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Five Keys to Rigorous Project-Based Learning

Five Keys to Rigorous Project-Based Learning
Voiceover: How will today’s children function in a dangerous world? What means will they use to carve the future? Will they be equipped to find the answers to tomorrow’s problems? Teacher: When you think about traditional learning you think of a student sitting in a classroom and being talked at. Teacher: Now I imagine a lot of you are still thinking... Teacher: They are supposed to be a sponge. Peggy Ertmer: So there are a lot of different ways to approach PBL, a lot of different ways to implement it, but really it all boils down to five essential keys: real-world connection, core to learning, structured collaboration, student driven, and multifaceted assessment. Student: One of the problems in the ocean is that with the higher amount of CO2 calcifying organisms are decreasing and we’re testing to see how well life in the ocean lives without calcifying organisms. Student: --four by eight feet. Peggy Ertmer: So the second commonality is the PBL unit provides academic rigor. Student: Yes.

http://www.edutopia.org/video/five-keys-rigorous-project-based-learning

Related:  Edutopia: Five Keys VideosPBL / InquiryProject Based LearningPBL ResourcesProject & Problem based Learning

Establishing Real-World Connections in Projects (Keys to PBL Series Part 1) Peggy: Usually by starting with an authentic problem in the community, or in the neighborhood, you anchor the unit with a driving question. So students are given this question, for example, "What's in our water? And how did it get there?" And then the students choose different paths to explore that question. Sheela: Start to examine what's happening in your local community. Preparing Students for a Project-Based World Authored by Bonnie Lathram, Bob Lenz and Tom Vander Ark Download the PublicationDownload the Student Quick Start Guide In the paper, Preparing Students for a Project-Based World, released jointly by Getting Smart and Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we explore equity, economic realities, student engagement and instructional and school design in the preparation of all students for college, career and citizenship. The new economic realities are illustrated by Robin Chase, founder of Zipcar: “My father had one job in his life.

Home Play - Managing Your Project For this week’s Hangout, we were joined by Matt Baer, Dean of Students at Riley Street Middle School in Hudsonville, Michigan, Alicia Peletz, Instructional Coach at Rochester Career Mentoring Charter School, a high school in New York, and Katrina Martinez, Director of the K-8 Legacy Preparatory Charter Academy in Dallas, Texas. We focused on the following Driving Question: “How can you manage the day-to-day work of students and teams during a project?” Here were some of the highlights: Question 1: How do you prepare students for PBL? PBL Gallery Home | Getting Started | Modules | Resources | About Us View the work of teachers who developed and implemented PBL units/mini-units. Feel free to download and use the PBL as a template for your work with students. We appreciate your feedback.

12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources 12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources by Shannon Dauphin Project-based learning is becoming increasingly popular as teachers look for a way to make lessons stick in the minds of their students. Building Rigorous Projects That Are Core to Learning (Keys to PBL Series Part 2) Steven: A lot of people think that Project Based Learning is fluff. So what we did, instead of having a three-column rubric that has "Unsatisfactory, Proficient and Advanced," we added a fourth column. It is the "Standards," what has to be taught.

Five Ways to Ensure Real Learning Happens in Maker-Enhanced Projects While not new, project-based learning has become a popular method to try and move beyond surface-level learning. Many teachers are trying to figure out the right ingredients for strong projects that interest and engage students, while helping them meet required learning targets. But implementing project-based learning well isn’t easy, especially when many teachers are more accustomed to direct instruction, when they can be sure they’ve at least touched on all the topics in the curriculum. Churchill’s 5 Elements for Persuasive Speaking Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, famed British Prime Minister during World War II, was not only a noted statesman, but also a gifted student of oration and history. Churchill wrote numerous pieces on history, the English language, and how to develop the skills necessary to develop a mastery of rhetoric. So gifted was Churchill that he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953:

The Differentiator Try Respondo! → ← Back to Byrdseed.com The Differentiator 8 Steps To Design Problem-Based Learning In Your Classroom What Is Problem-Based Learning? by TeachThought Staff What is problem-based learning? One definition, if we want to start simple, is learning that is based around a problem. That is, the development, analysis, and thinking towards a problem drives student learning forward. Structuring Collaboration for Student Success (Keys to PBL Series Part 3) Peggy: The teacher doesn’t just throw control to the students and say, "Let me know what you figure out." She really has to plan ahead of time, she has to figure out how to group the students so that they're the most productive. She has to scaffold their work, so she provides hints or clues or templates, worksheets is necessary, to kinda show them what they need to do first, what they might consider doing next.

13 Tips for Students Getting Started with Project-Based Learning On a recent visit to speak to college students at the University of Washington, I asked how many of the students were regularly engaged in project-based learning at the university level. I was surprised that only a few students raised their hands. As we have been exploring in our series about project-based learning, it is a project-based world. Crafting Questions That Drive Projects Which comes first, the driving question or the learning goals? I think it depends. The most successful projects feed off of students’ passions. Don’t be afraid to tap into them. Take what they are interested in and find a way to connect that interest to learning standards.

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