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List of forms of word play

List of forms of word play
This is a list of techniques used in word play with Wikipedia articles. Techniques that involve the phonetic values of words Mondegreen: a mishearing (usually unintentional) ase as a homophone or near-homophone that has as a result acquired a new meaning. Techniques that involve semantics and the choosing of words Anglish: a writing using exclusively words of Germanic originAuto-antonym: a word that contains opposite meaningsAutogram: a sentence that provide an inventory of its own charactersMalapropism: incorrect usage of a word by substituting a similar-sounding word with different meaningNeologism: creating new words Portmanteau: a new word that fuses two words or morphemesRetronym: creating a new word to denote an old object or concept whose original name has come to be used for something elseOxymoron: a combination of two contradictory termsPun: deliberately mixing two similar-sounding wordsSlang: the use of informal words or expressions Techniques that involve the formation of a name Related:  Extra Pounds□Eironeiaτέχνιχ

100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. Here’s a list of adjectives: Subscribe to Receive our Articles and Exercises via Email You will improve your English in only 5 minutes per day, guaranteed! 21 Responses to “100 Exquisite Adjectives” Rebecca Fantastic list!

Figure of speech A figure of speech is the use of a word or a phrase, which transcends its literal interpretation. It can be a special repetition, arrangement or omission of words with literal meaning, or a phrase with a specialized meaning not based on the literal meaning of the words in it, as in idiom, metaphor, simile, hyperbole, personification, or synecdoche. Figures of speech often provide emphasis, freshness of expression, or clarity. However, clarity may also suffer from their use, as any figure of speech introduces an ambiguity between literal and figurative interpretation. Rhetoric originated as the study of the ways in which a source text can be transformed to suit the goals of the person reusing the material. The four fundamental operations[edit] The four fundamental operations, or categories of change, governing the formation of all figures of speech are:[1] These four operations were detected by classical rhetoricians, and still serve to encompass the various figures of speech.

Interrobang The interrobang, also known as the interabang[1] (informally known as quexclamation mark), /ɪnˈtɛrəbæŋ/, ‽ (often represented by ?! or !?), is a nonstandard punctuation mark used in various written languages and intended to combine the functions of the question mark (also called the "interrogative point")[2] and the exclamation mark or exclamation point (known in printers' and programmers' jargon as the "bang").[3] The glyph is a superimposition of these two marks. The word itself is an example of a portmanteau which incorporates an onomatopoeia. Application[edit] For example: Say what‽She's pregnant‽ In informal English, the same inflection is usually notated by ending a sentence with first a question mark and then an exclamation mark, or vice versa. In Spanish, the question mark must be paired up with an inverted question mark; likewise, the interrobang must be paired up with an inverted interrobang (⸘, U+2E18). ⸘Es verdad que eres una chica‽ —— Is it true that you're a girl‽ History[edit]

Repetition (rhetorical device) Repetition is the simple repeating of a word, within a sentence or a poetical line, with no particular placement of the words, in order to secure emphasis. This is such a common literary device that it is almost never even noted as a figure of speech. It also has connotations to listing for effect and is used commonly by famous poets such as Philip Larkin. Antanaclasis is the repetition of a word or phrase to effect a different meaning "We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately." Epizeuxis or palilogia is the repetition of a single word, with no other words in between. "Words, words, words." Conduplicatio is the repetition of a word in various places throughout a paragraph. "And the world said, 'Disarm, disclose, or face serious consequences'—and therefore, we worked with the world, we worked to make sure that Saddam Hussein heard the message of the world Anadiplosis is the repetition of the last word of a preceding clause. "The king is dead, long live the king."

