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What works best

What works best
This page has now been revised (May 2010) in the light of John Hattie's recent apparently definitive work Visible Learning; a synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement (London; Routledge, 2009). The first thing to change has been the title, which used to be "What works and what doesn't". Hattie points out that in education most things work, more or less. The questions are around those which work best and therefore best repay the effort invested. This site is mainly about your own individual practice as a teacher, and as such it tries to take into account your particular circumstances, such as the students you teach (assumed largely to be over school-age), your subject, your setting (school, college, university, work-based or informal adult education). It recognises that it is difficult and even unreasonable to generalise, but we ought to set alongside this the results of very generalised research in the form of meta-analyses. Hattie, 2009: 7-8 (my emphasis) Feedback But!

http://www.learningandteaching.info/teaching/what_works.htm

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What works in education – Hattie’s list of the greatest effects and why it matters I have been a fan of John Hattie’s work ever since I encountered Visible Learning. Hattie has done the most exhaustive meta-analysis in education. Thanks to him, we can gauge not only the relative effectiveness of almost every educational intervention under the sun but we can compare these interventions on an absolute scale of effect size. Perhaps most importantly, Hattie was able to identify a ‘hinge point’ (as he calls it) from exhaustively comparing everything: the effect size of .40.

What can we learn from John Hattie Ask not what works; instead ask: what works best? ‘Perhaps education’s equivalent to the search for the holy grail…’ (TES) “It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book.” Friedrich Nietzsche, 1885 A casual glance through John Hattie’s CV shows just how prolific an educationalist he is.

Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week. 1. BE FLEXIBLE. The less educators try to control what kids learn, the more students’ voices will be heard and, eventually, their ability to drive their own learning.

Making learning Visible (John Hattie) Auckland University Professor John Hattie has recently authored a study, based on research into 83 million students, studying effective teachers around the world and has come up with some reassuring results for creative teachers. It's all about trusting relationships and 'oodles of feedback'. Note - it is not about national testing, our government's highly unoriginal plan. Click here for latest blogA link For more undated thinking about Hattie

Overview - The Reading The mission of the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project is to help young people become avid and skilled readers, writers, and inquirers. We accomplish this goal through research, curriculum development, and through working shoulder-to-shoulder with students, teachers, and school leaders. The organization has developed state-of-the-art tools and methods for teaching reading and writing, for using performance assessments and learning progressions to accelerate progress, and for literacy-rich content-area instruction. Thousands of teachers regard the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project as a continual source of professional renewal and education.

You Can't Teach Understanding You Can’t Teach Understanding by Grant Wiggins, Ed.D, Authentic Education A cardinal principle in aiming at understanding is that understanding requires different pedagogy than acquisition of knowledge and skill. John Hattie's Eight Mind Frames For Teachers “Hattie’s 8 Mind frames”. Video scribe project by Cheryl Reynolds. In Visible Learning for Teachers (p. 159 ff) John Hattie claims that “the major argument in this book underlying powerful impacts in our schools relates to how we think! 5 Tools to Help Students Learn How to Learn Helping students learn how to learn: That’s what most educators strive for, and that’s the goal of inquiry learning. That skill transfers to other academic subject areas and even to the workplace where employers have consistently said that they want creative, innovative and adaptive thinkers. Inquiry learning is an integrated approach that includes kinds of learning: content, literacy, information literacy, learning how to learn, and social or collaborative skills. Students think about the choices they make throughout the process and the way they feel as they learn.

Heidi Hayes Jacobs on Curriculum 21: Resources, Key Points, Action Items, and Conversation Starters Posted by Jonathan Martin under Uncategorized Leave a Comment A bracing, challenging, informative talk from Heidi Hayes Jacob enlivened our afternoon. What year are we preparing our students for? I embedded below (after “more”) her Ted Talk; I hope you find these resources, suggested action items, and conversation starters and you reflect on her talk. Making Thinking Visible – Headlines Routine Project Zero, an educational research group at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, has been working to enhance student learning, thinking and creativity since the 1960s. Founded by the philosopher Nelson Goodman it’s impacted global education and been guided by such education luminaries as Howard Gardner and David Perkins. Utilizing it’s core concepts and adding a dash of Socrative will bolster student reflection, critical thinking, and creativity while developing independent learners for the 21st century. Let’s Dig In! What are Visible Thinking Routines? At the core of Visible Thinking are practices that help make thinking visible:Thinking Routines loosely guide learners’ thought processes and encourage active processing.

Tools for Teaching: Ditching The Deficit Model Photo credit: iStockPhoto Children are more than one test, once a year, in one sitting. It seems as if many schools and districts have lapsed into a deep state of amnesia of Maslow's hierarchy of needs -- a possible lingering hangover from NCLB. dr.jean If you can't find it here, try the Search Dr. Jean's Site button at the bottom of the page. Cheers Cheer Cards Link to video on YouTube- July, 2012 Link to video on TeacherTube - July 2012 Common Core & 21st Century Skills August, 2012 - Dancing with Standards-Intro to Reading, Part I September 2012 - Common Core-Writing, Speaking, Listening, Part II October 2012 - Common Core, Math - Part III January 2013 - 21st Century, Critical Thinking February, 2013 - Executive Function March, 2013 - Singing Standards July 2014 - I Can Common Core Centers August 2014 - I Can Common Core Centers, Part 2 October 2014 - Teamwork

Lesson Planning and Creating a Teacher Plan Book Lesson planning. Every teacher’s got to do it. Not only do we have to do it, but it’s important that we do it well. Well crafted lesson plans create a direction and a vision for your day. They help you feel less stressed and more confident. Applying The 40/40/40 Rule In Your Classroom I first encountered the “40/40/40 rule” years ago while skimming one of those giant (and indispensable) 400 page Understanding by Design tomes. The question was simple enough. Of all of the academic standards you are tasked with “covering” (more on this in a minute), what’s important that students understand for the next 40 days, what’s important that they understand for the next 40 months, and what’s important that they understand for the next 40 years?

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