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Team-based care in Northern BC: North Peace Division’s journey to an integrated model of care. Issue: BCMJ, Vol. 59, No. 4, May 2017, page(s) 228-229 GPSCSusan Papadionissiou Team-based care is a core attribute of the patient medical home model,[1] and a key foundational piece in building an integrated system of primary and community care.

Team-based care in Northern BC: North Peace Division’s journey to an integrated model of care

A comprehensive team-based care approach enables providers to work together more effectively to create a clear path to care and provide efficient services to vulnerable and high-needs patients. This approach also benefits physicians by helping them achieve a better work-life balance and by ensuring that responsibility for supporting patients with complex needs does not rest solely on the physician’s shoulders.[1]

Diagnoses and imaging utilization for common shoulder disorders by referring physicians in British Columbia. Background: Determining an accurate diagnosis for shoulder pain can be challenging.

Diagnoses and imaging utilization for common shoulder disorders by referring physicians in British Columbia

Because advanced imaging studies ordered by referring physicians may be unnecessary or have a negative impact on patient care, we sought to determine whether the assessment and imaging protocols used in the primary care setting enhance diagnostic accuracy or serve only to increase both costs and referral wait times. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, observational cohort study utilizing a patient chart review to compare the diagnoses of referring physicians with the diagnoses of an orthopaedic specialist.

The study included all patients referred to the practice of a single shoulder surgeon between January 2011 and May 2015. Nanaimo seniors rally against elder care treatment. NANAIMO — After watching their spouses wither in a residential care home in Nanaimo, two local seniors are speaking out about their concerns.

Nanaimo seniors rally against elder care treatment

Geir Larsen's wife Jeannie was admitted to Dufferin Place, run by Island Health, in October 2014 and she passed away in care on July 28, 2016. Larsen said he expected his wife's final years to be as peaceful as possible after years of home care, a place where “it's taken care of, you're shown respect, you're maintained, kept clean, fed. The genius of frugal innovation. iStock If an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty, then the developing world must be filled with optimists.

The genius of frugal innovation

There, people have learned to get more value from limited resources and find creative ways to reuse what they already have. The origins of publicly funded medical care in BC and the BCMA’s contributions. The 50th anniversary of the BC Medical Plan, the first government-funded medical care program in British Columbia, was recognized on 1 September 2015.

The origins of publicly funded medical care in BC and the BCMA’s contributions

But long before any government was prepared to do so, the then-BCMA (now Doctors of BC) was at the forefront of establishing prepaid medical plans for the citizens of this province. The history of publicly funded medical care in BC and Canada dates back to 1919 when the Liberal government of BC established the first of many Royal Commissions to consider creating a government-sponsored plan that would provide prepaid medical coverage in the province. “Deplorable” for government to spend less on home support while number of seniors needing it rises, critic says. The Liberal government is being “penny-wise but pound-foolish” by not investing more in home support for seniors, says NDP health critic Judy Darcy.

“Deplorable” for government to spend less on home support while number of seniors needing it rises, critic says

“It’s deplorable. I haven’t met a senior who doesn’t want to live in their own home as long as they can yet we are not investing in home support for people to live independently. It reinforces how wrong the priorities are for this government to brag about a $2 billion surplus yet not invest in our vulnerable seniors,” she said. According to the Monitoring Seniors’ Services report, released Tuesday by the B.C. Seniors Advocate, the number of seniors in B.C. requiring home support long-term increased by two per cent in 2015 but the average home support hours delivered to them decreased by two per cent.

Fraser Health Authority had the sharpest decline in home support hours, with a 4.8 per cent decline, followed by Northern Health with a 3.2 per cent drop, Vancouver Island with 2.4 per cent and Vancouver Coastal with 1.9 per cent. Cover up: The lack of evidence for vaccinate or mask policies. Issue: BCMJ, Vol. 58, No. 10, December 2016, page(s) 554, 556 Point CounterpointWill Offley, RN When a public health policy is put into effect to reduce a risk to patients, best practice calls for evidence that the risk actually exists, consistent application of the policy, and an assessment of whether the policy achieves its stated goals.

Cover up: The lack of evidence for vaccinate or mask policies

Failure to meet these criteria indicates the need to reconsider the policy. The biggest source of waste in Canadian health care? The private, for-profit sector : Policy Note. Nov 21, 2016 By Alex Hemingway Brian Day’s legal battle against universal public health care in Canada is now before the BC Supreme Court.

The biggest source of waste in Canadian health care? The private, for-profit sector : Policy Note

Day—along with other would-be profit-makers—are hawking unprecedented privatization as the solution to challenges in Canada’s health care system. But two crucial facts are often missed in debates about public vs. private health care. First, Canada already leaves more of our health care to the private sector than most industrialized countries. And second, the private, for-profit sector is the single biggest source of waste and inefficiency in Canadian health care. The CareMore Model. BC physicians reduce unnecessary antibiotic use—and costs. It is rare to find a health intervention that both improves a standard of practice and reduces costs, but this seems to be the case for the Do Bugs Need Drugs?

BC physicians reduce unnecessary antibiotic use—and costs

Program in BC. The World Health Organization and the Public Health Agency of Canada recognize the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms as being among the most significant threats to health and health care–system sustainability. Waiting too long for an MRI or CT scan? Don’t blame doctors for ordering too many: BCMJ. By Pamela Fayerman B.C. doctors aren’t ordering too many MRI and CT scans.

Waiting too long for an MRI or CT scan? Don’t blame doctors for ordering too many: BCMJ

New research has found virtually all such tests performed were appropriate. In a study ordered by the provincial government and published in the B.C. Medical Journal, researchers used data collected by an independent research company to look at how many MRI and CT scans done on heads, spines and knees were unwarranted, as judged by national guidelines and other standards. (Read the latest National Maximum Wait Time Access Targets For Medical Imaging report from the Canadian Association of Radiologists by clicking here). They found that in a sampling of nearly 2,000 requisitions for such tests last year, just two per cent of imaging scans were inappropriate. The government became concerned after federal data showed that between 2004 and 2007, the number of CT and MRI examinations had increased 50 per cent. Co-author Dr. CMAJ Mobile. Background: In 2007, the province of British Columbia implemented incentive payments to primary care physicians for the provision of comprehensive, continuous, guideline-informed care for patients with 2 or more chronic conditions.

We examined the impact of this program on primary care access and continuity, rates of hospital admission and costs. Methods: We analyzed all BC patients who qualified for the incentive based on their diagnostic profile. We tracked primary care contacts and continuity, hospital admissions (total, via the emergency department and for targeted conditions), and cost of physician services, hospital care and pharmaceuticals, for 24 months before and 24 months after the intervention. British Columbia’s doctors incentive program fails patients: research. British Columbia has spent hundreds of millions of dollars doling out incentives to doctors while failing to improve the quality of care for patients who face multiple health problems simultaneously, new research claims. The province launched its Complex Care Initiative almost a decade ago, allowing doctors who take on patients with two or more possibly interacting health issues to charge an extra $315 each year a patient.

From the program’s inception in 2007 until last year, B.C. had spent more than $397-million paying for the Complex Care Initiative. But new research published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal concluded the incentive program didn’t work. Instead, the research team says B.C. should consider doing things differently if it wants to improve care for patients facing multiple health issues. Dr. Incentive-Based Primary Care: Cost and Utilization Analysis.