18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing It’s a familiar scene: you’re slumped over your keyboard or notebook, obsessing over your character. While we tend to agonize over everything from structure to backstory, it’s important to weigh how you write something too. A perfectly constructed world is flat on the page if you use feeble, common words. When you’re finished constructing your perfectly balanced world, do your writing a favor and take another pass to weed out these 18 haggard words. Good High on any list of most used English words is “good.” New Another of the common words in English is “new.” Long Much like “new,” “long” is spent, yet it doesn’t always register as such while you’re writing. Old “Old” is certainly one of those common words that means more to readers if you’re specific about how old a subject is. Right “Right” is also among the common words that tends to slip through our writer filters. Different Small “Small” is another adjective that is too generic for writing as good as yours. Large Next Young Never Things All

The Hollow Men Poem Text Mistah Kurtz—he dead. A penny for the Old Guy IWe are the hollow menWe are the stuffed menLeaning togetherHeadpiece filled with straw. Shape without form, shade without colour,Paralysed force, gesture without motion; Those who have crossedWith direct eyes, to death's other KingdomRemember us—if at all—not as lostViolent souls, but onlyAs the hollow menThe stuffed men. IIEyes I dare not meet in dreamsIn death's dream kingdomThese do not appear:There, the eyes areSunlight on a broken columnThere, is a tree swingingAnd voices areIn the wind's singingMore distant and more solemnThan a fading star. Let me be no nearerIn death's dream kingdomLet me also wearSuch deliberate disguisesRat's coat, crowskin, crossed stavesIn a fieldBehaving as the wind behavesNo nearer— Not that final meetingIn the twilight kingdom IIIThis is the dead landThis is cactus landHere the stone imagesAre raised, here they receiveThe supplication of a dead man's handUnder the twinkle of a fading star.

Cheerfulness, Gratitude, Thankfulness, Joyfulness: Quotations, Sayings, Wisdom, Poetry, Aphorisms, Virtues Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo The Good Life Website Cloud Hands Blog Spirit of Gardening "Let me arise and open the gate, to breathe the wild warm air of the heath, And to let in Love, and to let out Hate, And anger at living and scorn of Fate, To let in Life, and to let out Death."- Violet Fane "Even if we can't be happy, we must always be cheerful "Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come "Those who bring sunshine to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves "Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom." - Marcel Proust "A man has to live with himself, and he should see to it that he always has good company "He is a wise man who does not grieve for the things which he has not, but rejoices for those which he has "Precisely the least, the softest, lightest, a lizard's rustling, a breath, a flash, a moment - a little makes the way of the best happiness "Exuberance is Beauty "The best is yet to be

Elegant variation It is the second-rate writers, those intent rather on expressing themselves prettily than on conveying their meaning clearly, & still more those whose notions of style are based on a few misleading rules of thumb, that are chiefly open to the allurements of elegant variation.... There are few literary faults so widely prevalent, & this book will not have been written in vain if the present article should heal any sufferer of his infirmity.The fatal influence is the advice given to young writers never to use the same word twice in a sentence — or within 20 lines or other limit. The advice has its uses; it reminds any who may be in danger of forgetting it that there are such things as pronouns, the substitution of which relieves monotony;... It also gives a useful warning that a noticeable word used once should not be used again in the neighbourhood with a different application.[1] "Inelegant variation"[edit] Bryan A. In poetry[edit] In other languages[edit] Examples[edit] See also[edit]

How To Stop Absorbing Other People’s Negative Energy By Jesse Herman and Steven Bancarz| Empathy is the ability to recognize and feel other peoples emotions. Sympathy is feeling compassion for other people. Often times to be an “empath” means that you are absorbing much of the pain and suffering in your environment, which can sacrifice your won ability to function at a high level. If you have every been in a room with a negative person, you know just how toxic their energy can be. 1) Remember, you can’t please everyone If someone is bullying you, complaining about you, or dissing you, do not make it your mission to try to convince that person to like you. Not everyone is going to like you. Also remember, you can’t change everyone. 2) Be careful who you invite into your life Your body, mind and direct environment is your temple. If you give a person a piece of bread one day, they will be asking for the loaf the next. 3) Stop paying attention A parasite needs a host to survive. 4) Breathe in nature Go into nature, meditate, relax and breathe.

