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Presentation slides - John Hattie - Visible Learning, Tomorrow's Schools, and the Mindsets that make the difference in Education - Treasury Guest Lecture - September 2009

http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/media-speeches/guestlectures/pdfs/tgls-hattie.pdf

Related:  Visible Learning

Making Thinking Visible – Headlines Routine Project Zero, an educational research group at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, has been working to enhance student learning, thinking and creativity since the 1960s. Founded by the philosopher Nelson Goodman it’s impacted global education and been guided by such education luminaries as Howard Gardner and David Perkins. Utilizing it’s core concepts and adding a dash of Socrative will bolster student reflection, critical thinking, and creativity while developing independent learners for the 21st century. Let’s Dig In!

Using Data Tip #8: Triangulate, Triangulate, Triangulate GUEST BLOGGER: Mary Anne Mather, Using Data Senior Facilitator & Social Media Liaison on Twitter & FaceBook All too often state test results may be the only source consulted when targeting specific areas for improvement. However, decisions about instructional changes that reflect only this single data source, might lead to errors in your decision-making. If you want your data to lead you toward making meaningful changes, an important principle to follow, is triangulation.

John Hattie's 10 Myths about Student Achievement John Hattie’s 15 year meta-analysis of over ¼ of a billion students worldwide has enabled him to identify what really aids student achievement. In an interview with Sarah Montague for BBC Radio 4, he dispels some popular myths about what does and doesn’t matter in your school. Factors affecting student achievement – Hattie’s take: 1. Class Size – Reducing class size does enhance student achievement but only by a marginal amount. Our preoccupation with class size is an enigma; what’s really important is that the teacher learns to be an expert in their own class, no matter what size it is.

You Can't Teach Understanding You Can’t Teach Understanding by Grant Wiggins, Ed.D, Authentic Education A cardinal principle in aiming at understanding is that understanding requires different pedagogy than acquisition of knowledge and skill. Knowledge and skills are best developed by direct instruction and reinforcement if we want recall and fluency. Understanding, however, involves something beyond mere acquisition for later straightforward use. Hattie's Index Of Teaching & Learning Strategies: 39 Effect Sizes In Ascending Order An Index Of Teaching & Learning Strategies: 39 Effect Sizes In Ascending Order by Dana Schon, sai-iowa.org Effect Size Defined Statistically speaking, the strength of the relationship between two variables. John Hattie, Professor of Education and Director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia, says ‘effect sizes’ are the best way of answering the question ‘what has the greatest influence on student learning?’ Effect Size Applied

John Hattie admits that half of the Statistics in Visible Learning are wrong At the researchED conference in September 2013, Professor Robert Coe, Professor of Education at Durham University, said that John Hattie’s book, ‘Visible Learning’, is “riddled with errors”. But what are some of those errors? The biggest mistake Hattie makes is with the CLE statistic that he uses throughout the book. In ‘Visible Learning, Hattie only uses two statistics, the ‘Effect Size’ and the CLE (neither of which Mathematicians use).

Making learning Visible (John Hattie) Auckland University Professor John Hattie has recently authored a study, based on research into 83 million students, studying effective teachers around the world and has come up with some reassuring results for creative teachers. It's all about trusting relationships and 'oodles of feedback'. Note - it is not about national testing, our government's highly unoriginal plan. Click here for latest blogA link For more undated thinking about Hattie It seems hard to avoid the brief press releases of Auckland University Professor John Hattie's research in our newspapers. It is a shame that the papers haven't done more in depth research of their own into Hattie's findings.

Teachers switching format of parent conferences : suburban journals branding For the most part, parents and teachers want their student to be as successful as possible. Sometimes this is the only issue where the two factions agree. While the goal of success is clear to both parties, the road to this goal is slightly muddier. John Hattie The Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes Taxonomy (SOLO) is a notion that describes the stages of learning that students go through to reach a real depth of understanding on a topic. It outlines the journey from surface to deep learning. SOLO is John Hattie’s taxonomy of choice and is currently being studied in depth at his Visible Learning Labs (Osiris Educational Outstanding Teaching Conference, 2014). It is seen by Hattie and other academics as having many advantages over other taxonomies, in particular that of Benjamin Bloom. Quoted advantages over Bloom’s Taxonomy include: The SOLO Taxonomy emerged from in-classroom research whereas Bloom’s Taxonomy was theorised from a proposal by a committee of educatorsSOLO is a taxonomy about teaching and learning vs Bloom’s which is about knowledgeSOLO is based on progressively more challenging levels of cognitive complexity.

What works in education – Hattie’s list of the greatest effects and why it matters I have been a fan of John Hattie’s work ever since I encountered Visible Learning. Hattie has done the most exhaustive meta-analysis in education. Thanks to him, we can gauge not only the relative effectiveness of almost every educational intervention under the sun but we can compare these interventions on an absolute scale of effect size. Perhaps most importantly, Hattie was able to identify a ‘hinge point’ (as he calls it) from exhaustively comparing everything: the effect size of .40. Anything above such an effect size has more of an impact than just a typical year of academic experience and student growth. And an effect size of 1.0 or better is equivalent to advancing the student’s achievement level by approximately a full grade.

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