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Getting Started

Getting Started
Most webmasters are familiar with HTML tags on their pages. Usually, HTML tags tell the browser how to display the information included in the tag. For example, <h1>Avatar</h1> tells the browser to display the text string "Avatar" in a heading 1 format. However, the HTML tag doesn't give any information about what that text string means—"Avatar" could refer to the hugely successful 3D movie, or it could refer to a type of profile picture—and this can make it more difficult for search engines to intelligently display relevant content to a user. Schema.org provides a collection of shared vocabularies webmasters can use to mark up their pages in ways that can be understood by the major search engines: Google, Microsoft, Yandex and Yahoo! 1. 1a. Your web pages have an underlying meaning that people understand when they read the web pages. 1b. itemscope and itemtype Let's start with a concrete example. To begin, identify the section of the page that is "about" the movie Avatar. Back to top 1d.

http://schema.org/docs/gs.html

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HTML Microdata Abstract This specification defines the HTML microdata mechanism. This mechanism allows machine-readable data to be embedded in HTML documents in an easy-to-write manner, with an unambiguous parsing model. It is compatible with numerous other data formats including RDF and JSON. HTML5 Canvas Drawing Library Exploration: Paper.js var currentShape="circle"; var isPaused = true; var isInitialized = false; var buttons = []; var pauseButton; The Google Analytics Setup I Use on Every Site I Build — Philip Walton Google Analytics is a powerful yet quite complicated tool. And unfortunately, the truth is most people who use it don’t reap its full benefits. There’s a lot of excellent and free content out there that explains how to use Google Analytics, but most of it is rather narrowly focused on use cases that primarily apply to marketers and advertisers; very little is geared toward web developers who simply want to better understand how people are using the sites they build.

FAQ What is the purpose of schema.org? Why are Google, Bing, Yandex and Yahoo! collaborating? Microformat A microformat (sometimes abbreviated μF) is a web-based approach to semantic markup which seeks to re-use existing HTML/XHTML tags to convey metadata[1] and other attributes in web pages and other contexts that support (X)HTML such as RSS. This approach allows software to process information intended for end-users (such as contact information, geographic coordinates, calendar events, and similar information) automatically. Although the content of web pages is technically already capable of "automated processing", and has been since the inception of the web, such processing is difficult because the traditional markup tags used to display information on the web do not describe what the information means.[2] Microformats can bridge this gap by attaching semantics, and thereby obviate other, more complicated, methods of automated processing, such as natural language processing or screen scraping. Background[edit] Neither CommerceNet nor Microformats.org operates as a standards body. class

About microdata - Webmaster Tools Help The HTML5 microdata specification is a way to label content to describe a specific type of information—for example, reviews, person information, or events. Each information type describes a specific type of item, such as a person, and event, or a review. For example, an event has the properties venue, starting time, name, and category. Microdata uses simple attributes in HTML tags (often <span> or <div>) to assign brief and descriptive names to items and properties. Here's an example of a short HTML block showing basic contact information for Bob Smith. <div> My name is Bob Smith but people call me Smithy.

Interactive Maps with Paper.js Posted in: Programming, Javascript, Fun By Adam Marshall, 4 March 2014 I've been wanting to do a map-based project for a while. Recently, I came into a possession of a high quality library of maps, Mountain High Maps 2.5. How to radically improve your website performance (Part 2) It’s time to step-up the game and become great at what you love doing the most! We have already looked at some great improvements in Part 1 (see below) of this article. We saw innovative ways on how to make a website lighter and how to improve our back-end performance. Now we are going to have a look at how we can efficiently adjust and implement server side improvements. … so without further ado: Server side improvements

RDFa Primer 1 Introduction The web is a rich, distributed repository of interconnected information organized primarily for human consumption. On a typical web page, an XHTML author might specify a headline, then a smaller sub-headline, a block of italicized text, a few paragraphs of average-size text, and, finally, a few single-word links.

Microdata (HTML5) Microdata is a WHATWG HTML specification used to nest metadata within existing content on web pages.[1] Search engines, web crawlers, and browsers can extract and process Microdata from a web page and use it to provide a richer browsing experience for users. Search engines benefit greatly from direct access to this structured data because it allows search engines to understand the information on web pages and provide more relevant results to users.[2][3] Microdata uses a supporting vocabulary to describe an item and name-value pairs to assign values to its properties.[4] Microdata is an attempt to provide a simpler[citation needed] way of annotating HTML elements with machine-readable tags than the similar approaches of using RDFa and microformats. Microdata vocabularies provide the semantics, or meaning of an Item. Web developers can design a custom vocabulary or use vocabularies available on the web. Here is the same markup with added Schema.org[5][6][7] Microdata:

Microdata You are here: Home Dive Into HTML5 Diving In There are over 100 elements in HTML5. Some are purely semantic, others are just containers for scripted APIs. Throughout the history of HTML, standards wonks have argued about which elements should be included in the language.

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