Examples of Funny Puns (and Punny Funs) On a good day, if you have the right friends and coworkers, you can expect to hear or read many examples of funny puns. Whether intentional or accidental, a pun is the use of a word or words that either have multiple meanings or sound like other words, the result of which is humorous. There are several different ways to make a pun. One-Word Puns There aren’t really any stand-alone, one-word puns as they all need some kind of context to create the word play. However, in many cases, the pun is formed within the context by one simple word that sounds like a different word or has another meaning. Homophonic Puns Homophonic puns are created by substituting one word for a similar-sounding word. A good pun is its own reword.I bet the butcher the other day that he couldn’t reach the meat that was on the top shelf. Homographic Puns Corduroy pillows are making headlines.Did you hear about the optometrist who fell into a lens grinder and made a spectacle of himself? Compound Puns Funny Animal Puns

Irony - Examples and Definition of Irony Irony Definition Irony is a figure of speech in which words are used in such a way that their intended meaning is different from the actual meaning of the words. It may also be a situation that may end up in quite a different way than what is generally anticipated. In simple words, it is a difference between the appearance and the reality. Types of Irony On the grounds of the above definition, we distinguish two basic kinds of irony i.e. verbal irony and situational irony. Difference between Dramatic Irony and Situational Irony Dramatic irony is a kind of irony in a situation, which the writers frequently employ in their works. Common Examples of Irony Let us analyze some interesting examples of irony from our daily life: I posted a video on YouTube about how boring and useless YouTube is.The name of Britain’s biggest dog was “Tiny”.You laugh at a person who slipped stepping on a banana peel and the next thing you know, you slipped too.The butter is as soft as a marble piece. Example #1

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Ask- question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz Awful- dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant Beautiful - pretty, lovely, handsome, attractive, gorgeous, dazzling, splendid, magnificent, comely, fair, ravishing, graceful, elegant, fine, exquisite, aesthetic, pleasing, shapely, delicate, stunning, glorious, heavenly, resplendent, radiant, glowing, blooming, sparkling Begin - start, open, launch, initiate, commence, inaugurate, originate Brave - courageous, fearless, dauntless, intrepid, plucky, daring, heroic, valorous, audacious, bold, gallant, valiant, doughty, mettlesome

Annie Murphy Paul: What Your Eyes Say About How You Think And Learn As you read these words, try paying attention to something you usually never notice: the movements of your eyes. While you scan these lines of text, or glance at that ad over there or look up from the screen at the room beyond, your eyes are making tiny movements, called saccades, and brief pauses, called fixations. Scientists are discovering that eye movement patterns — where we look, and for how long — reveals important information about how we read, how we learn and even what kind of people we are. (MORE: Paul: How Your Dreams Can Make You Smarter) Researchers are able to identify these patterns thanks to the development of eye-tracking technology: video cameras that record every minuscule movement of the eyes. In a study published last year in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, for example, Finnish researchers examined how the type and placement of advertisements affects online reading. Of course, disrupting our attention is what advertising is all about.

Let's read together! - Billy Elliot - Mia Smith Jag är ingen litteraturmänniska. Jag vet inte hur många gånger jag sagt dessa ord. Under lärarutbildningen valde jag i största möjliga utsträckning de kurser som fokuserade på lingvistik, snarare än litteratur. Inom ramen för läslyftet arbetar jag och mina kollegor just nu med modulen Samtal om text. En kollega upplyste mig om att vi hade en klassuppsättning av en enkel version av Billy Elliot. Boken är en så kallad easy reader på nivå 3. Läsning Eleverna fick, efter att jag läst på ordentligt inom ramen för Läslyftet, skriva läsloggar, där de svarar på frågorna enskilt. I koppling till detta har jag också visat korta snuttar ur filmen och från musikalen som är baserad på filmen. Skrivande Projektet är ännu inte avslutat. Muntlig presentation En ytterligare uppgift eleverna ska få är att skapa ett kort videomeddelande till mig kopplat till filmen. Så, kunde jag gjort annorlunda? Ämnesövergripande tankar kring läsning

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