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14 Photographs That Shatter Your Image of Famous People. When you step out the door, you're playing a role.

14 Photographs That Shatter Your Image of Famous People

Whether you're a hippie, stock broker, police officer or biker, you dress the way the world expects you to dress, you act the way the world expects you to act. So you can imagine how much more intense this is for celebrities, whose very careers depend on managing a public image down to the molecule. But even they can't keep the occasional image-shattering photo from leaking out to the public ... #14. Dr. Via Biography.com There are two kinds of people in the world: those who, when seeing this photo, immediately hear "Werewolves of London" in their heads, and those who do not. And no, this isn't one of those photo ops where a public figure poses with a prop to look like regular folk.

Which is amazing, considering that a man who would attempt a shot like that in the middle of a match is probably something of a sore winner. . #13. Via Hawking.org.uk On one hand, none of us probably thought that Stephen Hawking was born in a wheelchair. . #12. 14 Photographs That Shatter Your Image of Famous People. #7.

14 Photographs That Shatter Your Image of Famous People

Teenage Eminem With Alf Shirt and Birthday Cake Via Eminemworld.com I've linked to this picture, oh, seven or eight times in my career at Cracked, as it is my favorite celebrity photo of all time. I don't want to say that Eminem's claims of an impoverished life as an abused child aren't true -- I think everyone agrees that they are. To an extent. Still, brooding celebrities who build their career on their dark past do it at the risk of becoming caricatures. . #6. Via Flavorwire.com ... it's still a shock to realize sometimes the man just sat down and ate an entire pizza like Shaggy from Scooby-Doo. This is something everybody should understand about depression, by the way. Via Flavorwire.comThen later played "Cat Puppet" with his daughter while doing a high-pitched cat voice.

Who, What, Why: What is coffee rust? 19 May 2014Last updated at 12:18 ET Who, What, Why The Magazine answers the questions behind the news The US is stepping up support for coffee farmers in Central America.

Who, What, Why: What is coffee rust?

What is the coffee leaf rust that is killing their crop and threatens to push up the price of beans in the shops? Coffee's plague starts with yellow spots and what look like burn marks. Long-Lost Honeymoon Photos From 1939 Will Take Your Breath Away. The bride did not wear white, there was no online registry, and guests certainly didn't use a wedding hashtag.

Long-Lost Honeymoon Photos From 1939 Will Take Your Breath Away

It was 1939; England was on the brink of World War II and Margaret and Denys Gardiner were simply in love. After their wedding, the giddy newlyweds drove around the English countryside for a few weeks before the world was catapulted into chaos. Their honeymoon photos, thought to be lost for the last 75 years, were recently found by the couple's grandson, Barney Britton, while cleaning out his grandmother's attic. They were shot in color -- a novelty at the time -- using 35mm Agfacolor film. What does the discovery of Richard III's remains mean for history? Michael Jones and Philippa Langley have co-authored a new book on the discovery of Richard III's remains, a project that Langley organised and funded.

What does the discovery of Richard III's remains mean for history?

They spoke to Matt Elton about the dig and its challenges, and offered their take on the controversial monarch's life Richard III remains one of England's more controversial monarchs, and he's now also one of the most-talked about following the discovery of his remains beneath a Leicester car park in 2012. Viewpoint: The roots of the battle for free speech. 8 January 2015Last updated at 06:25 ET Voltaire: Often quoted advocate of freedom of expression Historian Tom Holland was one of those who tweeted Charlie Hebdo's cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad in the wake of the deadly attack on the magazine's office.

Viewpoint: The roots of the battle for free speech

Here he explains the ramifications of defending free speech. Religions are not alone in having their martyrs. On 1 July, 1766, in Abbeville in northern France, a young nobleman named Lefebvre de la Barre was found guilty of blasphemy. These crimes, together with the vandalising of a wooden cross on the main bridge of Abbeville, were sufficient to see him sentenced to death. Voltaire himself, informed of his reader's fate, was appalled. Two-and-a-half centuries on, and it is the notion that someone might be put to death for criticising a religious dogma that is likely to strike a majority of people in the West as the blasphemy. Continue reading the main story Tom Holland.

Viewpoint: Why the shadow of WW1 and 1989 hangs over world events. 16 December 2014Last updated at 17:43 ET Many of today's global problems are hangovers from bad, ungenerous decisions at the end of previous conflicts, writes Jeffrey Sachs.

Viewpoint: Why the shadow of WW1 and 1989 hangs over world events

This has been a year of great geopolitical anniversaries.