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Vannevar Bush

Vannevar Bush
Vannevar Bush (/væˈniːvɑr/ van-NEE-var; March 11, 1890 – June 28, 1974) was an American engineer, inventor and science administrator, whose most important contribution was as head of the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) during World War II, through which almost all wartime military R&D was carried out, including initiation and early administration of the Manhattan Project. His office was considered one of the key factors in winning the war. For his master's thesis, Bush invented and patented a "profile tracer", a mapping device for assisting surveyors. Bush was appointed to the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in 1938, and soon became its chairman. Early life and work[edit] Vannevar Bush was born in Everett, Massachusetts, on March 11, 1890, the third child and only son of Perry Bush, the local Universalist pastor, and his wife Emma Linwood née Paine. In 1924, Bush and Marshall teamed up with physicist Charles G. World War II period[edit] Related:  Wiki

The Rediscovery of Man The Rediscovery of Man: The Complete Short Science Fiction of Cordwainer Smith (ISBN 0-915368-56-0) is a 1993 book containing the complete collected short fiction of science fiction author Cordwainer Smith. It was edited by James A. Mann and published by NESFA Press. Most of the stories take place in Smith's future history set in the universe of the Instrumentality of Mankind; the collection is arranged in the chronological order in which the stories take place in the fictional timeline. The collection also contains short stories which do not take place in this universe. Within the context of the future history, the Rediscovery of Mankind refers to the Instrumentality's re-introduction of chance and unhappiness into the sterile utopia that they had created for humanity. List of Instrumentality of Man stories[edit] "No, No, Not Rogov!"" "The Queen of the Afternoon" is a posthumous sequel to "Mark Elf". Stories marked with an asterisk were published posthumously. Other stories[edit]

Marcel Duchamp Marcel Duchamp (French: [maʁsɛl dyʃɑ̃]; 28 July 1887 – 2 October 1968) was a French-American painter, sculptor, chess player, and writer whose work is associated with Dadaism[1][2] and conceptual art,[3] although not directly associated with Dada groups. Duchamp is commonly regarded, along with Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, as one of the three artists who helped to define the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the twentieth century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture.[4][5][6][7] Duchamp has had an immense impact on twentieth-century and twenty first-century art. By World War I, he had rejected the work of many of his fellow artists (like Henri Matisse) as "retinal" art, intended only to please the eye. Instead, Duchamp wanted to put art back in the service of the mind.[8] Importance[edit] Early life[edit] Of Eugene and Lucie Duchamp's seven children, one died as an infant and four became successful artists.

Ted Nelson Biography[edit] Nelson is the son of Emmy Award-winning director Ralph Nelson and the Academy Award-winning actress Celeste Holm.[1] His parents' marriage was brief and he was mostly raised by his grandparents, first in Chicago and later in Greenwich Village.[2] Nelson earned a BA from Swarthmore College in 1959. During college and graduate school, he envisioned a computer-based writing system that would provide a lasting repository for the world's knowledge and also permit greater flexibility of drawing connections between ideas. Xanadu[edit] Nelson founded Project Xanadu in 1960 with the goal of creating a computer network with a simple user interface. Nelson has stated that some aspects of his vision are being fulfilled by Tim Berners-Lee's invention of the World Wide Web, but he dislikes the World Wide Web, XML and all embedded markup – regarding Berners-Lee's work as a gross over-simplification of his original vision: Other projects[edit] ZigZag[edit] Influence and recognition[edit]

Buckminster Fuller Richard Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller (/ˈfʊlər/; July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American architect, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor, and futurist. Buckminster Fuller was the second president of Mensa from 1974 to 1983.[2] Biography[edit] Years later, he decided that this sort of experience had provided him with not only an interest in design, but also a habit of being familiar with and knowledgeable about the materials that his later projects would require. Fuller earned a machinist's certification, and knew how to use the press brake, stretch press, and other tools and equipment used in the sheet metal trade.[3] Education[edit] Wartime experience[edit] Between his sessions at Harvard, Fuller worked in Canada as a mechanic in a textile mill, and later as a laborer in the meat-packing industry. Depression and epiphany[edit] Buckminster Fuller recalled 1927 as a pivotal year of his life. In 1927 Fuller, then aged 32, lost his job as president of Stockade. Recovery[edit]

Simulated reality Simulated reality is the hypothesis that reality could be simulated—for example by computer simulation—to a degree indistinguishable from "true" reality. It could contain conscious minds which may or may not be fully aware that they are living inside a simulation. This is quite different from the current, technologically achievable concept of virtual reality. Virtual reality is easily distinguished from the experience of actuality; participants are never in doubt about the nature of what they experience. Simulated reality, by contrast, would be hard or impossible to separate from "true" reality. There has been much debate over this topic, ranging from philosophical discourse to practical applications in computing. Types of simulation[edit] Brain-computer interface[edit] Virtual people[edit] In a virtual-people simulation, every inhabitant is a native of the simulated world. Arguments[edit] Simulation argument[edit] 1. 2. 3. Relativity of reality[edit] Computationalism[edit] Dreaming[edit]

Norbert Wiener Norbert Wiener (November 26, 1894 – March 18, 1964) was an American mathematician and philosopher. He was Professor of Mathematics at MIT. A famous child prodigy, Wiener later became an early researcher in stochastic and noise processes, contributing work relevant to electronic engineering, electronic communication, and control systems. Wiener is considered the originator of cybernetics, a formalization of the notion of feedback, with implications for engineering, systems control, computer science, biology, neuroscience, philosophy, and the organization of society. Biography[edit] Youth[edit] Wiener was born in Columbia, Missouri, the first child of Leo Wiener and Bertha Kahn, Jews[1] of Polish and German origin, respectively. Despite being raised in a Jewish family, he later became an agnostic.[2] After graduating from Ayer High School in 1906 at 11 years of age, Wiener entered Tufts College. Harvard and World War I[edit] After the war[edit] During and after World War II[edit] Work[edit] 1953.

