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Digital Dossier

Digital Dossier
Related:  Online LivesDigital Citizenship

What are you revealing online? Much more than you think What can be guessed about you from your online behavior? Two computer privacy experts — economist Alessandro Acquisti and computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck — on how little we know about how much others know. The best indicator of high intelligence on Facebook is apparently liking a page for curly fries. I hear so much conflicting information about what I should and shouldn’t be posting online. Alessandro Acquisti: My personal view is that individual responsibility is important, but we are at a stage where it is not sufficient. Jennifer Golbeck: I agree with that. Take language analysis, a really powerful tool where we look at the kinds of words that you use — not even necessarily obvious things like curse words, but things like function words: how often you use “I” versus “we,” how often you use “the” versus “a,” these little words that are natural in the way that you develop language and inherent to your personality. What would a policy solution look like? AA: Indeed.

Online Reputation Infographic You don't have to be running for president to care about your online reputation. Almost everything you do online is easy to track, especially when you're using social media sites. This infographic shows you how to manage your "e-reputation," perhaps saving you some embarrassment, or even your career. Gathered by digital marketing firm KBSD, it's a treasure trove of tips, techniques and information about what companies and individuals are looking for inside your personal profiles and social information, and what you can do to show off your best side to those who might want to find out unflattering things about you. It's not too late to protect yourself and polish up your online image. So now that you've grown up (you have grown up, haven't you?) Infographic courtesy KBSD, photo courtesy iStockphoto/Yuri Arcurs

"Manners Matter" Digital Citizenship Tips [Infographic] Enjoy this useful infographic produced by Knowthenet called Manners Matter. And they do, especially when it comes to teaching students proper digital citizenship skills. Resources such as this are a terrific way to share what’s important about technology with today’s digital learners! Knowthenet is a digital citizenship organization that helps individuals, families and businesses get the most out of the Internet. Knowthenet presents Manners Matter the online Netiquette Do’s and Don’ts infographic.

THINK Poster The acronyms teens really use on social media The reason for the apology stems from a story I wrote last year, "28 Internet acronyms every parent should know." "Wouldn't it be interesting to do a piece on the acronyms that teens are using across the Internet, especially on social media and apps, to help parents understand what, in fact, their kids are talking about?" I thought. I consulted existing lists of Internet acronyms and talked with Internet safety experts. My Twitter feed blew up with people saying I didn't know what I was talking about and that teens weren't using most of the acronyms on my list. Here's why I'm sorry: For that story, I never consulted with the true experts -- teens, themselves. Related: Do teens still use Facebook? I'm thankful to have a chance for a re-do, and this time I know we'll get it right because our list comes straight from the social media posts of 13-year-olds around the country. The end result: 150,000 posts written by 13-year-olds. Related: Teens on social media: Being cut off is 'awful' 1. 2. 3.

THINK Poster #Being13: Teens and social media "When I get my phone taken away, I feel kind of naked," said Kyla, another 13-year-old. "I do feel kind of empty without my phone." More than 200 eighth graders from across the country allowed their social media feeds to be studied by child development experts who partnered with CNN. "I think they're addicted to the peer connection and affirmation they're able to get via social media," said child clinical psychologist Marion Underwood, the study's co-author. Sociologist Robert Faris, a school bullying and youth aggression researcher and the other author of the study, said, "There's a lot of anxiety about what's going on online, when they're not actually online, so that leads to compulsive checking." Why are teens so anxious about what's happening online? "This is an age group that has a lot of anxiety about how they fit in, what they rank, what their peer-status is. The study was conducted with eighth graders at eight different schools in six states across the country. "Go die.

Five-Minute Films "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen. But while there is much talk about the importance of teaching digital citizenship in this information society, not many are sure what that really looks like. Video Playlist: Teaching Digital Citizenship Watch the player below to see the whole playlist, or view it on YouTube. What is Digital Citizenship? More Resources for Learning About Digital Citizenship

Digital Natives, Yet Strangers to the Web When Reuben Loewy took up his first teaching gig in 2012, he had a major revelation: The digital revolution has dramatically transformed the way that kids perceive reality. Perhaps that makes the 55-year-old teacher sound like a dinosaur. What he discovered is, after all, one of the most obvious realities shaping education policy and parenting guides today. But, as Loewy will clarify, his revelation wasn’t simply that technology is overhauling America’s classrooms and redefining childhood and adolescence. Rather, he was hit with the epiphany that efforts in schools to embrace these shifts are, by and large, focusing on the wrong objectives: equipping kids with fancy gadgets and then making sure the students use those gadgets appropriately and effectively. Educational institutions across the board are certainly embracing (or at least acknowledging) the digital revolution, adopting cutting-edge classroom technology and raising awareness about the perils and possibilities of the Internet.

Junior Poster Master Your Online Presence with Alex Katzen (CLAS '12) - U.Va. Alumni, Parents & Friends Imagine if your future employers could see everything that you bring to the table. Okay, maybe not everything (thank you college), but all of the positive, constructive things you do on a daily basis; all of the news articles you read, the contacts you have, and any random interests. A resume is great and all, but for millennials, we need to showcase our talents in a whole new way. Creating a presence online brings you so many opportunities. I often see my friends posting and debating interesting articles on Facebook. If you like reading about mobile apps, show it off. Social media is powerful. Create profiles on sites like About.me, Quora, and Google+. Certain websites rank higher than others. Okay, so I know a lot of people using Twitter and other social media sites don’t exactly want to advertise their posts to the whole world. Utilize your social media accounts to improve your online reputation. Why not start with a blog? What do you want to showcase about yourself on Google?

Sharing Photo Poster Today’s children will feature in almost 1,000 online photos by the time they reach age five | Knowthenet Oxford, UK, 26 May 2015: This is the key finding of new research commissioned by Nominet for its online safety campaign knowthenet. The figure rises as children get older, with parents of those under the age of 16 sharing on average 208 images of their children online a year. The study revealed that 17% of parents have never checked their Facebook privacy settings and almost half (46%) have only checked once or twice, despite the social network being the most common platform for photo sharing. The research, conducted by the Parent Zone on behalf of Nominet’s advice site knowthenet.org.uk, polled 2,000 parents on the ways in which they share images of children online, as well as testing them on their knowledge of the information that is captured when taking pictures on different devices. Despite 70% of parents claiming their main gadget for taking photos was a smartphone, fewer than half (49%) were aware that location data showing where photos were taken could be stored. Notes to editors

Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Respect, Educate and Protect (REPs) These elements have also been organized under the principles of respect, educate and protect. Respect Your Self/Respect Others - Etiquette - Access - Law Educate Your Self/Connect with Others - Literacy - Communication - Commerce Protect Your Self/Protect Others -Rights and Responsibility - Safety (Security) - Health and Welfare If this was to be taught beginning at the kindergarten level it would follow this pattern: Repetition 1 (kindergarten to second grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Etiquette Educate Your Self/Connect with OthersDigital Literacy Protect Your Self/Protect Others Digital Rights and Responsibility Repetition 2 (third to fifth grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Access

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