background preloader

Classroom Guide: Top Ten Tips for Assessing Project-Based Learning (now available in Spanish!)

Classroom Guide: Top Ten Tips for Assessing Project-Based Learning (now available in Spanish!)
Facebook Edutopia on Facebook Twitter Edutopia on Twitter Google+ Pinterest Edutopia on Pinterest WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation What's Inside the PDF? Keep It Real with Authentic Products Don’t Overlook Soft Skills Learn from Big Thinkers Use Formative Strategies to Keep Projects on Track Gather Feedback -- Fast Focus on Teamwork Track Progress with Digital Tools Grow Your Audience Do-It-Yourself Professional Development Assess Better Together BONUS TIP: How to Assemble Your PBL Tool Kit

http://www.edutopia.org/10-tips-assessment-project-based-learning-resource-guide

Related:  Project Based LearningProject & Problem based LearningEdutopia PBL GatewayTeachingPBL

PBL Research Review (Edutopia) Editor's Note: This article was originally written by Vanessa Vega, with subsequent updates made by the Edutopia staff. Studies have proven that when implemented well, project-based learning (PBL) can increase retention of content and improve students' attitudes towards learning, among other benefits. Edutopia's PBL research review explores the vast body of research on the topic and helps make sense of the results. In this series of five articles, learn how researchers define project-based learning, review some of the possible learning outcomes, get our recommendations of evidence-based components for successful PBL, learn about best practices across disciplines, find tips for avoiding pitfalls when implementing PBL programs, and dig in to a comprehensive annotated bibliography with links to all the studies and reports cited in these pages.

12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources 12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources by Shannon Dauphin Project-based learning is becoming increasingly popular as teachers look for a way to make lessons stick in the minds of their students. PBL Teachers Need Time to Reflect, Too Student reflection is a key ingredient in project-based learning, and for good reason. As John Dewey reminded us nearly a century ago, "We do not learn from experience . . . we learn from reflecting on experience." Reflection not only makes learning stick at the end of a project but also helps students think about what's working well and what's not during PBL. When students take time to reflect on their progress, they can make revisions or course corrections so that they can achieve better results. (For a look at student reflection strategies, read High Tech Reflection Strategies Make Learning Stick.) The same holds true for teachers.

Confessions of a Teacher Who Doesn't Believe In Education  I was one of those people that always knew what I wanted to be when I "grew up". I wanted to teach. Asking children, and teenagers what they want to be when they grow up , or what they want to major in when they graduate high school, is a pretty common question. Many people never know the answer, those of us that do, and are luckily enough to have a response that falls onto the list of " acceptable, and safe jobs," seem to have it lucky. As a child I played school with my neighbors, I was always the teacher, and if they weren't around, I taught pretend students, and helped my mom, an elementary teacher, grade papers. My bedroom, transformed into a classroom, complete with chalk board, white board, and bulletin board, that had a new theme each month.

Twenty Ideas for Engaging Projects The start of the school year offers an ideal time to introduce students to project-based learning. By starting with engaging projects, you'll grab their interest while establishing a solid foundation of important skills, such as knowing how to conduct research, engage experts, and collaborate with peers. In honor of Edutopia's 20th anniversary, here are 20 project ideas to get learning off to a good start. 1. Flat Stanley Refresh: Flat Stanley literacy projects are perennial favorites for inspiring students to communicate and connect, often across great distances. Now Flat Stanley has his own apps for iPhone and iPad, along with new online resources.

8 Steps To Design Problem-Based Learning In Your Classroom What Is Problem-Based Learning? by TeachThought Staff What is problem-based learning? One definition, if we want to start simple, is learning that is based around a problem. That is, the development, analysis, and thinking towards a problem drives student learning forward. Integrated PBL Projects: A Full-Course Meal! In the project-based learning field, we use the metaphor that projects are the "main course, not the dessert" (as coined in an article from the Buck Institute for Education). Projects are intended to create the need-to-know content and skills, and the opportunity for students to learn them in an authentic context. When teachers first design PBL projects, they are often limited. In fact, I recommend that.

Defining "Best Practice" in Teaching It's often said in the teaching world (as in many professions and trades, I imagine), "Why reinvent the wheel when there are plenty of practices that already work?" In their book, Professional Capital: Transforming Teaching in Every School, Andy Hargreaves and Michael Fullan share their definition for "best practices," which they define as existing practices that already possess a high level of widely-agreed effectiveness. We teachers are standing on the shoulders of giants before us who have developed tried-and-true strategies by testing them out, reflecting on the outcomes, and honing those strategies over decades or longer. And they work; they get results.

STEM MI Champions: Leading Project-Based Learning / PBL Gallery Home | Getting Started | Modules | Resources | About Us View the work of teachers who developed and implemented PBL units/mini-units. Feel free to download and use the PBL as a template for your work with students. We appreciate your feedback. 42 Fill-in-the-Blank Prompts For Students To Design Their Own Projects 42 Fill-in-the-Blank Prompts For Students To Design Their Own Projects by Terry Heick So often, we make learning more complicated than it has to be. Sparking Civic Engagement by Building in Public Spaces Alexa: I’ve always been interested in the idea of making things from nothing. When I was a kid I’d always grab my Lego box and try to make something totally imaginary, like a whole city or something awesome out of it. And so when I found out about this I’m, like, “Wait, I’m actually building a whole park, and not just a park-- a whole mini-world full of beaches and cities and forests. I’m actually getting to do something that I don’t get to do in school.

Related: