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Thedesigninspiration

Thedesigninspiration
Usually, we admire that the artists can create characters vividly, while this time, we will introduce a different artist who turns living, breathing people into characters in oil painting. That is Alexa Meade. Alexa Meade is a 23-year-old artist based in Washington, DC area. She spent four summers interning on Capitol Hill and in 2008 was a press staffer on the Obama Campaign. She graduated in 2009 from Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY with a bachelor’s degree in political science. She never attended art school nor has she ever taken advanced painting courses. She applies acrylic paint to the surfaces of people, objects, and walls in a broad brushstroke that mimics the appearance of brushwork in a painting in a technique that she innovated.

http://thedesigninspiration.com/articles/incredible-living-painting-with-realistic-body-paint/

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chicquero “The inspiration for this book came to me one afternoon as I watched my son, Hudson, playing with his toy bus. I was trying to keep pace with his three-year-old mind as he got deeper and deeper into a fantasy involving nothing more than a yellow plastic box and armless figurines. At least that’s what I saw. He saw frantic commuters rushing to catch the 77 local bus to Australia. He jumped in place, mouth open and slapping his knees, joyously reacting to a world I couldn’t see, but one powerfully present for him.” “What happens to this enthusiasm, this ability to be wholly present in the moment?

6 Things I Learned About Painting From the Met's Blockbuster Matisse Show Last week, I finally visited the Met’s stellar exhibition, “Matisse: In Search of True Painting.” The show was, as I hoped, a refreshingly engaging experience that breaks down Henri Matisse’s meticulous and academic painting process into sections, addressing recurring themes that are applicable to both modern painters and art students today. In a recent article, New York Times art critic Roberta Smith aptly called the show “one of the most thrillingly instructive exhibitions about this painter, or painting in general, that you may ever see.” She’s not wrong. Concepts like how to paint light, when to use the color black, or how long to spend on the details of a model you have limited time with are best learned from a painter who spent his lifetime asking these questions, and who was willing to share the fruits of his labor.

Ephemeral Portraits Cut from Layers of Wire Mesh by Seung Mo Park Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh. Each piece is several inches thick as each plane that forms the final image is spaced a few finger widths apart, giving the portraits a certain depth and dimensionality that’s hard to convey in a photograph, but this video on YouTube shows it pretty well. Park just exhibited this month at Blank Space Gallery in New York as part of his latest series Maya (meaning “illusion” in Sanskrit). You can see much more at West Collects.

Brooding Cityscapes Painted with Oils by Jeremy Mann San Francisco-based artist Jeremy Mann executes these sublime, moody cityscapes using oil paints. To create each work he relies on a wide range of techniques including surface staining, the use of solvents to wipe away paint, and the application of broad, gritty marks with an ink brayer. The resulting paintings are dark and atmospheric, urban streets seemingly drenched in rain and mystery.

Anamorphic Sculptures London-based artist Jonty Hurwitz creates ‘Anamorphic Sculptures’ which only reveal themselves once facing a reflective cylinder. Hurwitz took an engineering degree in Johannesburg where he discovered the fine line between art and science. He has lived in England for many years, working in the online industry though he quietly levitated into the world of art inspired by a need to make ‘something real’. Hurwitz discovered that he could use science as an artistic paintbrush. Each of his sculptures is a study on the physics of how we perceive space and is the stroke of over 1 billion calculations and algorithms.

Place A Cylindrical Mirror On These Drawings And They Instantly Come To Life István Orosz is a Hungarian artist who is known for his use of the technique anamorphosis. Orosz will create a drawing, that at first glance could seem abstract. It is not until he places a cylindrical mirror on the artwork that the illustration comes to life. Naples Sailor Paints Haze Gray Masterpiece Better than the Mona Lisa. GAETA, ITALY – Raphael. Michelangelo. bubble wrap typography by lo siento sep 04, 2012 bubble wrap typography by lo siento ‘+81 magazine’ cover design by lo siento spanish graphic design studio lo siento conceived the cover for japan’s +81 magazine, where the artist injects bubble wrap blisters with colored water to spell out the issue’s subject ‘next creativity’. the work is amongst a diverse range of typographical explorations – moving beyond the traditional realm of 2D to design for various identities and projects. ‘4D type’ is one concept that sees the idea of lettering to become viewable from all angles, or ‘empo’, which is an alphabet created as part of an identity for an osteopathy office informed by the human body.

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