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Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement

A while back, I was asked, "What engages students?" Sure, I could respond, sharing anecdotes about what I believed to be engaging, but I thought it would be so much better to lob that question to my own eighth graders. The responses I received from all 220 of them seemed to fall under 10 categories, representing reoccuring themes that appeared again and again. So, from the mouths of babes, here are my students' answers to the question: "What engages students?" 1. Working with their peers "Middle-school students are growing learners who require and want interaction with other people to fully attain their potential." "Teens find it most interesting and exciting when there is a little bit of talking involved. 2. "I believe that when students participate in "learning by doing" it helps them focus more. "We have entered a digital age of video, Facebook, Twitter, etc., and they [have] become more of a daily thing for teens and students. 3. "I believe that it all boils down to relationships. 4.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/student-engagement-stories-heather-wolpert-gawron

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Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say Claire Handscombe has a commitment problem online. Like a lot of Web surfers, she clicks on links posted on social networks, reads a few sentences, looks for exciting words, and then grows restless, scampering off to the next page she probably won’t commit to. “I give it a few seconds — not even minutes — and then I’m moving again,” says Handscombe, a 35-year-old graduate student in creative writing at American University. But it’s not just online anymore. She finds herself behaving the same way with a novel. What <em>Is</em> Student Engagement, Anyway? (EDUCAUSE Quarterly When EDUCAUSE Quarterly asked me to be a columnist on the topic of student engagement, my first question was, “What is student engagement?” This question seems like a good point of departure for exploring the topic in this first of four columns. To answer this question, I started with the word “engagement.”

Assessment Design: A Matrix To Assess Your Assessments Assessment Design: A Matrix To Assess Your Assessments by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education On Rigor, Language, & Verbs 26 Keys to Student Engagement My Joyful Jubilant Learning, colleague, David Zinger recently started an Employee Engagement alphabet. Engagement is such a hot topic in education, I thought this was a great idea for educators to follow the lead. So, here it goes: 26 Keys to Student Engagement. Authenticity: We hear it all the time, "Why do we need to know this stuff? When will I ever use this?"

Employers Challenge to Educators: Make School Relevant to Students’ Lives Andreas Levers/Flickr Business leaders and economic thinkers are worried that today’s students aren’t leaving school with the skills they’ll need to succeed in the workplace. Representatives from tech companies and hiring experts are looking for applicants who show individuality, confidence in their abilities, ability to identify and communicate their strengths, and who are capable of thinking on their feet.

Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement Tristan de Frondeville As a teacher, my goal was to go home at the end of each day with more energy than I had at the beginning of the day. Seriously. Now, as I travel the country coaching teachers on how to successfully use project learning, my goal remains the same. How do you use the last five minutes? How do you ensure every student has left the classroom feeling they have learned and accomplished something, no matter how small? The last five minutes of a lesson are crucial. They offer an invaluable chance to wrap up and consolidate what has been discussed, as well as evaluate student progress. It’s also an ideal time to reflect on and develop ideas and discussions.

A Handy Chart Featuring 8 Ways to Do Formative Assessment April 5, 2014 As a follow up to the materials I have already posted on formative assessment, I am introducing you today this wonderful chat that I learned about through Bianca. The chart features 8 strategies teachers can use to conduct a formative assessment. By definition, formative assessment is assessment for learning (summative assessment is assessment of learning ) which usually takes place simultaneously with learning. The aim of formative assessment is to students understanding and plan subsequent instruction. In the chart below, you will get to discover 8 ways you can check for students comprehension, have a look and share with us what you think of it. 10 Engaging Games for Summer Learning For this week's Top Picks List Friday, we're featuring games for summer learning. Anything remotely school related is a total summer-break bummer. But that doesn't mean the learning has to stop.

Simple Student Engagement Strategies - Mr. Guymon's Classroom "I love seeing blank stares from my students after posing a question about what we are learning," said no teacher ever. Still, we have all been there. While many students sit like logs, waiting for someone to act on them, equally discouraging are the hogs, those four or five students who always have their hand up. I'm not immune to the situation, bet here are three strategies that I use in my classroom that help to engage all students in discussions that you might consider using too. House of Cards

IB Physics: Start with the misconception Saturday 23 January 2016 View all posts It's a big problem that students often remember what they have learnt before rather than what we try to teach them. I recently had some swimming lessons, I'm not a very good swimmer so the instructor had lots of useful tips as to how I could improve my technique.

There is some great information on how to catch and keep the students engaged in classroom instruction and activities. by hermansenh Oct 28

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