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Digital Dossier

Digital Dossier

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79IYZVYIVLA

Related:  Online LivesDigital Citizenship

What are you revealing online? Much more than you think What can be guessed about you from your online behavior? Two computer privacy experts — economist Alessandro Acquisti and computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck — on how little we know about how much others know. The best indicator of high intelligence on Facebook is apparently liking a page for curly fries.

Online Reputation Infographic You don't have to be running for president to care about your online reputation. Almost everything you do online is easy to track, especially when you're using social media sites. This infographic shows you how to manage your "e-reputation," perhaps saving you some embarrassment, or even your career. Gathered by digital marketing firm KBSD, it's a treasure trove of tips, techniques and information about what companies and individuals are looking for inside your personal profiles and social information, and what you can do to show off your best side to those who might want to find out unflattering things about you. It's not too late to protect yourself and polish up your online image. So now that you've grown up (you have grown up, haven't you?)

Safer Internet Don't reply to messages that are meant to harass or upset you. This is likely to encourage the bully Keep the message: you don't have to read it, but keep it as proof of harassment. It is vital to have a record of the incident when you look for help or want to report it. Report problems to people who can do something about it. "Manners Matter" Digital Citizenship Tips [Infographic] Enjoy this useful infographic produced by Knowthenet called Manners Matter. And they do, especially when it comes to teaching students proper digital citizenship skills. Resources such as this are a terrific way to share what’s important about technology with today’s digital learners! Knowthenet is a digital citizenship organization that helps individuals, families and businesses get the most out of the Internet.

Five-Minute Films "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen.

The acronyms teens really use on social media The reason for the apology stems from a story I wrote last year, "28 Internet acronyms every parent should know." "Wouldn't it be interesting to do a piece on the acronyms that teens are using across the Internet, especially on social media and apps, to help parents understand what, in fact, their kids are talking about?" I thought. I consulted existing lists of Internet acronyms and talked with Internet safety experts. Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. #Being13: Teens and social media "When I get my phone taken away, I feel kind of naked," said Kyla, another 13-year-old. "I do feel kind of empty without my phone." More than 200 eighth graders from across the country allowed their social media feeds to be studied by child development experts who partnered with CNN.

Digital footprint One of the great things about being online is the ability to share videos and photos with your friends and seeing their response. Everything you post online combines to make your digital footprint. Remember that what you share with your friends may also be viewed by people you don’t know. And once it’s online, it could be there forever. Digital Natives, Yet Strangers to the Web When Reuben Loewy took up his first teaching gig in 2012, he had a major revelation: The digital revolution has dramatically transformed the way that kids perceive reality. Perhaps that makes the 55-year-old teacher sound like a dinosaur. What he discovered is, after all, one of the most obvious realities shaping education policy and parenting guides today. But, as Loewy will clarify, his revelation wasn’t simply that technology is overhauling America’s classrooms and redefining childhood and adolescence. Rather, he was hit with the epiphany that efforts in schools to embrace these shifts are, by and large, focusing on the wrong objectives: equipping kids with fancy gadgets and then making sure the students use those gadgets appropriately and effectively.

Digital Citizenship Graphic Digital citizenship is " the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use."It is the combination of technical and social skills that enable a person to be successful and safe in the information age. Just like literacy and numeracy initiatives which provide people with the skills to ' participate in the work force, digital literacy has become an essential skill to be a confident, connected, and actively involved life long learner.' I personally recommend that teachers and educators should, throughout the entire school year, devote special sessions to just teaching students about Digital Citizenship. Students need to learn how to act appropriately while using the net and there are several activities and resources to help you do that with them. Check out this section to access some of these resources.

Master Your Online Presence with Alex Katzen (CLAS '12) - U.Va. Alumni, Parents & Friends Imagine if your future employers could see everything that you bring to the table. Okay, maybe not everything (thank you college), but all of the positive, constructive things you do on a daily basis; all of the news articles you read, the contacts you have, and any random interests. A resume is great and all, but for millennials, we need to showcase our talents in a whole new way.

Cyber Safety Tips Thanks to our friends at Family Lives in the UK, they have provided us with this great Cyber Safety Tips Fact Sheet! I hope you find this information helpful! You can learn more about Family Lives by visiting them online here. Cyber Safety Tips Facts Today’s children will feature in almost 1,000 online photos by the time they reach age five Oxford, UK, 26 May 2015: This is the key finding of new research commissioned by Nominet for its online safety campaign knowthenet. The figure rises as children get older, with parents of those under the age of 16 sharing on average 208 images of their children online a year. The study revealed that 17% of parents have never checked their Facebook privacy settings and almost half (46%) have only checked once or twice, despite the social network being the most common platform for photo sharing. The research, conducted by the Parent Zone on behalf of Nominet’s advice site knowthenet.org.uk, polled 2,000 parents on the ways in which they share images of children online, as well as testing them on their knowledge of the information that is captured when taking pictures on different devices. Despite 70% of parents claiming their main gadget for taking photos was a smartphone, fewer than half (49%) were aware that location data showing where photos were taken could be stored. Notes to editors

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