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DIY No Knit Scarf

DIY No Knit Scarf
We love Rike Feurstein. Her hats are sick and her chunky knits are lusciously bold and amazing. And when we saw her Dylan scarf, we thought it was genius. You’ll start by transforming a skein of yarn into a hank of yarn, which is yarn that is loosely wound into a large ring shape and then twisted. Cut 3 pieces of leather at approximately 1.75″ wide and 4″ long. Voila! (top image from here, rest of images by Honestly…WTF) Related:  knitting

Knitted & Crochet Slipper Boots Step out in style with these beautiful Knitted & Crochet Slipper Boots! You’ll love to make these FREE Patterns and don’t they look fantastic. Click HERE for the FREE Pattern from ‘Garn Studio’ Click HERE for the FREE Pattern from ‘Garn Studio’ Click HERE for the FREE Pattern from ‘Garn Studio’ Click HERE for the FREE Pattern from ‘Garn Studio’ Make these Crochet Cozy Boots – Click HERE Given email address is already subscribed, thank you! Oops. Please provide a valid email address. Thank you, your sign-up request was successful! Please complete the CAPTCHA. Please fill in the required fields.

DIY Color Block Moccasins Our love of Minnatonka moccasins and obsession with Balenciaga‘s Fall 2010 shoes made this DIY we created for Foam Magazine a no brainer. With just a tube of Tulip Soft Fabric Paint, a pair of paintbrushes (one thin and one thick) and a pair of suede moccasins, you’ll be ready to make your own color block shoes. (Tulip Soft Fabric Paint is best paint to use, as it is highly opaque, flexible once it dries and great for suede.) To paint the tops of the moccasins, the fringe will have to be tucked under. Start by making a test patch near one of the holes, as this part will be covered and it’s a great way to get comfortable with your brush and paint. Let dry for at least 2 hours and reassemble the fringe to reveal your new pair of SICK color block mocs! (images by Honestly…WTF)

DIY Lace Earrings Dolce & Gabbana‘s Spring ’11 collection undoubtedly furthered our already fanatical obsession with lace. Honestly, how dreamy is the collection?! We thought we’d make good use of some vintage lace trim we had laying around and turn them into earrings similar to the ones we saw on the runway. Mix equal parts glue to water in a bowl. Submerge the cut shapes into the glue mixture. I haven’t stopped wearing mine since and can’t wait to make more. (top image from Vogue.com, rest of images by Honestly…WTF)

Make a Custom Pair of Tap Pants By Haley Pierson-Cox For me, summer in NYC means two things: 1) I will eventually wear a light skirt into the subway when my hands are full, and 2) on that day, when I step onto the stairs of the station, a gust of wind will come barreling up from below, lifting my skirt and showing my backside to anyone who cares to look. This year, on the very first nice day, my skirt flew up not once, but twice. In the same commute. Grumbling and scrambling to pull it down, it hit me: I definitely needed a pair of tap pants. In case you’re not familiar, tap pants work like a slip, but they’re actually shorts, making them the perfect solution to my summer skirt woes. Materials: Fabric, 1-2 yards nylon or silkFoldover elastic, 1-3 yards, depending on whether you use a sergerLace, 2-3 yards, optionalMeasuring tape Pattern paper; you can also use newspaperRuler Pencil Sewing machine Serger/overlock machine, optionalFabric scissors/rotary cutter Straight pins Water-soluble fabric marker Directions Related

Classic Cuffed Hat For as long as I can remember, every Sunday my grandmother makes fresh pasta from scratch, and every Sunday she uses the same metal pasta maker she got as a wedding anniversary gift from my grandfather in 1961. When we press her to upgrade to a new machine, she always responds, “It’s hard to improve on a classic!” I revisited the truth in my grandmother’s words when I set out to make this winter’s hat. How could I improve on a classic winter hat? Very little, and so my pondering ended with these Classic Cuffed Hats, as reliable and perfectly timeless as a 1961 pasta maker! To ensure a design that would last a half a century, I made a couple of important decisions. Second, I chose a yarn that I think of as an instant classic, Purl Soho’s 100% merino Worsted Twist. Materials Hat with pom pom: 1 (2, 2) skeins of Purl Soho’s Worsted Twist, 100% merino. Baby Size, left, from top to bottom: Paprika Red, Pink Grapefruit, Ochre Yellow and Yellow Zest Gauge Sizes Baby (Kid, Adult) Notes Pattern Begin

