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HackQuest

HackQuest
This site offers a unique hack challenge especially for beginners and intermediates. Please feel free to create an account and try your skills with the challenges. If you have problems with challenges please visit our IRC channel: Host: irc.idlemonkeys.net Channel: #hackquest The site is sponsored by Kender and is no longer accepting donations. Partner challenge sites: WeChall - TheBlackSheep - Rankk - - Dare Your Mind

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How To Become A Hacker Copyright © 2001 Eric S. Raymond As editor of the Jargon File and author of a few other well-known documents of similar nature, I often get email requests from enthusiastic network newbies asking (in effect) "how can I learn to be a wizardly hacker?". 7 Most Notorious Computer Hacker Groups of All Time With the recent attack on PlayStation Network and a bunch of high-profile websites, computer hackers are back in the limelight again. Hackers and hacker groups were quite famous in the 80’s and 90’s but their popularity started fading since the Y2K days. Today, we are once again witnessing hackers threatening to take on giant corporations sending chills down everyone's spine. We have already featured here some of the most infamous black hat hackers of all time. This time, we will take a quick look at some of the most notorious computer hacker groups that ever existed: Masters of Deception

White hat (computer security) One of the first instances of an ethical hack being used was a "security evaluation" conducted by the United States Air Force of the Multics operating systems for "potential use as a two-level (secret/top secret) system." Their evaluation found that while Multics was "significantly better than other conventional systems,"[citation needed] it also had "... vulnerabilities in hardware security, software security and procedural security"[citation needed] that could be uncovered with "a relatively low level of effort."[citation needed] The authors performed their tests under a guideline of realism, so that their results would accurately represent the kinds of access that an intruder could potentially achieve. They performed tests that were simple information-gathering exercises, as well as other tests that were outright attacks upon the system that might damage its integrity. Clearly, their audience wanted to know both results.

The Open Organisation Of Lockpickers This is a repository of the most up-to-date versions of Deviant's lock diagrams and animations. Seen in all of the TOOOL educational materials and slide decks, these files are all released under the Creative Commons license. You are free to use any of them for non-commercial purposes, as long as they are properly attributed and the same freedom for others is maintained in all derivative works.

Hacker (programmer subculture) A team of hackers competing in the CTF competition at DEF CON 17 A hacker is an adherent of the subculture that originally emerged in academia in the 1960s, around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)'s Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC)[1] and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.[2] A hacker is someone who loves to program or who enjoys playful cleverness, or a combination of the two.[3] The act of engaging in activities (such as programming or other media[4]) in a spirit of playfulness and exploration is termed hacking.

The Past, Present, and Future of Data Storage As we approach the end of 2011 and look forward to another year, we pause to reflect on the long history of data storage. Mankind's ability to create, process, store, and recall information is light years ahead of the days of cave paintings and engravings on stone tablets. Vast amounts of information can be stored on drives smaller than your thumb, and data centers are cropping up at an increasingly high rate. What does the future of data storage hold? Are we really that close to holographic drives? Is 2012 the year SSDs become mainstream? Hacker ethic While some tenets of hacker ethic were described in other texts like Computer Lib/Dream Machines (1974) by Ted Nelson, Levy appears to have been the first to document both the philosophy and the founders of the philosophy. Levy explains that MIT housed an early IBM 704 computer inside the Electronic Accounting Machinery (EAM) room in 1959. This room became the staging grounds for early hackers, as MIT students from the Tech Model Railroad Club sneaked inside the EAM room after hours to attempt programming the 30-ton, 9-foot-tall (2.7 m) computer. The hacker ethic was described as a "new way of life, with a philosophy, an ethic and a dream". However, the elements of the hacker ethic were not openly debated and discussed; rather they were implicitly accepted and silently agreed upon.[2] The free software movement was born in the early 1980s from followers of the hacker ethic.

Vote Now! Top Ten Web Hacking Techniques of 2011 Every year the Web security community produces a stunning amount of new hacking techniques published in various white papers, blog posts, magazine articles, mailing list emails, etc. Within the thousands of pages are the latest ways to attack websites, Web browsers, Web proxies, and so on. Beyond individual vulnerability instances with CVE numbers or system compromises, we’re talking about actual new and creative methods of Web-based attack. The Top Ten Web Hacking Techniques list encourages information sharing, provides a centralized knowledge-base, and recognizes researchers who contribute excellent work. How the winners were selected…

Hacks at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology A hack in progress in Lobby 7. Although the practice is unsanctioned by the university, and students have sometimes been arraigned on trespassing charges for hacking,[18][19][20] hacks have substantial significance to MIT's history and student culture. Student bloggers working for the MIT Admissions Office have often written about MIT hacks, including those occurring during Campus Preview Weekend (CPW), an event welcoming admitted prospective freshman students.[21] Alumni bloggers on the MIT Alumni Association website also report and document some of the more memorable hacks.[22] Since the mid-1970s, the student-written guide How To Get Around MIT (HowToGAMIT) has included a chapter on hacking, and discusses history, hacker groups, ethics, safety tips, and risks of the activity.[23] Cultural aspects[edit] Residents of MIT's Simmons Hall collaborated to make a smiley face on the building's facade, December 8, 2002.

Solid-state drive DDR SDRAM based SSD. Max 128 GB and 3072 MB/s. PCIe, DRAM and NAND-based SSD. Hacker Manifesto It was written after the author's arrest, and first published in the underground hacker ezine Phrack[2] and can be found on many websites, as well as on t-shirts and in films.[3] Considered a cornerstone of hacker culture,[4] The Manifesto acts as a guideline to hackers across the globe, especially those new to the field. It serves as an ethical foundation for hacking, and asserts that there is a point to hacking that supersedes selfish desires to exploit or harm other people, and that technology should be used to expand our horizons and try to keep the world free. When asked about his motivation for writing the article, Blankenship said, I was going through hacking withdrawal, and Craig/Knight Lightning needed something for an upcoming issue of Phrack.

The Best Hacking Tutorial Sites - Learn Legal Hacking written by: Daniel Robson•edited by: Aaron R.•updated: 2/13/2011 Whether it's to understand potential attack vectors or simply for the fun of it, learning the basics of hacking is something that a lot of people aspire to. Here's our list of the top tutorial based hacking sites. Introduction Films like Swordfish and Hackers have made hacking seem cool, a lifestyle choice almost. However most techies know that in reality it's often a difficult and time consuming process. 8 Things You Won't Believe Can Be Hacked If movies are to be believed, hackers are mostly kept busy fighting the man with CGI animations of smiley faces, or else dwelling in the darkest corners of their mothers' basements and doing purely nerdy stuff that never affects the real world. But neither assumption is true: Hacking does not look like a rad skateboarder busting a kickflip over an onyx tower, and hackers do gain access to things that can affect your daily life ... and sometimes, even end it. #8. Explode Your Genitals

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