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United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

http://www.ushmm.org/

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Teaching 9/11 Page 1 / 20 1. Interactive Timeline of the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks 2. 102 Minutes 3. Evacuation of Lower Manhattan 4. 20 percent projects: 10 must-have tools Students engaging in 20 percent projects must gather and curate information, share it and present it. Here are 10 tools to help. Every good handyman (or handywoman) knows that having the right tool can save minutes — or hours — of work. Academic work is no exception. Students who engage in 20 percent projects — where 20 percent of class time is devoted to a project the student is passionate about — engage in certain activities to prepare for the culminating event: often a presentation in front of their peers. There’s content gathering and content curation to be done. 1945: US drops atomic bomb on Hiroshima 1945: US drops atomic bomb on Hiroshima The first atomic bomb has been dropped by a United States aircraft on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. President Harry S Truman, announcing the news from the cruiser, USS Augusta, in the mid-Atlantic, said the device was more than 2,000 times more powerful than the largest bomb used to date. An accurate assessment of the damage caused has so far been impossible due to a huge cloud of impenetrable dust covering the target. Hiroshima is one of the chief supply depots for the Japanese army. The bomb was dropped from an American B-29 Superfortress, known as Enola Gay, at 0815 local time.

Making the History of 1989 The Fall of Communism in Eastern Europe IntroductoryEssay Sets the scene for the events of 1989 and explains their significance in world history. PrimarySources Over 300 primary sources, including government documents, images, videos, and artifacts with introductory notes. ScholarInterviews Four scholars focus on the history & events surrounding 1989 through primary sources. TeachingModules Modules provide historical context, strategies, and resources for teaching the history of 1989 with primary sources.

German Propaganda Archive (Guide Page) Nazi and East German Propaganda Guide Page Propaganda was central to Nazi Germany and the German Democratic Republic. The German Propaganda Archive includes both propaganda itself and material produced for the guidance of propagandists. The goal is to help people understand the two great totalitarian systems of the twentieth century by giving them access to the primary material. For further information on the site, see the FAQ. New items are described in the GPA Blog. What’s New in Evernote Web Clipper Capture articles to read later The Evernote Web Clipper will automatically detect the article on a page and create a beautiful rendering of it inside your Evernote account. You can expand or shrink the selection using the grab bars. Clip simplified articles Enjoy a better reading experience on your favorite blogs and news sources.

1945: Atom bomb hits Nagasaki 1945: Atom bomb hits Nagasaki American forces have dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki - the second such attack on Japan in three days. The bomb was dropped by parachute from an American B29 Bomber at 1102 local time. It exploded about 1,625 ft (500m) above the ground and is believed to have completely destroyed the city, which is situated on the western side of the Japanese island of Kyushu. Making of America aking of America (MoA) is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology. The collection currently contains approximately 10,000 books and 50,000 journal articles with 19th century imprints. For more details about the project, see About MoA. Making of America is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Research Behind Choice and Inquiry-Based Education Since experimenting with “20% Time” in my class a few years ago, I’ve been fascinated by the research and history of this practice in education and the business world. This has led me down a long road to finally writing Inquiry & Innovation in the Classroom (published by Routledge) on inquiry-driven education and choice-based learning experiences. During that time I’ve had hundreds of conversations with fellow teachers practicing choice-based and inquiry-driven learning in some way shape or form (Genius Hour, Passion Projects, Choose2Matter etc). Lately, through the book-writing process I’ve had some more in-depth interviews about inquiry-based education, and I’ve spent a great deal of time researching the beginnings and reasons behind 20% time’s effectiveness. Today I want to shed some light on the research behind choice, and more broadly, inquiry-driven education.

Why did World War II Start? - Children's British History Encyclopedia Since 1933, Germany had been ruled by Adolf Hitler and his political party, the Nazis. They wanted to take revenge for Germany’s defeat in the Great War by expanding Germany’s empire. In 1938, the Nazis invaded Austria and on 15th March 1939 they invaded Czechoslovakia. Next, on 1st September 1939, over a million Nazi troops then invaded Poland. Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution, With 12 Topical Essays, 250 Images, 350 Text Documents, 13 Songs, 13 Maps, a Timeline, and a Glossary. Explore Browse

The Economic Consequences of the Peace : John Maynard Keynes LibriVox recording of The Economic Consequences of the Peace by John Maynard Keynes. Read by Graham McMillan. The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1919) was a best seller throughout the world, published by John Maynard Keynes. Keynes attended the Versailles Conference as a delegate of the British Treasury and argued for a much more generous peace with Germany. These 20 Photographs Will Leave You Speechless. Especially The 11th One. There Are No Words. Take a look at these 20 powerful photos that will leave you speechless. Some of these photos are of truly historic moments, while others, are quite heartbreaking. World War II veteran from Belarus Konstantin Pronin, 86, sits on a bench as he waits for his comrades at Gorky park during Victory Day in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, May 9, 2011. Konstantin comes to this place every year.

5 Things You Don't Know About Anne Frank and Her Diary 1. Pseudonyms When Anne Frank readied her diary for eventual publication, she created pseudonyms for the people she wrote about in her diary. Although you are familiar with the pseudonyms of Albert Dussel (the real life Freidrich Pfeffer) and Petronella van Daan (the real life Auguste van Pels) because these pseudonyms appear in most published versions of the diary, do you know what pseudonym Anne chose for herself? Even though Anne had chosen pseudonyms for everyone hiding in the Annexe, when it came time to publish the diary after the war, Otto Frank decided to keep the pseudonyms for the other four people in the Annexe but to use the real names of his own family. This is why we know Anne Frank by her real name rather than as Anne Aulis (her original choice of a pseudonym) or as Anne Robin (the name Anne later chose for herself).

Straighforward access to the Museum's archives, including photographs, transcripts of lectures, and the guidelines for teaching about the Holocaust. by nda_librarian May 5

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