Serial Experiments Lain Serial Experiments Lain (シリアルエクスペリメンツレイン Shiriaru Ekusuperimentsu Rein), is an anime series directed by Ryutaro Nakamura, original character design by Yoshitoshi ABe, screenplay written by Chiaki J. Konaka, and produced by Yasuyuki Ueda (credited as production 2nd) for Triangle Staff. It was broadcast on TV Tokyo from July to September 1998. A PlayStation game with the same title was released in November 1998 by Pioneer LDC. The anime series was licensed in North America by Geneon (formerly Pioneer Entertainment) on DVD, VHS, and LaserDisc. However, Geneon closed its USA division in December 2007 and the series went out-of-print as a result.[3] However, at Anime Expo 2010, North American distributor Funimation Entertainment announced that it has licensed the series and was re-released in 2012.[4] However, Funimation released few episodes on YouTube. Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Lain Iwakura (岩倉 玲音, Iwakura Rein?) Masami Eiri (英利 政美, Eiri Masami?) The key designer of Protocol Seven.

Stability: how life began and why it can’t rest – Addy Pross Biology is wondrously strange – so familiar, yet so strikingly different to physics and chemistry. We know where we are with inanimate matter. Ever since Isaac Newton, it has answered to a basically mechanical view of nature, blindly following its laws without regard for purposes. Even after Charles Darwin, we continue to struggle with that difference. Popular now Game theory’s cure for corruption? Will we ever understand the beginning of the universe? How humans made fire, and fire made us human I believe that it is now possible to bridge that gap. But this is not good enough. I am a theoretical chemist drawn to a new field, systems chemistry. And so the conceptual unification of biology with physics and chemistry is now underway. The name we give to the process by which simple life emerged from inanimate matter is ‘abiogenesis’. We now know that a mechanism akin to Darwinian evolution actually operates, in the first place, on nonliving matter – even on single molecules. Explore Aeon

Schumann resonances Animation of Schumann resonance in Earth's atmosphere. The Schumann resonances (SR) are a set of spectrum peaks in the extremely low frequency (ELF) portion of the Earth's electromagnetic field spectrum. Schumann resonances are global electromagnetic resonances, excited by lightning discharges in the cavity formed by the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. Description[edit] This global electromagnetic resonance phenomenon is named after physicist Winfried Otto Schumann who predicted it mathematically in 1952. In the normal mode descriptions of Schumann resonances, the fundamental mode is a standing wave in the Earth–ionosphere cavity with a wavelength equal to the circumference of the Earth. Observations of Schumann resonances have been used to track global lightning activity. History[edit] In 1893, George Francis FitzGerald noted that the upper layers of the atmosphere must be fairly good conductors. Basic theory[edit] In an ideal cavity, the resonant frequency of the -th mode

The AJ List: The 21 Best Thoreau Quotes Like two of our other favorite legends of outdoor literature, Ed Abbey and John Muir, Henry David Thoreau could be said to be a motivational speaker. If you need someone to light a fire under your ass to either a) get outside or b) start living or c) both, just go back 160 years to the stuff Thoreau was writing. It’s hard to believe he put all this down on paper before our modern rat race, much less so many generations before. Here are our favorites of what the man said: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Roswell UFO incident Coordinates: The Roswell UFO incident took place in the U.S. in June or July 1947, when an airborne object crashed on a ranch near Roswell, New Mexico. Explanations of what took place are based on both official and unofficial communications. Although the crash is attributed to a secret U.S. military Air Force surveillance balloon by the U.S. government,[1] the most famous explanation of what occurred is that the object was a spacecraft containing extraterrestrial life. Since the late 1970s, the Roswell incident has been the subject of much controversy, and conspiracy theories have arisen about the event. The United States Armed Forces maintains that what was recovered near Roswell was debris from the crash of an experimental high-altitude surveillance balloon belonging to what was then a classified (top secret) program named Mogul. Subsequently the incident faded from the attention of UFO researchers for over 30 years. Contemporary accounts[edit] Witnesses[edit]

The AJ List: The 23 Best Ed Abbey Quotes Ed Abbey died 25 years ago this week, and a couple friends carried his body out to the desert and buried it illegally, just like he wanted. It was a fitting statement for a man who spent his life loving the desert and wilderness, and raising hell about protecting it. We love Abbey for his passion for canyon country, his cantankerous attitude, and his eternal quotability. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23.

Majestic 12 In UFO conspiracy theories, Majestic 12 (or MJ-12) is the code name of an alleged secret committee of scientists, military leaders, and government officials, formed in 1947 by an executive order by U.S. President Harry S. Truman to facilitate recovery and investigation of alien spacecraft. The concept originated in a series of supposedly leaked secret government documents first circulated by ufologists in 1984. History and analysis[edit] Claiming to be connected to the United States Air Force Office of Special Investigations, a man named Richard Doty told filmmaker Linda Moulton Howe that the MJ-12 story was true, and showed Howe unspecified documents purporting to prove the existence of small, grey humanoid aliens originating from the Zeta Reticuli star system. The FBI began its own investigation of the supposed "secret" documents and quickly formed doubts as to their authenticity. Later in 1996, a document called the MJ-12 "Special Operations Manual" circulated among ufologists.

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