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Digital Citizen AUA

Digital Citizen AUA
Acceptable Use Agreement Introduction As a frequent presenter and speaker on digital citizenship, I feel it is critical to presented a balanced and considered perspective. Its easy, particularly when presented with a captive audience, to place undue emphasis on the darker side of out digital lives. The media abounds with horror stories and tragedies, of mis-adventure and mis-direction, crime and punishment, but this is what sells papers and magazines and attracts readers/viewers. Seldom do you see the predominant reality of our digital world, people getting on with their day to day activities, be these business or leisure. Senior School AUA This Acceptable Use Agreement has six conditions or facets of being a Digital Citizen. Middle School AUA This is a Digital Citizenship agreement for Middle School Students. 1. 2. 3. By not stealing other people's property. Junior School Guidelines This is a simplified version to suit the younger audience. Looking after others. Looking after stuff.

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Content Directories - Creative Commons Welcome to the Content Directories The following is a list of organizations and projects powered with Creative Commons licenses. Since Creative Commons does not maintain a database of content and does not store content, we would like CC-community members to help build a directory of projects to help spread the word about CC — hence the CC Content Directories wiki! Please help us fill it out! Social Media Privacy Terms Translated into Plain English, Finally We fully expect our kids and our students to adhere to social media privacy terms with due diligence. Part of this is reading the terms and conditions portion of any network they sign up for. But when those conditions are presented as dozens of pages of jargon written at a post-graduate reading level, students lose interest quickly. For that matter, so do adults. When was the last time you spent time absorbing a full set of privacy terms and conditions and understood everything that was being stated, honestly?

Australian Privacy Foundation - Privacy Laws of the World This document is a partner to pages on International Instruments, on Privacy Laws of the Commonwealth of Australia and on Privacy Laws of the States and Territories of Australia Contents Introduction Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education - Center for Media and Social Impact Coordinated by: The Media Education Lab, Temple University The Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, American University Washington College of Law The Center for Media & Social Impact, American University Lesson Plans – Search Education – Google Picking the right search terms Beginner Pick the best words to use in academic searching, whether students are beginning with a full question or a topic of just a few words. View lesson

Jenny Luca - Toorak College Information Fluency Program Toorak College Information Fluency ProgramCC BY-NC-SAAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlikeAt Toorak College the teaching and learning of information fluency skills is embedded in the dissemination of an integrated curriculum. The Information Fluency Program recognises the importance of preparing and skilling students to be active, productive and collaborative contributors in an increasingly global society. The Program is based on the standards developed by the International Society for Technology in Education(ISTE®) and compatible with the General Capabilities identified by ACARA (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority) in the Australian Curriculum. It outlines, at each year level, relevant skills, learning tasks and applications that reflect 21st century learning and living.

mashable Rebecca Levey is a co-founder of KidzVuz.com, a video review site by and for tweens. She writes about technology and education at Beccarama and is a White House Champion of Change for Education. Follow her at @beccasara. On the face of it, my 10-year-old twin daughters are the poster girls for the "digital natives" generation. They've had a Leapster since age 4, and have been online since they were 5 — first playing on Webkinz, then Club Penguin, Moshi Monsters, and other online virtual worlds.

P21's Framework for 21st Century Learning was developed with input from teachers, education experts, and business leaders to define and illustrate the skills and knowledge students need to succeed in work, life and citizenship, as well as the support systems necessary for 21st century learning outcomes. It has been used by thousands of educators and hundreds of schools in the U.S. and abroad to put 21st century skills at the center of learning. The P21 Framework represents both 21st century student outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom). Tweet the Framework While the graphic represents each element distinctly for descriptive purposes, P21 views all the components as fully interconnected in the process of 21st century teaching and learning. 21st Century Student Outcomes

Our Space: Being a Responsible Citizen of the Digital World For most young people today, engagement with new digital media is a routine aspect of life. Through computers, mobile phones, and other handheld devices, youth can blog, tweet, participate in social networks like Facebook, play massive multi-player games, use online information sources, and share videos, stories, music, and art they’ve created. Important skills and knowledge can be gained from such activities, but there are also risks.

getpocket In one focus group I held recently with seventh-grade girls in an affluent suburb, all of the girls were avid Instagram and Snapchat users. It was clear that they understood the dynamics of presenting a persona through the images they posted. It was also clear that they had a definite set of rules about pictures. Aware of their privileged socioeconomic status, they talked about how it would not be O.K. to share vacation pictures of a fancy hotel, using the example of a classmate who had violated this rule. How common is sexting amongst teenagers? This is what they have to say. - Internet Safe Education By definition, sexting is the distribution of a sexually explicit image or video of oneself to another user, or receipt of the same, via information communication technology. Basically, sending a nude picture of yourself to someone else over the internet. Either through our own imagination, the media or what we hear from others, we form an opinion as to how prevalent this practice is amongst our youth. As a father of teenagers, it’s a real concern as to how sexting would affect our family should my children became involved. These concerns take new heights when I hear a teenager say, “everybody does it, it’s just what you do these days.” Is it really?

Resources for school leaders and educators - Netsafe: Supporting New Zealand internet users Online support. Toolbox with tools on laptop. 3d There has never been a greater need for schools to take a proactive approach towards whole school community promotion of digital citizenship, including online safety and wellbeing, than there is now. The internet affords new ways of working and learning, and in turn, new challenges are emerging and evolving for young people and those who support them. Online safety and digital citizenship skills are not developed in isolation, and need to be integrated into schools’ strategic planning and deliberately planned for across the school. The following resources may be useful when developing a proactive, strategic approach to digital citizenship and online safety for your whole school.

10 Awesome Places to Find Background Music for Video Video content has exploded in popularity, and it’s no wonder. Consumers find video engaging, compelling and convincing — so much so that they’re anywhere from 64% to 85% more likely to buy after watching a product video. In fact, video on a landing page can boost conversions by an astonishing 80%. Already, companies that use video on their website get 41% more traffic from search results than those that don’t, and by next year, you can expect 74% of all web traffic to be video. Sure, every smartphone worth its salt has a decent video camera, but the highly competitive content arena today demands top quality content in all formats — including video.

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