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Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement

A while back, I was asked, "What engages students?" Sure, I could respond, sharing anecdotes about what I believed to be engaging, but I thought it would be so much better to lob that question to my own eighth graders. The responses I received from all 220 of them seemed to fall under 10 categories, representing reoccuring themes that appeared again and again. So, from the mouths of babes, here are my students' answers to the question: "What engages students?" 1. Working with their peers "Middle-school students are growing learners who require and want interaction with other people to fully attain their potential." "Teens find it most interesting and exciting when there is a little bit of talking involved. 2. "I believe that when students participate in "learning by doing" it helps them focus more. "We have entered a digital age of video, Facebook, Twitter, etc., and they [have] become more of a daily thing for teens and students. 3. "I believe that it all boils down to relationships. 4.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/student-engagement-stories-heather-wolpert-gawron

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20 Ways to Keep Your Students' Attention - Minds in Bloom If you struggle with making anchor charts, then this post from Sara at Inclusive Insights is for you! minds-in-bloom.com/2016/05/anchor-charts-101-keep-simple-keep-clean.html ... See MoreSee Less Photo End of the Year Reflection Questions ... See MoreSee Less 7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom 7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom by Barbara Blackburn, author of Rigor is not a 4-Letter Word Despite all the research, there are seven myths about rigor that are often heard.

What <em>Is</em> Student Engagement, Anyway? (EDUCAUSE Quarterly When EDUCAUSE Quarterly asked me to be a columnist on the topic of student engagement, my first question was, “What is student engagement?” This question seems like a good point of departure for exploring the topic in this first of four columns. To answer this question, I started with the word “engagement.” Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say Claire Handscombe has a commitment problem online. Like a lot of Web surfers, she clicks on links posted on social networks, reads a few sentences, looks for exciting words, and then grows restless, scampering off to the next page she probably won’t commit to. “I give it a few seconds — not even minutes — and then I’m moving again,” says Handscombe, a 35-year-old graduate student in creative writing at American University. But it’s not just online anymore. She finds herself behaving the same way with a novel.

20 Ways to Keep Your Students' Attention As the end of the year approaches, it can be more and more challenging to keep your students' attention. Brain Breaks are important, but there are plenty of things you can do within a lesson to keep kids from day dreaming...or worse yet, nodding off. Here are some ideas:Desk Switch: Students have ten seconds (count down from ten) to find another desk to sit in that is in a different part of the room than his or her normal desk. Students stay in that desk for the rest of the lesson. Why? Striving for Higher-Order Thinking and Depth of Knowledge A little over a year ago, I read Higher-order thinking is the exception rather than the norm for most classrooms on Scott McLeod's blog, Dangerously Irrelevant, and have been mulling it over, wondering if our school district is any different. Over the past year, our teachers periodically collect data with their teams on the types of questions/tasks they ask students. One teacher records teacher questions and the other records student responses on a shared Google Doc; then teams sort through their own data, plotting teacher questions by Bloom's Revised Taxonomy, and student responses to those questions/tasks with Webb's Depth of Knowledge (DOK).

26 Keys to Student Engagement My Joyful Jubilant Learning, colleague, David Zinger recently started an Employee Engagement alphabet. Engagement is such a hot topic in education, I thought this was a great idea for educators to follow the lead. So, here it goes: 26 Keys to Student Engagement. Authenticity: We hear it all the time, "Why do we need to know this stuff? When will I ever use this?" Arts Integration Lesson: Historical Figures Mashup Who doesn’t love a good mashup? From Madonna to Zombies, mashups are a way into pop culture and lead to big opportunities for creative expression. In today’s free high school arts integration lesson, we’re using those mashups to help connect social studies, literature and media arts in a brand new way. Enter: historical figures! One of the best things about this lesson are the discussions that happen.

4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers According to Indiana University Bloomington, Inquiry-based learning is an “instructional model that centers learning on a solving a particular problem or answering a central question. There are several different inquiry-based learning models, but most have several general elements in common: Learning focuses around a meaningful, ill-structured problem that demands consideration of diverse perspectivesAcademic content-learning occurs as a natural part of the process as students work towards finding solutionsLearners, working collaboratively, assume an active role in the learning processTeachers provide learners with learning supports and rich multiple media sources of information to assist students in successfully finding solutionsLearners share and defend solutions publicly in some manner”

Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement Tristan de Frondeville As a teacher, my goal was to go home at the end of each day with more energy than I had at the beginning of the day. Seriously. Now, as I travel the country coaching teachers on how to successfully use project learning, my goal remains the same. Music as a Teaching Tool Many teachers shy away from including music in their classrooms because they presume they need musical training to use music as a teaching tool. However, there are multiple ways to implement music in the classroom that don’t require any training. Classroom Strategies In the early grades, transitions are a little harder to set because the students are still learning what the concept of a minute is and what one feels like. A song can improve transitions because it becomes a behavior cue: Students grow accustomed to the length of the song or part of a song and internalize the time they have to move on to the next task, which helps them begin to take responsibility for their own learning. Many of us know that music will get you up and moving.

There is some great information on how to catch and keep the students engaged in classroom instruction and activities. by hermansenh Oct 28

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