background preloader

Online Reputation Infographic

Online Reputation Infographic
You don't have to be running for president to care about your online reputation. Almost everything you do online is easy to track, especially when you're using social media sites. This infographic shows you how to manage your "e-reputation," perhaps saving you some embarrassment, or even your career. Gathered by digital marketing firm KBSD, it's a treasure trove of tips, techniques and information about what companies and individuals are looking for inside your personal profiles and social information, and what you can do to show off your best side to those who might want to find out unflattering things about you. It's not too late to protect yourself and polish up your online image. So now that you've grown up (you have grown up, haven't you?) Infographic courtesy KBSD, photo courtesy iStockphoto/Yuri Arcurs

http://mashable.com/2011/11/02/protecting-your-online-reputation/

Related:  Digital Citizenshiporganisations et leadership

Five-Minute Films "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen. It's an overwhelming array of skills to be taught and topics to explore.

End the Office? Students Want Right to Work From Home [INFOGRAPHIC] Planning on hiring a hotshot kid straight out of college? Here's a checklist for you: Make sure she can tweet or update Facebook while on the clock. Let her get work email on whatever device she wants. Allow her to work from home on her own schedule, even though she's unlikely to really think it makes her more productive. Marsali Hancock: Digital Citizenship for Today's Teens HuffPost High School and iKeepCurrent will explore digital citizenship: what it means to be an ethical, responsible and resilient digital citizen. Our partnership will provide a unique opportunity to include the youth voice often left silent in the online safety, security and ethics discussion. This is what we know: the way students interact with each other online profoundly affects how they perceive themselves and engage with others offline. The reality is that our young people meet and bond emotionally through their digital devices.

How Recruiters Use Social Networks to Screen Candidates Over the past few years, we've seen social media used in the job market in a number of ways — startups, small businesses and large corporations alike are diving into the socialverse to find top talent, and job seekers are likewise getting creative with social media. Social media monitoring service Reppler recently surveyed more than 300 hiring professionals to determine when and how job recruiters are screening job candidates on different social networks. The study found that more than 90% of recruiters and hiring managers have visited a potential candidate's profile on a social network as part of the screening process. And a whopping 69% of recruiters have rejected a candidate based on content found on his or her social networking profiles — an almost equal proportion of recruiters (68%), though, have hired a candidate based on his or her presence on those networks. Every week we post a list of social media and web job opportunities. Infographic courtesy of Reppler

Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Technology users need to be aware that not everyone has the same opportunities when it comes to technology. Malthusian Theory of Population Thomas Robert Malthus was the first economist to propose a systematic theory of population. He articulated his views regarding population in his famous book, Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), for which he collected empirical data to support his thesis. Malthus had the second edition of his book published in 1803, in which he modified some of his views from the first edition, but essentially his original thesis did not change. In Essay on the Principle of Population,Malthus proposes the principle that human populations grow exponentially (i.e., doubling with each cycle) while food production grows at an arithmetic rate (i.e. by the repeated addition of a uniform increment in each uniform interval of time).

The Perks of Working at Google, Facebook, Twitter and More [INFOGRAPHIC] Are you a techie looking for work? We recently offered some tips on landing jobs at Google, Apple and Facebook, but there are more companies in the Valley than those three. And you might be wondering what the culture is like at each of these companies, as well as at LinkedIn, Twitter, Eventbrite, Gaia and Tagged. Back in August, we brought you word of awesome perks at various startups; now, we bring you perks at a number of Silicon Valley's largest and finest. From yoga to catered lunches, 401(k)s to dry cleaning, sports teams to vacation days, these tech companies seem to understand that quality of life affects productivity — and that having to run fewer errands after work means you're more likely to stay at the office.

Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens How Cellphones Shape the Lives of College Students [INFOGRAPHIC] The majority of college students today use smartphones — although three-quarters don't foot their own bills. Not surprisingly, this has changed the classroom dynamic. Some 88% text during class; 40% use their phones for last-minute test prep; and a quarter take their devices out during each class. This infographic, created by HackCollege, delves into the intricacies of how college students in the U.S. use their mobile devices.

Digital footprint One of the great things about being online is the ability to share videos and photos with your friends and seeing their response. Everything you post online combines to make your digital footprint. Remember that what you share with your friends may also be viewed by people you don’t know. And once it’s online, it could be there forever. So think before you post.

Related: