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CyberBee
Related:  Digital Citizenship

How to Determine Website Credibility [Rubric] Our World Wide Web is a living, breathing, and constantly expanding phenomenon. We often wonder how much information is being produced, and infographics like this one from Domo can give us a fairly solid visual idea of what’s being created and uploaded regularly. Personally, we think Mitchell Kapor said it more eloquently than anyone: “Getting information off the Internet is like taking a drink from a fire hydrant.” This rapid exponential growth of information across the Web makes it all the more difficult to assess the credibility of our sources. As teachers of critical thinking skills, it’s important for us to provide guidelines for students to use when searching for content to use in their projects. Whether for citations or research, our students need a strong grasp of Information Fluency for use in determining website credibility. You can view their evaluation presentation here. Get the latest acticles straight to your inbox.

15 Apps and Websites Kids Are Heading to After Facebook Gone are the days of Facebook as a one-stop shop for all social-networking needs. Recent reports go back and forth on teens' favorite digital hangout, but the fact is that these days, teens are diversifying: dividing their attention among an array of apps and sites that let them write, share, chat, and meet new friends. It may seem more complicated to share photos on Instagram, post secrets on Whisper, flirt with people on Skout, and share jokes on Twitter, but tweens and teens seem to enjoy keeping up with their various virtual outposts, and each one offers something different. (And they're doing lots of positive things on social media!) You don't need to know the ins and outs of all the apps and sites that are "hot" right now (and frankly, if you did, they wouldn't be trendy anymore). Below, we've laid out some of the most popular types of apps and websites for teens: texting, micro-blogging, self-destructing/secret, and chatting/meeting/dating. Texting apps Kik MessengerooVooWhatsApp

New Report: Children Becoming More Trusting of What They See Online Overview and link to a new report from the Ofcom (communications regulator in UK). Nothing that we really haven’t heard this before but important to hear (and share) again. More ammo for why about why digital literacy is essential and begin as early as possible. From Ofcom: Children are becoming more trusting of what they see online, but sometimes lack the understanding to decide whether it is true or impartial.Ofcom’s published today, reveals that children aged 8-15 are spending more than twice as much time online as they did a decade ago, reaching over 15 hours each week in 2015.But even for children who have grown up with the internet – so-called digital natives – there’s room to improve their digital know-how and understanding.For example, children do not always question what they find online. Resources Direct to Full Text Report (228 pages; PDF) Also embedded below. Direct to Report by Chapter and Two Data Files (.csv) Craft Exceptional Digital Experiences for Your Users

Digital Literacy & Citizenship Classroom Curriculum NEW! Learn the fundamentals of digital citizenship through choose-your-own-adventure interactive experiences DIGITAL COMPASS - Where are you headed? The only educational game that gives kids the freedom to explore how decisions made in their digital lives can impact their relationships and future. Bring a blended-learning approach to teaching digital citizenship DIGITAL BYTES teaches teens digital citizenship through student-directed, media-rich activities that tackle real-world dilemmas. Teens learn from peers' experiences then create collaborative projects that voice their ideas for making smart choices online. Measure Student Learning with Interactive Assessments We offer THREE WAYS to assess student learning about digital literacy and citizenship. Decorate with Digital Citizenship Classroom Posters Download our colorful POSTERS to remind your students about digital citizenship and device care and maintenance.

How Important Are Students' Digital Footprints? | Edutopia Melissa Davis , Melissa Davis, CEO & Co-Founder of GoEnnounce.com Posted 09/22/2014 8:06AM | Last Commented 09/30/2014 6:34AM In an age where everything can be “Googled” and online privacy no longer exists, students have a whole new reputation at stake—their digital reputation, or their digital footprint. A digital footprintis any online information about a person that can be searched, shared, and seen by a large, invisible audience. According to Educator’s Technology, “Managing one’s digital identity is a skill, so to speak, that we need to learn and teach our kids and students about. Students may not understand the implications of what is shared via social media, and parents and teachers need to be cognizant and start teaching students about the effects and how to manage their own digital footprints. So how serious is this, really? Here are five steps to get started. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What Your Students Really Need to Know About Digital Citizenship In my classroom, I use two essential approaches in the digital citizenship curriculum that I teach: proactive knowledge and experiential knowledge. Proactive Knowledge I want my students to know the “9 Key Ps” of digital citizenship. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Experiential Knowledge During the year, I touch on each of the points above with lessons and class discussions, but just talking is not enough. Truth or fiction: To protect us from disease, we are inoculated with dead viruses and germs. Turn students into teachers: You can have students create tutorials or presentations exposing common scams and how people can protect themselves. Collaborative learning communities: For the most powerful learning experiences, students should participate in collaborative learning (like the experiences shared in Flattening Classrooms, Engaging Minds). Students need experience sharing and connecting online with others in a variety of environments. Digital Citizenship or Just Citizens?

Location Based Safety Guide Privacy is a freedom we give ourselves. It is spring break. Facebook is full of my friends saying where they are (with their whole families), and it looks like most of them are posting publicly. Someone could easily look at the Camilla, Georgia and publicly see who is out of town. Location Based Girl-Finding App Uses FourSquare and Facebook Girls Around Me, the app that used Foursquare and Facebook location data to reveal the whereabouts of girls located around a person, had people upset. “Girls Around Me does not provide any data that is unavailable to the user when he uses his or her social network account, nor does it reveal any data that users did not share with others.” Is Sharing Your Location a Big Deal? The fact is that girls and adults ARE sharing this information. “We’re so happy to be gone to the beach for a week” along with the location -or-“The mountains are so pretty! I cringe when I see these are PUBLIC updates on Facebook that anyone can see. Tip #9: Educate Further Reading:

Online Safety Lesson Plans for Teachers | Kids.gov FBI Cyber Surf Islands Teacher's Guide - The Cyber Surf Islands activity features 3rd- 8th grade-specific “islands” teaching about various aspects of internet safety through games, videos, and other interactive features. This guide helps use the site and create a leaderboard. (PDF)Safe Surfing Kids - Find lesson plans and activities for teaching online safety to students in the 3rd through 12th grades. NetSmartz - Teaching Materials - Find free teaching materials, handouts, videos, and activities for your students.Stay Safe Online - The National CybersecurityAlliance offers activities and materials to help you teach cybersecurity and cyberetehics, to students from kindergarten through 12th grade. A reminder that your Instagram photos aren’t really yours: Someone else can sell them for $90,000 Richard Prince’s Instagram screenshots at Frieze Art Fair in New York. (Marco Scozzaro/Frieze) The Internet is the place where nothing goes to die. Those embarrassing photos of your high school dance you marked “private” on Facebook? We agree, and are adding this caveat: Don’t post anything you wouldn’t want hanging in an art gallery. This month, painter and photographer Richard Prince reminded us that what you post is public, and given the flexibility of copyright laws, can be shared — and sold — for anyone to see. The collection, “New Portraits,” is primarily made up of pictures of women, many in sexually charged poses. How is this okay? First you should know that Richard Prince has been “re-photographing” since the 1970s. In other words, Prince could make slight adjustments to the photos and call them his own. Prince’s 1977 work “Untitled (four single men with interchangeable backgrounds looking to the right),” which is made of photos that previously appeared in print. lifestyle true

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