=" Chrome</a>. </p></div> perlreftut - Mark's very short tutorial about references One of the most important new features in Perl 5 was the capability to manage complicated data structures like multidimensional arrays and nested hashes. Fortunately, you only need to know 10% of what's in the main page to get 90% of the benefit. One problem that comes up all the time is needing a hash whose values are lists. Make Rule 1

Females of Reddit, does nipple sucking turn you on or is it just a stupid thing guys like to do? : AskReddit The incredible truth about time | Focus Magazine | Science and Technology Theories of science have ignored time... until now. A new idea reveals how it created the Universe - and you, writes Robert Matthews. Time: it rules our lives, and we all wish we had more of it. Businesses make money out of it, and scientists can measure it with astonishing accuracy. Earlier this year, American researchers unveiled an atomic clock accurate to better than one second since the Big Bang 14 billion years ago. But what, exactly, is time? What exactly is the true nature of time? Yet according to theoretical physicist Lee Smolin, the time has come to grapple with this ancient conundrum: “Understanding the nature of time is the single most important problem facing science,” he says. As one of the founders of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Ontario, Canada, which specialises in tackling fundamental questions in physics, Professor Smolin has spent more time pondering deep questions than most. To most people, this may sound a bit overblown. Timeless physics

Copenhagen interpretation The Copenhagen interpretation is one of the earliest and most commonly taught interpretations of quantum mechanics.[1] It holds that quantum mechanics does not yield a description of an objective reality but deals only with probabilities of observing, or measuring, various aspects of energy quanta, entities that fit neither the classical idea of particles nor the classical idea of waves. The act of measurement causes the set of probabilities to immediately and randomly assume only one of the possible values. This feature of mathematics is known as wavefunction collapse. According to John Cramer, "Despite an extensive literature which refers to, discusses, and criticizes the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, nowhere does there seem to be any concise statement which defines the full Copenhagen interpretation Background[edit] The Copenhagen interpretation is an attempt to explain the mathematical formulations of quantum mechanics and the corresponding experimental results. 1.

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