DIY Bleach Tie Dye Last summer, we were obsessed with shibori indigo tie dying. No, really . . . we just about dyed anything white in sight. So when Free People asked us to include a DIY in their guest blogger series, we knew a new tie dye project was absolutely in order. To make a grid-like pattern, fold the shirt like an accordion and bind it between two pieces of wood or other flat shaped objects. Before you start bleaching, make sure you are wearing gloves and working outdoors or in a well ventilated area. The rusty brown color will slowly fade into a beautiful lighter shade as it begins to set. Your reverse bleach tie dye shirt is ready to wear! (top image from here, rest of images by HonestlyWTF)

DIY Transparent Clutch Phil Oh spotted this elegant Charlotte Olympia Pandora clutch during Paris Fashion Week and we spotted a DIY. Prada, Chanel & Fendi seem to be seeing clearly too because let’s face it, nothing says “I ain’t got shit to hide” like a transparent clutch. You’ll start by drilling a hole at the top of the plastic box. Push the knob through the hole of the box and replace the washer and nut. Voila! (top image by Phil Oh for Vogue.com, rest of images by Honestly…WTF)

Tutorials Knitting Cables The simple technique of cabling (crossing one group of stitches over another) lends itself to many interpretations in knitting. It's easy to do, you can make all kinds of interesting and imaginative cable patterns. All it takes is a little patience and practice. You can make any kind of cable by suspending (holding) a number of stitches on a cable needle (cn) while you knit that same number of stitches from the LH needle. Standard or rope cables are the most basic cables. If you want to make a cable that looks like it's twisting to the left, you hold your suspended stitches in front of your work while you knit from the LH needle.If you want to make a cable that twists to the right, hold the suspended stitches in back. Instructions for a 6-stitch left-twisting cable usually read something like this: Sl 3 sts to cn, hold in front, k3, k3 from cn. You may also see abbreviations like C3F and C3B. Knitting a standard cable When you knit cables, you don't have to cross stitches on every row.

DIY Ombré Denim Dip dyed ombré denim has been popping up here and there and not only do we love the look, it’s super easy to do yourself! We’ve combined Tory Burch‘s dip dyed jeans and Miss Unkon‘s ombré 501s as inspiration for a pink infused DIY that could be done in a jiffy. Start by rinsing your shorts with water. A bottle of RIT liquid dye amounts to 1 cup; you’ll dye your shorts with the lightest shade first and darkest shade last. Ring out the excess dye and add another 1/3 cup of dye to your bucket. It’s that easy: ombré dip dyed denim shorts! DIY Flower Halo You’ll start by cutting 2 circles from the piece of felt at approximately 2″ in diameter. Form the wires of your halo by molding and bending each piece into a half circle. Lay the two half circles opposite of each other to create a single circle, laying it over the top of your head to check the fit. Wrap floral tape over 2 sections of overlapping wire at 11 o’clock and 3 o’clock. Trim any overlapping pieces with the wire cutters. Using the wire cutters, cut the stem off the flower making sure the back is flat. The possibilities are endless with this as you can wrap flowers around half or the entire perimeter of the halo, reinforcing with glue. Your flower halo is ready to wear! (images by Honestly…WTF)

winding yarn I've always imagined that it would be so much fun to own my own ball winder... to be able to make those adorable little perfect yarn cakes. But I was astounded at the cost. I decided to do a bit of research first to make sure I chose wisely before purchasing. In the meantime, I learned a very simple technique for winding a centre-pull ball of yarn... and it cost me nothing. All you need is a cardboard tube and your own two hands! The perfect size tube is the inner roll from toilet paper. These photos are a tiny bit blurry... because it's actually quite difficult to photograph yourself while your hands are busy winding yarn... I have taken the tube from inside a roll of baking paper, and will need to cut it down to about one third of the size. Make a small snip in the end of the tube. Tie the start of your yarn in a knot. Slip the knot inside the snip you made at the end of the tube. Slide your thumb inside the tube, and hold the yarn in place with your finger as shown. Ta-da!

DIY Shibori Today marks HonestlyWTF’s four year anniversary. Four years! To celebrate, we’re revisiting the very first tutorial we ever featured on the site: shibori tie dye. Lauren and I first discovered shibori after discovering an old photo on the web. The idea of recreating an ancient Japanese dyeing technique inspired us to spend an entire weekend experimenting with our favorite deep blue, indigo. After dyeing just about every white article of clothing in sight, our blue stained fingers excitedly uploaded the tutorial – we couldn’t wait to share it with our 30 readers. You’ll need:an indigo dye kitnatural fiber clothing or fabric2 5 gallon bucketsrubber glovessmall wood squaresrubber bandstwinea PVC pipea long wooden sticka drop clothrubber glovesscissors When choosing fabric or clothing, it’s important that made of natural fibers. Itajime shibori is known as the shape-resist technique. Fold it again in the other direction – again, like an accordion. Wrap the twine around the fabric.

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