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Nine Elements

Nine Elements
Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Technology users need to be aware that not everyone has the same opportunities when it comes to technology. Working toward equal digital rights and supporting electronic access is the starting point of Digital Citizenship. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Respect, Educate and Protect (REPs) These elements have also been organized under the principles of respect, educate and protect. Respect Your Self/Respect Others - Etiquette - Access - Law Educate Your Self/Connect with Others - Literacy - Communication - Commerce Protect Your Self/Protect Others -Rights and Responsibility - Safety (Security) - Health and Welfare If this was to be taught beginning at the kindergarten level it would follow this pattern: Repetition 1 (kindergarten to second grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Etiquette

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Getting Sneaky About Digital Citizenship – DigCit Institute Article reposted with permission from nancywtech.com Dear Teachers, I met with a librarian friend of mine today to brainstorm ways to get digital citizenship embedded in lots of different areas of her school. Digital footprint One of the great things about being online is the ability to share videos and photos with your friends and seeing their response. Everything you post online combines to make your digital footprint. Remember that what you share with your friends may also be viewed by people you don’t know. And once it’s online, it could be there forever. So think before you post. You can manage your digital footprint by: Google must respect 'right to be forgotten' Internet companies can be made to remove irrelevant or excessive personal information from search engine results, Europe's top court ruled on Tuesday in a case pitting privacy campaigners against Google. The Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) upheld the complaint of a Spanish man who objected to the fact that Google searches on his name threw up links to a 1998 newspaper article about the repossession of his home. The case highlighted the struggle in cyberspace between free speech advocates and supporters of privacy rights who say people should have the "right to be forgotten" — meaning that they should be able to remove their digital traces from the internet. It creates both technical challenges and potential extra costs for companies like Google, the world's no.1 search engine, and Facebook. "We are very surprised that it differs so dramatically from the Advocate General's opinion and the warnings and consequences that he spelled out.

Home Published on 15 October 2012 Digital Citizenship is about displaying positive character traits in all online interactions. Mike Ribble, an expert on digital citizenship has broken the concept down into 9 important elements: Digital Access - making sure everyone has equitable access to technologyDigital Commerce - understanding the world of buying & selling onlineDigital Communication - we must make good decisions when faces with a world where we are connected almost 24/7Digital Literacy - we must teach our students to be comfortable with technology so they have the confidence to explore and tackle new technologies as they emergeDigital Etiquette - students must understand the norms assouciated with online conduct and interactionsDigital Law - we are legally reponsible for our actions online just as we are offline. (Information take from: Nine Themes in Digital Citizenship.

Minecraft and Immersive Learning Environments for School Librarians Valerie Hill, MLS, PhD, is a teacher librarian, adjunct instructor of library science, and information literacy consultant. Dr. Hill received her MLS in Library and Information Science from Texas Woman’s University in 2007 and a PhD in Library and Information Science in 2012. She served as a school librarian for twenty years, taught children’s literature and library science at the graduate level, and taught information literacy at all grade levels. She is currently an information literacy consultant with a research focus on the intersection of information literacy and libraries with virtual worlds and digital culture. Digital Bytes Digital Bytes teaches teens digital citizenship through student-directed, media-rich activities that tackle real-world dilemmas. Teens learn from the experiences of their peers then create collaborative projects that voice their ideas for making smart, safe choices online. Digital Bytes is ideal for afterschool programs, community centers, or blended-learning classrooms that need short, relevant activities that teach digital citizenship and critical thinking about media consumption and creation. Here's what teens have to say about Digital Bytes: "I learned that not everything should be posted online.

Digital Citizenship Graphic Digital citizenship is " the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use."It is the combination of technical and social skills that enable a person to be successful and safe in the information age. Just like literacy and numeracy initiatives which provide people with the skills to ' participate in the work force, digital literacy has become an essential skill to be a confident, connected, and actively involved life long learner.' I personally recommend that teachers and educators should, throughout the entire school year, devote special sessions to just teaching students about Digital Citizenship.

Trillion-Dollar Footprint (6-8) Warm-up (10 minutes) ASK:How many of you have … sent a message or posted a comment online?created a profile on a social network site? Understanding Digital Citizenship (Note: There is some sensitive content discussed here, especially under item #4.) I recently spent most of the day with Dean Shareski in Moose Jaw co-facilitating a couple of digital citizenship sessions. Here’s the wiki for the media literacy portion, in case you are interested.

What are literacy skills? Literacy skills help students gain knowledge through reading as well as using media and technology. These skills also help students create knowledge through writing as well as developing media and technology. Information Literacy Students need to be able to work effectively with information, using it at all levels of Bloom's Taxonomy (remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating). Information literacy involves traditional skills such as reading, researching, and writing; but new ways to read and write have also introduced new skills: A Treasure Trove of Digital Citizenship Resources for Teachers Via Educational Technology and Mobile Learning There is a special section here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning where I have aggregated a plethora of resources that teachers can use with their students to teach them about digital citizenship. And today I come across these wonderful resources compiled by Taryn Degnan from Common Sense Media. I thought about tweeting the link without having to share it here but I know thousands of email and RSS Feed subscribers would miss it. Below is a round-up of all the links Taryn featured in her post.

Online Reputation Infographic You don't have to be running for president to care about your online reputation. Almost everything you do online is easy to track, especially when you're using social media sites. This infographic shows you how to manage your "e-reputation," perhaps saving you some embarrassment, or even your career. Gathered by digital marketing firm KBSD, it's a treasure trove of tips, techniques and information about what companies and individuals are looking for inside your personal profiles and social information, and what you can do to show off your best side to those who might want to find out unflattering things about you.

What Students Will Learn In The Future What Students Will Learn In The Future by Terry Heick This is part 1 of the series “Responsive Teaching For A Changing World,” a 3-part series is sponsored by Adobe Presenter 9. They had nothing to do with the content–only asked that we include a link back to their platform, which you can see above. A lot is implied in the content areas we choose to disperse the world through. That’s essentially what classes and content areas are–perspectives to make sense of the world.

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