background preloader

Travail des enfants

Facebook Twitter

Fair World Project. Sign the Petiton. Sorry, we couldn't find your address.

Sign the Petiton

Please correctly spell out the full address, and do not abbreviate (for example, spell out SAINT PAUL instead of St. Paul). Please refrain from including any extra dashes or symbols when you enter your street address. Small-scale cocoa farmers live in poverty as large multi-national chocolate companies profit. This needs to change now. A few facts about chocolate: U.S. chocolate sales could reach $25 billion a year in just the next two years Over $2 billion of this is spent on chocolate at Easter alone Over 2 million children in West Africa are involved in cocoa production, 90% in dangerous work, and this number is on the rise Cote d'Ivoire is the largest producer of cocoa Cocoa contributes 20% of Cote d'Ivoire total GDP of $32 billion And that means U.S. chocolate sales are equal to about ¾ of this country's total economy!

Chocolate is big business, especially around holidays. And prices paid to farmers are set to drop. What can be done? ?akid=25514.1505673. Tous les enfants aiment-ils le Nutella?

?akid=25514.1505673

Oui, sûrement...sauf ceux qui sont réduits en esclavage pour le produire. Nestlé: mettez fin à l’exploitation d’enfants dans vos plantations de cacao! Pas les enfants!

Nestlé: mettez fin à l’exploitation d’enfants dans vos plantations de cacao!

Nestlé est accusé de traite et de travail forcé d'enfants dans les plantations de cacao en Côte d'Ivoire. Nous sommes en 2015 et pour accroître ses profits criminels, le géant du chocolat va jusqu'à réduire des enfants en esclavage. Texte de la pétition: Indonesia: Protect children from harmful tobacco farming.

Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria.

texte de la pétition: Indonesia: Protect children from harmful tobacco farming

Texte de la pétition: Demand an end to child labor in cobalt mines! Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra.

texte de la pétition: Demand an end to child labor in cobalt mines!

Kellogg´s & Co : les enfants à l’école, pas dans les plantations. What-you-should-know-about-the-cobalt-in-your-smartphone. Cobalt is used to build lithium-ion batteries found in mobile technology.

what-you-should-know-about-the-cobalt-in-your-smartphone

Much of it comes from Congo, where men, women, and children endure dangerous and unhealthy conditions to satisfy our hunger for new devices. It's time we paid attention. You are probably reading this article on a tablet, smartphone, or laptop computer. If so, your device could very well contain cobalt from the Democratic Republic of Congo, an impoverished yet mineral-rich nation in central Africa, that provides 60 percent of the world’s cobalt.

(The remaining 40 percent is sourced in smaller amounts from a number of other nations, including China, Canada, Russia, Australia and the Philippines.) Cobalt is used to build rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, an integral part of the mobile technology that has become commonplace in recent years. “Lithium-ion batteries were supposed to be different from the dirty, toxic technologies of the past. Fairphone (Facebook)/via Manufacturers don’t have satisfactory answers. Take Action. Eliminate Child Labor from Cocoa by Emphasizing Children, Not PR Claims. Eliminate Child Labor from Cocoa by Emphasizing Children, Not PR Claims The convergence of Fair Trade Month (October) and Halloween makes it hard not to think about chocolate and kids.

Eliminate Child Labor from Cocoa by Emphasizing Children, Not PR Claims

Not just the kids who eat the chocolate, but also the child slaves who harvest the cocoa. There is one particular moment from the 2013 meeting of the World Fair Trade Organization that I come back to periodically. A representative of Fairtrade International (FLO) was presenting and a slide of some of their global fair trade licensees came up, which included many well-known brands, among them Nestlé. A woman in the middle of my row gasped and yelled out “Nestlé?” Yet they can and they do, because fair trade labelers like FLO and Fair Trade USA look only at single ingredients or products, not at the practices of the company. There is growing concern for the more than 2 million children in West Africa working in the cocoa sector, many of whom work without pay or perform dangerous work. Travail des enfants en Bolivie - Un autre regard. Il y a un an, la Bolivie adoptait une loi qui autorise le travail des enfants à partir de 10 ans, faisant de ce pays l’unique au monde à l’autoriser avant 14 ans.

Travail des enfants en Bolivie - Un autre regard

Après le tollé international, retour sur cette loi controversée, à hauteur du regard des enfants. « Je travaille depuis que j’ai des souvenirs », lâche dans un sourire malicieux Jorge Luis, avant de se remettre à arpenter un des principaux carrefours de la ville d’El Alto, à la recherche de passagers. Survêtement impeccable, baskets à la mode, il n’a pas tout à fait le look que l’on imagine d’un enfant travailleur. Cash Investigation : Les secrets inavouables de nos téléphones portables (04-11-2014) Demand an end to child labour in the mining industry. 8€/mois pour du t-shirt. Il photographie le travail des enfants… On estime que 168 millions d’enfants travaillent actuellement dans le monde (source).

8€/mois pour du t-shirt. Il photographie le travail des enfants…

Même si c’est moitié moins qu’en 2000, c’est encore beaucoup trop. Certains d’entre eux réalisent des travaux particulièrement dangereux sans la moindre protection légale. Un photographe du Bangladesh va se pencher sur cette réalité qui frappe son pays. « Pour abolir le travail des enfants, vous devez le rendre visible.« , c’est l’adage de GMB Akash, un photographe bangladais concerné par les injustices subies par les enfants de son pays. Abolir ne suffit pourtant pas toujours. Voici une petite sélection de ses clichés qui laissent sans voix. Non aux téléphones fabriqués par des enfants victimes du travail forcé ! Esclavage dans le monde. Enough Games Nintendo: Time for Action Against Slavery. Stop poisoning children by putting them to work in gold mines. Please sign and share this petition worldwide in an effort to put an end to children working in the gold mines and subjecting them to the poisoning of the mercury and other gases they encounter.

Stop poisoning children by putting them to work in gold mines

Mining most often in many countries is a family affair. It is not just a business for the “man of the house” but also the children. It is estimated that more than one million children work in the gold mining industry. This is predominantly an international issue. Most of us may not realize what goes into gold mining; it is not as visualized on television, panning for gold.

Children should not be working in these mines that could affect the rest of their lives. Child labor unfortunately is very common in many international countries such as Indonesia and the Philippines. Please sign and share this petition worldwide in an effort to put an end to children working in the gold mines and subjecting them to the poisoning of the mercury and other gases they encounter. less. À Cargill : le travail des enfants est intolérable. Le travail dans les plantations au lieu de l'école : tel est le sort cruel de cette petite fille (photo: Jason Motlagh / Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting) Des conditions de travail proches de l’esclavage : c'est ce qu'endurent hommes, femmes et enfants dans les plantations du groupe KLK, un fournisseur en huile de palme du géant mondial de l'agroalimentaire Cargill. Demandons à Cargill de bannir cette huile de palme si nocive pour l'homme et pour l'environnement Forcés à faire les travaux les plus durs et les plus dangereux, sept jours sur sept, enfermés, battus, leurs salaires non payés : hommes, femmes et enfants subissent un sort comparable à de l'esclavage dans les plantations de palmiers à huile du groupe malaisien KLK.

Le travail des enfants. Une enquête éloquente sur le travail des enfants dans le monde ... Interview de Kailash Satyarthii, militant des droits de l'enfant. India: Schools, not sweatshops.